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Tony_Filipiak
02-08-2012, 04:16 AM
So a few weeks ago I decided to get myself a birthday gift. Picked up a HF mill/lathe. (yes I can hear many of you hollar'n that I wasted my money and should have gotten something larger or older or American, but for the size shop I have and the work I do, I really couldn't beat this $300 investment.)

https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-XMwfdPM4-Eo/TzI61MAUAEI/AAAAAAAAAA0/gGsMy2Yep98/s512/SAM_0626.JPG

It came with some lathe tooling, a drill chuck, tilting vise and other random bits and pieces (no collets or lathe chuck, 1 used end mill). I wanted to know from you what other tooling or accessories would allow me to start making decent parts with it? If anyone has any good modifications to make it more capable I'm all ears.

Thanks for the help

-Tony

herbet999
02-08-2012, 04:39 AM
Happy Birthday!

aboard_epsilon
02-08-2012, 05:57 AM
Wheres the slides?

for that money ..i think you got yourself a reasonable starter lathe

learne your things on it in the next 18 months ..

then when you've outgrown it...and learnt about its shortcomings ..you will definitely get your money back on it when you sell it on ebay

and by then, you will be fully clued up on what to buy next

so you cant loose really

btw that lathe in the uk is $1450...youve got the extra height version .

http://www.machinemart.co.uk/shop/product/details/cl500m-metal-lathemill-drill?da=1&TC=SRC-lathe

all the best.markj

Your Old Dog
02-08-2012, 07:30 AM
Happy Bday! A guy can have a lot of fun with something like that.

philbur
02-08-2012, 09:12 AM
Not knocking it (it's already been done a million times) but I have often wondered how you mount an end-mill in the spindle, clamp a work-piece on the table and then get the two to actually make contact.

Phil:)

MichaelP
02-08-2012, 10:32 AM
If this were a gift from your mother-in-law, I would understand it. :eek:

bborr01
02-08-2012, 10:39 AM
This past weekend someone posted one of those on craigslist for free. First one to come to such and such address gets it. I saw the ad when it was about an hour old and it was 60 miles from me so I didn't bother. Not like I need one but I do like FREE.

Brian

REED2
02-08-2012, 12:11 PM
There are lots of people making some fine pieces on equip just like that, no it isnt a bridgeport or atlas or clausing but none of them ever put together a piece that was that capeable withy that small a footprint. mco0ngrats a great buy. tom

mars-red
02-08-2012, 01:03 PM
This is very much like my chinese 3-in-1 and the more familiar you become with its quirks and limitations, the easier you will be able to do fine work with it... it will simply be at the expense of setup time, and lots of measuring interrupting the work.

Assuming you have the compound cross slide with vise that probably came with this thing from the factory, my first two recommendations would be a a good quick change toolpost holder (the Phase II brand AXA knockoff is probably the best balance of price versus quality for this type of machine), and a small milling table (I bought a 5"x7" tilting table that is about 4" high). The latter will help you get your work up to a height where the mill/drill will reach it. I have not decided on a good solution for holding end mills in my milling head yet... it's really more of a drilling head on a boom than a milling head. Without collets that securely hold end mills, they will be prone to slip in the chuck and work their way out.

I think you will find, with your 4 way tool holder that came with this, that you will have one hang of a time trying to use a parting tool or boring bar, and that is why I highly recommend getting the better toolpost arrangement.

Also, if you don't have any centers I would get at least a couple of dead centers (one for the headstock one for the tailstock - they are probably both the same taper, mine are both MT3). You didn't mention a drilling arrangement for your tailstock either... you'll need that to center drill your work when you want to use the tailstock center for support, as well as other miscellaneous drilling operations. For mine, I got a MT3 to JT33 adapter along with a 1/2" capacity MT33 jacobs chuck (keyed, not keyless), and a set of center drills.

There are a million other really-nice-to-haves, like a 4 jaw chuck, steady rest, following rest, filing rest, more types of cutting tools than you could shake a stick at... Err, I almost forgot to mention you should probably get a decent dial indicator, with a good articulated mount, too. I got a cheap Chinese one and pretty much immediately regretted it. I'm in the market for one.

