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View Full Version : Why don't you see the old wooden tool chests anymore?



J S Machine
02-08-2012, 08:15 AM
So here recently I have been trying to better my tool storage. I have been in machining for about 10 years now, and never have bought any decent stuff. I have some expensive measuring equipment, and other nice tools, but no real place to put them. I figured it was time I started investing in some quality boxes. I scored a heck of a deal on a big Kennedy roller cabinet. Here is the link to the box:

http://www.alexgs.com/product/kennedy-348xb.html

It is about 34" wide, so it is bigger than most of the other guys boxes around me. I like the extra room though. I got the sucker for $400 off of craigslist!

So I decided to go ahead and finish it out. I bought the intermediate box that goes on top of this one with an extra two drawers. I have a stainless handheld box that would sit nicely on top of that, but I also started looking at wooden boxes.

Why don't you see these anymore? I don't see it as being because of the price, because some of these top chests the guys I work with have on their setups are Kennedy's in the $300-$400 range. It seems you can get a wooden box for around the same. It seems the only ones I remember seeing are owned by really old machinists.

I think they are really nice, although I feel like I might get ridiculed for having the only one of these in the shop. Not that I care what others think though. I ordered a set of plans off the internet, and I am planning on building one. I figured I would have a neat project, and a good conversation piece when I am done. I know it won't be easy, but I am in no hurry.

aboard_epsilon
02-08-2012, 08:24 AM
Shiraz Balolia is listening


http://www.southbendlathe.com/products/accessories/machinists_chest (http://www.southbendlathe.com/products/accessories/machinists_chest)

 




http://www.southbendlathe.com/products/accessories/oak_roller_cabinet (http://www.southbendlathe.com/products/accessories/oak_roller_cabinet)


http://www.southbendlathe.com/products/accessories/collet_chests
all rhe best.markj

Black_Moons
02-08-2012, 08:24 AM
I like my wooden chest, small one I got from princess auto. Very high looking quality for the $100 I think I paid new. Stores angle grinder abrasives, die grinding burrs, air fittings, those 100 odd flat wrenchs you get with cheap tools to change the bit, and other small little thingys that would otherwise float around the shop.

I snicker every time I see the abrasive disks in a felt lined drawer, Like they might get scratched!

Overall id say its very nice, The drawers do seem to take up more 'space' then metal drawers for the volume of storage, but all the small/shallow compartments are just something you don't get on the metal toolboxes.

J S Machine
02-08-2012, 09:32 AM
One thing about those little small drawers is you can't really get much in them lol. I haven't ever really known a good use for them. They just look good I guess. Maybe a few pens, small steel rules..

2ManyHobbies
02-08-2012, 10:21 AM
Grizzly has oak and maple chests and cabinets.
http://www.grizzly.com/search/search.aspx?q=%28chest%7Ccabinet%29%20%28oak%7Cmap le%29&cachebuster=9721896468013292

HF even has an oak chest.
http://www.harborfreight.com/eight-drawer-wood-tool-chest-94538.html
SWMBO saw it as a must have then got it on sale with the 20% coupon.

BTW, I'm now competing for those coupons. :rolleyes:

2ManyHobbies
02-08-2012, 10:27 AM
One thing about those little small drawers is you can't really get much in them lol. I haven't ever really known a good use for them. They just look good I guess. Maybe a few pens, small steel rules..
A shoebox full of lathe form tools wouldn't be as easy to sort and would be on the difficult side of heavy to just move around. Ditto for centers, chuck jaws, endmills, taps, and drills.

JCHannum
02-08-2012, 10:53 AM
Gerstner is the standard of wood machinist's tool chests. They still offer a full line of made in USA chests as well as a more economical line of imported chests.

http://www.gerstnerusa.com/CARTgallery1.htm

mochinist
02-08-2012, 11:01 AM
I have a couple Gerstners that were acquired for prices I couldn't pass up, the drawers are a pain in the a55 to pull out and push back in, also if you're not careful you can pull the drawer right out since there is no stop. Overrated imho, they do look cool though.

lynnl
02-08-2012, 11:10 AM
I have a couple Gerstners that were acquired for prices I couldn't pass up, the drawers are a pain in the a55 to pull out and push back in, also if you're not careful you can pull the drawer right out since there is no stop. Overrated imho, they do look cool though.

Since you're in Arizona, I'm assuming you're NOT having a problem with the wood swelling and binding. :)
In what way are they a pain? ...or is that just referring to the tendency to come too far out?

mochinist
02-08-2012, 11:34 AM
Since you're in Arizona, I'm assuming you're NOT having a problem with the wood swelling and binding. :)
In what way are they a pain? ...or is that just referring to the tendency to come too far out?yeah pretty dry here, no swelling.

