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Mcgyver
02-01-2012, 10:45 AM
I have some reno's planned and am thinking of installing a couple of pocket doors in the kitchen - they're almost always open anyway and the pocket door is a real improvement in that it takes up no space

Anyway, I'm wondering if anyone has a quality brand recommendation. I'd like something well built and don't have time to built it myself. Will use the existing doors, just need the hardware kit

thanks

BigMike782
02-01-2012, 11:50 AM
When I worked at the hardware store/lumberyard(93-06) we sold L E Johnson brand and did not have any issues.
http://www.johnsonhardware.com/

One tip I learned was to sheet the walls with plywood as opposed to drywall,makes a stiffer wall and finishes nice.

Stepside
02-01-2012, 11:51 AM
I just built two pocket doors. I would use nothing else besides the metal frame kits and the Johnson brand of track. I have used Stanley track in the past. Stanley is crap at the best.

I can probably get you model and part numbers if you wish.

Pete

Spookydad
02-01-2012, 12:16 PM
Just remember you can't put a light switch on the pocket side of the door.

We once had a master bath with a pocket door. I will never do that again. It was noisy and a PITA in the dark when you got up to pee. You have to close the door to turn on the light, so that meant noise twice in short succession.

In a low usage door like you have, I wouldn't hesitate to use them again.

Neil

Mcgyver
02-01-2012, 12:27 PM
great feedback, thank you guys!

All I knew about them was that i didn't want whatever home depot was selling :D. Sounds like Johnson is the way to go

JMS6449
02-01-2012, 12:45 PM
Use the commercial grade Johnson hardware. Have doors that I installed in 1988 that are trouble free.

flylo
02-01-2012, 02:58 PM
I ran a lumber yard for years & agree use nothing but Johnson. Don't use the pre assebled one.

kendall
02-01-2012, 05:30 PM
Just remember you can't put a light switch on the pocket side of the door.

We once had a master bath with a pocket door. I will never do that again. It was noisy and a PITA in the dark when you got up to pee. You have to close the door to turn on the light, so that meant noise twice in short succession.

In a low usage door like you have, I wouldn't hesitate to use them again.

Neil

What's real fun is when you install a pocket door, then 3 days later get a call about it no longer working. When you go back to repair it, you find coat hooks installed through the pocket.

In some cases I've installed light switches that were spring loaded on them, set up so that when you pulled the door out 1" or so the light would come on. The switches were regular lever action limit switches. If you needed the light on with door open, just pull it out a bit

Bob Fisher
02-01-2012, 05:45 PM
I installed a pocket door from HD a couple years ago. Don't know the brand, but has quality trucks supporting the door. Four ball bearing rollers on each truck, adjustable for height, and quick release to remove the door if necessary. No need yet and works smoothly and quietley. The only complaint is the bottom guides, but no problem for a HSM, made a delrin guide and screwed it in place. Works very well. Bob.

grumpygator
02-01-2012, 06:12 PM
In the last 25 years I have instaled more than I can remeber.
My way as follows:
RO 2x door + 1 1/2 "
Carpet/ tile allowance 3/4"
Add 1x4 under pocket side 1/4" less than pocket.[ PT on cement]
Plumb pocket side stud {no twist or bows]
Instal 1x4 if needed on floor on pocket side.
Place frame on 1x4 and nail butt end of frame to pocket side stud.
Cut two headers [2x4s no twist or bows]
place ONE 2x4 header on top of pocket and nail thru plumb stud into header.
level 2x4 header to door jam side and nail.
At door jam side nail or screw top of pocket door frame to level header up thru bottom.
Measure cut and fit jack on jam side.
add second 2x4 header to top of header with toe nails on out side [Take care not to nail thru track or pocket area ]


After drywall :
Fit door to track and plumb .
Nail closed side jam to pocket door header at top both sides.
With door closed to jam shim jam to door in at least four places if not more.
I shim above and below all locks and three or four other places as well ,stay off floor by at least two inchs.
This took longer to type than I would take to hang the door.
PS WHEN RUNNING BASE DONT REPEAT DONT NAIL THRU BASE ON POCKET SIDE ABOVE 1x4 OR GLUE.
Been there done that aint pretty.
************GG***************
PSS Cant seem to down load spell check to my machine.Good thing Iam a better carpenter/machinist than keyboard comando.:D

Stepside
02-01-2012, 08:08 PM
Because of not wanting any trim, I made the doors smaller than the opening and then added on to the doors once in place. The brass screws holding it together is part of the "look". I also made custom brass door pulls and finished them in "oil rubbed bronze".

For a simple Pine door in an "off size" I was quoted $900.00 not including the glass. Douglas Fir was $750.00. This is for a 36" x 92.5" door. I figured I could screw up at least 3 doors and still be money ahead.

We used the metal frame kit and the Johnson commercial track kit. The custom sandblasted glass for the two doors would have been $400.00 but the glass man needed some machine work on his Aprilia.

When you use the plywood is it MDO or do you drywall over the ply?

firbikrhd1
02-01-2012, 08:34 PM
Coincidentally, I am in the middle of building partitions for a bedroom/bath in my home and just installed a pocket door. The one I used came from Home Depot and is made by Jeld Wen. It uses Johnson hardware which seems to be of good quality. The Jeld Wen frame is OK but has a couple of things that could be improved upon. First, this was my first pocket door installation, however, I am skilled in construction. The instructions included with the door are poor, at best, and the on line instructions aren't much better. The biggest issue is trying to figure what size rough opening is needed. I suggest lying the frame and face jamb on the floor with the frame header attached and measuring to be certain you have the size. Be sure to leave ample space for shimming as the door frame isn't perfectly square (hopefully your rough opening will be if you built it using straight 2X4s). The other thing I didn't like was that the frame is put together with staples. I used my finish air nailer to add some additional fasteners while I held the frame more squarely than it was manufactured. That stiffened the frame up considerably and held it square.

I suggest a stout header for the rough opening since that is what supports the weight of the door & frame and span of the header for a pocket door is quite long in comparison to a swinging door. Further, the Jeld Wen frame is lightly made and provided little more than form for the pocket and something to attach the drywall. Over time a weak header may allow the top of the frame to sag causing dragging and misalignment. It is probably overkill but I used 2X8s on edge with 1/2" plywood filler between them on top of a flat 2X4 for a header. The span for my 30" door is about 62 inches or so.

I hope this helps with your project!

wtrueman
02-02-2012, 12:16 AM
The only thing I can add is our one pocket door has rubbed the paint off in one area after 25+ years as it sways from side to side as it opens or closes. my .$.25, wayne.