I'm sure others will chime in if I overlook anything. Keep us informed on your progress getting this thing tooled up, and on any projects you start making with it!

EDIT: I just noticed you said it came with a tilting table... so nevermind what I said there. :) Also you say it did not come with a lathe chuck? The picture you have there shows what looks like the 3 jaw chuck that would have come with the machine.

Bob Fisher
02-08-2012, 06:17 PM
A good machine does not make a good machinist. A good machinist can produce quality parts on that machine. It just takes longer! Bob

sasquatch
02-08-2012, 07:16 PM
Is this one of the machines i used to see advertised with a 16" swing??

philbur
02-08-2012, 08:20 PM
A good machinist wouldn't get himself in a position where he had to make quality parts on that machine.:D

Phil:)


A good machine does not make a good machinist. A good machinist can produce quality parts on that machine. It just takes longer! Bob

wierdscience
02-08-2012, 08:30 PM
ANY lathe is better than NO lathe period.

Gravy
02-08-2012, 08:43 PM
A good machinist wouldn't get himself in a position where he had to make quality parts on that machine.:D

Phil:)

Phil,

Some of us weren't born with a Starrett mic in one hand, a 10EE in the other, and a silver spoon in our mouths. Everybody has to start somewhere.

People pay more than $300 for a ticket to watch a football game. The OP can learn some machining and still get every penny back. That's a good deal.;)

sasquatch
02-08-2012, 09:06 PM
Agreed , well stated!!

MichaelP
02-08-2012, 11:08 PM
Anyway, enjoy it. Just try not to spend too much money on any machine-specific accessories. Somehow, I feel you're going to buy different machines soon. :)

Tony_Filipiak
02-09-2012, 12:06 AM
The cross slide isn't on the machine, It's in one of the drawers below while I was cleaning everything up. I noticed the mistake, the machine did come with a lathe chuck, it didn't have a chuck key, sorry for the typo.

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-2dVPPD3Zucw/TzNN2Q6MftI/AAAAAAAAABQ/6_V2PvwgNBc/s512/SAM_0636.JPG

The machine came with a small jacobs keyed chuck and adapter, a small set of HF indexable lathe tools with some HSS tool bits, a couple dead centers, one abused live center. Turns out the spindle for this machine has an R8 taper, so I was looking at getting a set of collets, enco has a 6pc set for ~$20, I figure that will be enough to start. Should I get a small set of 2 or 4 flute endmills, or would a few specific sizes work better? The same question applies to center drills, and lathe tooling. I would also like to put on some kind of digital read out, I was looking at some of the small electronic scales that come with a remote read out. Has any one tried this approach before?

Thanks again for all your help
-Tony

philbur
02-09-2012, 06:55 AM
Gravy,

Did I say anything to the contrary. You are not reading what is written you are assuming what was meant.

Phil:)


Phil,

Some of us weren't born with a Starrett mic in one hand, a 10EE in the other, and a silver spoon in our mouths. Everybody has to start somewhere.

People pay more than $300 for a ticket to watch a football game. The OP can learn some machining and still get every penny back. That's a good deal.;)

aboard_epsilon
02-09-2012, 07:08 AM
The cross slide isn't on the machine, It's in one of the drawers below while I was cleaning everything up. I noticed the mistake, the machine did come with a lathe chuck, it didn't have a chuck key, sorry for the typo.

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-2dVPPD3Zucw/TzNN2Q6MftI/AAAAAAAAABQ/6_V2PvwgNBc/s512/SAM_0636.JPG

The machine came with a small jacobs keyed chuck and adapter, a small set of HF indexable lathe tools with some HSS tool bits, a couple dead centers, one abused live center. Turns out the spindle for this machine has an R8 taper, so I was looking at getting a set of collets, enco has a 6pc set for ~$20, I figure that will be enough to start. Should I get a small set of 2 or 4 flute endmills, or would a few specific sizes work better? The same question applies to center drills, and lathe tooling. I would also like to put on some kind of digital read out, I was looking at some of the small electronic scales that come with a remote read out. Has any one tried this approach before?