The tendecy to come out to far is definitely annoying but something you tend not to do more than once or twice. The drawers just easily bind, you need to be mindful grabbing the drawer by both the knobs and pulling slow and even, same for pushing it back in. I do a quite a bit of rush work and I am in go fast mode a lot of the time, dick1ng around with drawers tends to piss me off:p

Just pulled it out for this picture and the damn thing binded on me when I was pushing it back in, lol. I bought it for $75 and it had a bunch of chinese measuring tools in it
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v471/mochinist/Mobile%20Uploads/th_IMG_2181.jpg (http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v471/mochinist/Mobile%20Uploads/IMG_2181.jpg)

aboard_epsilon
02-08-2012, 11:42 AM
yeah pretty dry here, no swelling.

The tendecy to come out to far is definitely annoying but something you tend not to do more than once or twice. The drawers just easily bind, you need to be mindful grabbing the drawer by both the knobs and pulling slow and even, same for pushing it back in. I do a quite a bit of rush work and I am in go fast mode a lot of the time, dick1ng around with drawers tends to piss me off:p

Just pulled it out for this picture and the damn thing binded on me when I was pushing it back in, lol. I bought it for $75 and it had a bunch of chinese measuring tools in it
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v471/mochinist/Mobile%20Uploads/th_IMG_2181.jpg (http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v471/mochinist/Mobile%20Uploads/IMG_2181.jpg)

candle wax rubbed on the runners may help a bit

all the best.markj

mochinist
02-08-2012, 11:43 AM
candle wax rubbed on the runners may help a bit

all the best.markjI'll give it try, thanks.

lynnl
02-08-2012, 12:09 PM
Does it seem like the side to side tolerance is too loose, permitting the drawers to cock over sideways?

That's always been a concern I'd have. Too close and swelling with high humidity becomes a problem; too loose and sloppy, and they just wouldn't slide smoothly.

In any event, I'd think a good rubbing periodically with bee's wax would be a good idea.

Rich Carlstedt
02-08-2012, 01:10 PM
Yes, too tight and they bind, too loose and they cock and jam.

make your own, and you get custom fits for the tools you want to store

http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj220/StationarySteam/Shop%20Tools/P3280007.jpg
Made from Hard Maple


http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj220/StationarySteam/Shop%20Tools/P3030020.jpg
The Felt (over 20 ga steel ) has a temporary plastic cover so the drawer can be laquered


http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj220/StationarySteam/Shop%20Tools/P3280009.jpg
Custom storage for long instruments...and no cocking !
Wax works !

Rich

lynnl
02-08-2012, 01:59 PM
Rich, those are interesting looking corner joints on the drawers.
Don't recall ever seeing such before.

Is that some form of dovetail? ..er what?

Is that maple? Looks very nice.

J S Machine
02-08-2012, 02:48 PM
Yes, too tight and they bind, too loose and they cock and jam.

make your own, and you get custom fits for the tools you want to store

http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj220/StationarySteam/Shop%20Tools/P3280007.jpg
Made from Hard Maple


http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj220/StationarySteam/Shop%20Tools/P3030020.jpg
The Felt (over 20 ga steel ) has a temporary plastic cover so the drawer can be laquered


http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj220/StationarySteam/Shop%20Tools/P3280009.jpg
Custom storage for long instruments...and no cocking !
Wax works !

Rich

Rich,

Where did you source the maple you used? I think I like the maple better than any other color.

lynnl
02-08-2012, 04:09 PM
J S, I can tell you where you can probably find some pretty close to Wetumpka:
Google "miller lumber selma alabama." They don't really cater to the little guy, but they will deal with you if you show up in person. (Or at least that's the way it used to be ...35 or 40 years ago :D )

Of course the maple here in the south isn't quite the same as northern maple.

You might check out white oak too. That would make a great tool chest. Especially quarter sawn.

Lynn

ckelloug
02-08-2012, 04:34 PM
Hardwood Center out in Scottsboro AL is a good place to get all kinds of hardwood from oak to Zebrawood. See http://hardwoodcenter.com/ Admittedly it is also on the wrong side of alabama for Wetumpka.

Rustybolt
02-08-2012, 05:00 PM
Richard. You do beautiful work.

coalsmok
02-08-2012, 05:03 PM
Rich
All I can say is wow.
(cant find the little bowing down smilies)

sasquatch
02-08-2012, 05:54 PM
Rich, a real nice chest!!

