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davidh
02-06-2012, 04:28 PM
i just got a carbide tip 10" steel cutting circle saw blade that is missing a few teeth. anyone here tried to make their own parting blade with one of these ?

i made a couple using a carbide tooth wood cutting blade sections as was discussed in an earlier post. cut the shape with a good cutoff wheel but the body of the blade i used was pretty thin and i didn't have much luck with it.

no sense re-inventing the wheel. . . . . its already not worth repairing imho

Peter.
02-06-2012, 04:56 PM
I found the same to be true with the wood cutting blades. It does work, but there's a lot of flex. I have a used blade like yours but haven't got around to trying it yet with that.

Harvey Melvin Richards
02-06-2012, 05:09 PM
I cut up a 6.5" carbide saw blade that came out of an obsolete Milwaukee cordless circular saw. The main problem with the blades is their very thin body, and the extreme rake on the carbide. With a 10" blade both of those problems would be lessened.

PixMan
02-06-2012, 06:27 PM
I hope I never get so full of time and short on money that I'd have to resort to that instead of just buying actual quality tools. Plenty of great bargains out there to be had.

panchula
02-06-2012, 08:54 PM
I've cut up an old Pirhana circular saw and tried to part off with it. The first could of curls that came off were encouraging. Then the braze failed and the carbide tooth came off. Made another one, and it failed too. Next, I cut another one at a different, shallower angle to make the cut less agressive. It failed too. So from a statistical sample of 1 circular saw blade, I had no successes and three failures. I haven't given up on the idea, I need to find another sacrificial blade from a different manufacturer.

-Mike

Paul Alciatore
02-06-2012, 11:21 PM
HHS cutoff blades start at about $5.00 and are much better than chopping up a wood saw blade. You can buy or make a holder to suit your lathe.

http://www.wttool.com/index/page/category/category_id/15869/

If you want a cheaper alternative, I have sometimes used a hand held hack saw to cutoff parts. With the lathe under power it goes fairly quickly. But you will have to turn it around and finish machine the saw cut surface.

Black Forest
02-07-2012, 01:14 AM
I cut out a few from a 14inch carbide tipped metal cutting chop saw blade. It worked but the brazed carbide came off in a deep parting operation.

In my short experience parting is one of the hardest and easiest things to do on a lathe.

Hardest is to accept that you need good quality tool designed for the purpose at hand. Easiest is to part when you have the right tool. I bought a Walter parting tool and it is great. It makes me look forward to parting and it is fast.

darryl
02-07-2012, 01:16 AM
A project I had in mind at one time was a sort of power hacksaw that would mount behind the bed and be easily deployable. At least you'd have the advantage of it coming down squarely to the workpiece- if you set it up right, that is- plus it would come down where you want it to and not jump to one side or the other as a hand held can. Then there's the safety aspect of not risking getting your knuckles bashed on the rotating chuck.

Another advantage is that it can remain attached to the lathe so it's always ready for use. You don't have to muck with the toolpost.

Just one of a thousand possible projects though.

Black Forest
02-07-2012, 01:31 AM
I used a reciprocationg saw with a metal cutting blade to part. Just to try it actually. It worked but was slow compared to my Walter parting blade.

Why would you want to go to the trouble of mounting a powered hacksaw instead of using a good parting tool? The hacksaw is so slow even if powered.

This is a question not a challenge!!!!!

Mayhem
02-07-2012, 07:15 AM
Did it when I was without a parting blade and found the same problem with the tip coming off in steel. However, it works fine in aluminium and my No 7 tool holder that came with my QCTP now does more than collect dust.

Would I buy a blade just to do this? NO. However, I had one that was scrap anyway and thought why not.

Since then I have purchased an insert parting/grooving blade and the appropriate holder.

ahidley
02-07-2012, 07:49 AM
http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/showthread.php?t=24821&page=2&highlight=parting

Duffy
02-07-2012, 11:40 AM
I have Armstrong parting blades and some no-name Chinese blades, as well as some 0.040 HSS blades that began life as perforating blades on a toilet paper rewinder.
They work fine, and if I got the urge, I COULD run down town and buy an insert-type carbide tool.
That said, this is my HOBBY, and I cut out some circular saw blades to try them. They work a treat, are almost as cheap as borsht so they are truly throw away.
I parted a piece of 8" Sch 80 black iron pipe-Twice! It was a struggle, but it worked VERY well.
Feel free to "waste" your time, or your money, or both, however you like,:D but these are definitely not the worst idea that was ever posted.

dian
02-07-2012, 12:31 PM
peux tu expliquer "borsht"?

bob_s
02-07-2012, 12:35 PM
peux tu expliquer "borsht"?

Borsht = beet based vegetable soup, Ukrainian, or cabbage based vegetable soup, Russian.

dian
02-07-2012, 12:41 PM
no meat? you sure? never occured to me it was cheap.

Rustybolt
02-07-2012, 01:03 PM
I used a reciprocationg saw with a metal cutting blade to part. Just to try it actually. It worked but was slow compared to my Walter parting blade.

Why would you want to go to the trouble of mounting a powered hacksaw instead of using a good parting tool? The hacksaw is so slow even if powered.

This is a question not a challenge!!!!!




About 20 years ago a company made a cut off machine to fit the slide of a screw machine or turret lathe. It was a motor driven saw that used 3 or 3-1/2 inch slitting saw blades. A brilliant ides if flood coolant is available.
Might be worth looking into.