Thanks again for all your help
-Tony

forget about the digital read out ..cost you more than the machine did ...

i guarantee ...you will enjoy using your machine ..but also guarantee that you will be looking for better in 18 months time or sooner when the bug bites.


so save your digital read out thoughts for a future machine

like i said you've had a bargain ...and you will not loose ..

learn on this machine ..it will give you a lot of insite for the future


don't get carbide endmills..get hss ones for now whilst you are learning.

don't get carried away on the tooling ..because you'll need a new set in 18 months

all the best.markj

herbet999
02-09-2012, 09:46 AM
Gravy,

Did I say anything to the contrary. You are not reading what is written you are assuming what was meant.

Phil:)


Now I'm curious... what DID you mean?

I'm a beginner myself. Seems like I am better off just buying tooling as the need for such arises. Although that tends to slow down production, waiting on tools.

philbur
02-09-2012, 10:24 AM
I meant exactly what it says. I don't think a good machinist would buy that $300 3 in 1 for making quality parts. That's not to say it doesn't have its' uses, it's just not the weapon of choice for a good machinist.

Actually if you think about it they are even a worse choice for a novice. He never can tell if each of the many problems is the fault of his technique or of the machines' inadequacies.

Phil:)


Now I'm curious... what DID you mean?

herbet999
02-09-2012, 01:32 PM
He never can tell if each of the many problems is the fault of his technique or of the machines' inadequacies.

good point. I know I've struggled with certain tool related jobs only to find out how easy the job is when using a better tool.

Tony, I'll bet there is a lot of support on the internet from people who have similar machines. Perhaps their experience will help determine what can and cannot be done with yours.. good luck.. and again. Happy Birthday.

Bob Fisher
02-13-2012, 09:07 PM
I am also a big believer in "any lathe is better than no lathe". You can make quality parts within the work envelope with some care and practice. My first lathe was a 6X18 Craftsman(Atlas) 50 yrs ago. Cannot imagine not being able to make a simple bushing or something similar when you need it. Enjoy. Bob.

oldtiffie
02-14-2012, 01:56 AM
Here is my 3-in-1 10 x 30 lathe in its original set-up. While heavy cuts may not be possible and set-ups can be difficult, with a little bit of patience and perseverence it could turn out some quite good work.

I still use it as my shop lathe today - a good accurate machine.

It was basically an extended-bed Busy Bee 10 x 18 lathe:
http://www.busybeetools.com/products/LATHE-METAL-10IN.-X-18IN.-3%7B47%7D4-HP-CRAFTEX.html

I took the milling head off, dismantled it and sent it to scrap when I bought my HF-45 mill:

http://s200.photobucket.com/albums/aa294/oldtiffie/Lathe_misc/?action=view&current=Lathemill1.jpg

http://s200.photobucket.com/albums/aa294/oldtiffie/Lathe_misc/?action=view&current=Sm_Mill-drill_head1.jpg

http://s200.photobucket.com/albums/aa294/oldtiffie/Lathe_misc/?action=view&current=Lathe1.jpg

http://s200.photobucket.com/albums/aa294/oldtiffie/Lathe_misc/?action=view&current=Lathe2.jpg

http://s200.photobucket.com/albums/aa294/oldtiffie/Lathe_misc/?action=view&current=AirSmith11.jpg

http://s200.photobucket.com/albums/aa294/oldtiffie/Lathe_misc/?action=view&current=AirSmith10.jpg

http://s200.photobucket.com/albums/aa294/oldtiffie/Lathe_misc/?action=view&current=AirSmith09.jpg

http://s200.photobucket.com/albums/aa294/oldtiffie/Lathe_misc/?action=view&current=AirSmith08.jpg

http://s200.photobucket.com/albums/aa294/oldtiffie/Lathe_misc/?action=view&current=AirSmith07.jpg

http://s200.photobucket.com/albums/aa294/oldtiffie/Lathe_misc/?action=view&current=AirSmith06.jpg

http://s200.photobucket.com/albums/aa294/oldtiffie/Lathe_misc/?action=view&current=AirSmith04.jpg

http://s200.photobucket.com/albums/aa294/oldtiffie/Lathe_misc/?action=view&current=AirSmith03.jpg

http://s200.photobucket.com/albums/aa294/oldtiffie/Lathe_misc/?action=view&current=AirSmith01-1.jpg