Great work, and those drawer corners-------------?

Seen that before somewere, what is that joint called?

lynnl
02-08-2012, 06:29 PM
Hardwood Center out in Scottsboro AL is a good place to get all kinds of hardwood from oak to Zebrawood. See http://hardwoodcenter.com/ Admittedly it is also on the wrong side of alabama for Wetumpka.

Yeah, I'm aware of that outlet in Scottsboro Cameron, but I've never been there. There used to be an outlet in Madison too, Madison Hardwoods I believe.

I used to live in Selma, long ago ..mid '70s, just a few blocks from Miller Lumber and bought from them several times. Drove right past their sawing shed every day. Big band saw, probably 6" wide, from below ground to 10 or 15 ft above ground level. Their main product was Cahaba brand hardwood flooring.

justanengineer
02-08-2012, 06:49 PM
Ive got a few Kennedy's, been to the factory a few times, and honestly still am not impressed. They work, but are rather cheaply and simply built, and definitely do not hold their value. In my area here they come along regularly for <$300 for a bottom roller with top box in nice condition. I buy the top boxes with measuring tools included, and generally dont pay more than $25 unless something super valuable is included.

I also see "Gerstners" fairly regularly here, but most are crap. Gerstner simply hasnt made a high quality box short of their top of the line models in quite a few years now, at least compared to the jewels that were made 50+ years ago. Something else to be very wary of with Gerstners is the popularity of fakes. Many dont realize, but it is a rather popular practice amongst the "restoration" crowd to buy an old wrecked Gerstner for the hardware/badges, and build their own. If you see one with old hardware, yet perfect wood with the grain going every which way its likely a fake. As others have said, Gerstners are beautiful boxes, but for everyday use I would prefer something with ball bearing slides that is easily cleaned and moved. In the home shop however, needs are different, so to each their own.

To me the ultimate toolbox will always be a Vidmar cabinet.

Mister ED
02-08-2012, 06:51 PM
Rich - Very nice.


Rich,

Where did you source the maple you used? I think I like the maple better than any other color.
JS - You may like birch as well. Fairly similar to hard maple. Take some birch or hard maple ... use some walnut dowels/pegs and some cherry accents. Very nice combination.

huntinguy
02-08-2012, 10:17 PM
Yes, too tight and they bind, too loose and they cock and jam.

make your own, and you get custom fits for the tools you want to store

http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj220/StationarySteam/Shop%20Tools/P3280007.jpg
Made from Hard Maple


http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj220/StationarySteam/Shop%20Tools/P3030020.jpg
The Felt (over 20 ga steel ) has a temporary plastic cover so the drawer can be laquered


http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj220/StationarySteam/Shop%20Tools/P3280009.jpg
Custom storage for long instruments...and no cocking !
Wax works !

Rich

WOW
Jealousy is keeping me from saying how wonderful that looks and being in awe of your skill.... Nice work.

NzOldun
02-08-2012, 10:42 PM
yeah pretty dry here, no swelling.

The tendecy to come out to far is definitely annoying but something you tend not to do more than once or twice. The drawers just easily bind, you need to be mindful grabbing the drawer by both the knobs and pulling slow and even, same for pushing it back in. I do a quite a bit of rush work and I am in go fast mode a lot of the time, dick1ng around with drawers tends to piss me off:p

Just pulled it out for this picture and the damn thing binded on me when I was pushing it back in, lol. I bought it for $75 and it had a bunch of chinese measuring tools in it
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v471/mochinist/Mobile%20Uploads/th_IMG_2181.jpg (http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v471/mochinist/Mobile%20Uploads/IMG_2181.jpg)



Rub the sides (and bottom edges if they contact a runner) with a block of paraffin wax. Makes then much lest likely to bind when pushing back in.

NzOldun

J Tiers
02-09-2012, 12:08 AM
I also hate the old Gerstner tendency to pull right out..... I may "ruin" mine by installing some kind of stop.

I understand NEW ones have a stop............ but I ain't payin for one.

kd4gij
02-09-2012, 01:20 AM
Shiraz Balolia is listening


http://www.southbendlathe.com/products/accessories/machinists_chest (http://www.southbendlathe.com/products/accessories/machinists_chest)

 




http://www.southbendlathe.com/products/accessories/oak_roller_cabinet (http://www.southbendlathe.com/products/accessories/oak_roller_cabinet)


http://www.southbendlathe.com/products/accessories/collet_chests
all rhe best.markj


Those are Grizzly tool chest with high dollar Southbend badges on them.

Frank46
02-09-2012, 02:43 AM
I bought one of the Kennedy tool chests with the 7 drawers. I've had this for over 30 years. It weighs so much right now I cannot even pick it up. Paid $50.00 from Sears. Guess I got my money's worth. Then there are the rolling tool box that was being sent to the dumpster with its keys still in the lock. Had to put new rollers on that one. And last but not least is an 8 drawer tool chest I got at my last job. We had received new ones and could keep the old ones. And they all are about just full. I bought one of the sears crafts roll around centers. stuck a laminated plywood top on it with about ten coats of polyurethane. Did that so I would have some increased surface area for work. Tool boxes, over the years I have amassed a bunch of tool boxes. One or two "Long Island" tool boxes. For those of you who never lived on long Island thats two 5 gallon plastic pails with screw top lids. Tool boxes for metric stuff and one just for my john deere tractor. Suprised my house hasn't taken a list to starboard. Have a good night. Frank

Blackadder
02-09-2012, 04:01 AM
Still for sale in the UK at a price
http://www.chronos.ltd.uk/acatalog/NEW-_TRADITIONAL_TOOLMAKERS_TOOL_CHEST.html

kendall
02-09-2012, 05:56 AM
Rub the sides (and bottom edges if they contact a runner) with a block of paraffin wax. Makes then much lest likely to bind when pushing back in.

NzOldun

Other things that help are thumb tacks, placed either at the inside end on the drawer sides, or in the case opening at the front, will keep drawers from cocking. Can do both but need to go high and low with the tacks, so thin drawers are a pain.

If placed only at front, also break the rear edge of the drawer sides with a file or sand paper so it's less likely to dig. Nice smooth brass type can even look 'original'

Guess you could bore some small holes and turn slick plastic plugs to fine tune the slop out

When I used to build plain drawers, I'd taper the side panels slightly for about 2-3 inches back from the rear so they were more likely to guide themselves in rather than jam if they cocked.

aboard_epsilon
02-09-2012, 07:16 AM
i say stuff the wood and the expense

you cant beet these for storing your stuff ..look out for cheap ones and you're on a winner

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/metal-15-drawer-filing-cabinet-multi-drawer-bisley-/260951851196?pt=UK_BOI_Office_Equipment_Supplies_O ffice_Furniture_ET&hash=item3cc1f140bc

all the best.markj

Spin Doctor
02-09-2012, 09:00 AM
i say stuff the wood and the expense

you cant beet these for storing your stuff ..look out for cheap ones and you're on a winner

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/metal-15-drawer-filing-cabinet-multi-drawer-bisley-/260951851196?pt=UK_BOI_Office_Equipment_Supplies_O ffice_Furniture_ET&hash=item3cc1f140bc

all the best.markj

Agreed as to the cabinet. But although I knew about colour and aluminium I did not the Brits spelled B E A T diffrerent. Maybe its a Welsh thing. :D

Weston Bye
02-09-2012, 09:51 AM
Agreed as to the cabinet. But although I knew about colour and aluminium I did not know the Brits spelled B E A T diffrerent. Maybe its a Welsh thing. :D

There, I fixed your wording so it made more sense. Be careful about correcting others. This is a BBS, not a legal document or a college thesis. Let's cut each other a little slack.

Yes, I have too much time on my hands at the moment.:D

aboard_epsilon
02-09-2012, 01:48 PM
SORRY...I have a job getting IESPELL to work with this windows 7.
Also this forums posting interface isn't quite compatible with windows 7...sometimes i cant see what Ive just typed ..its like scored across and fuzzy...have to post it, then go back and edit it.

so, lots of typos and spelling errors will be in my posts ..until they bring out an updated versions.

it's hardwork. :o

all the best.markj

kendall
02-09-2012, 04:15 PM
SORRY...I have a job getting IESPELL to work with this windows 7.
Also this forums posting interface isn't quite compatible with windows 7...sometimes i cant see what Ive just typed ..its like scored across and fuzzy...have to post it, then go back and edit it.

so, lots of typos and spelling errors will be in my posts ..until they bring out an updated versions.

it's hardwork. :o

all the best.markj

Must be settings or browser related, I've been on W7 since closed beta, and have no issues with this forum at all. (w7 64, and seamonkey for browser)

Rex
02-09-2012, 05:56 PM
A few years ago both Sam's and Costco had very nice, large, wood machinists boxes, bigger than the typical Gerstner. costco had maple, Sam's had Oak. Both seemed of very good quality, though most likely imported. Both were around $100. I'm still kicking myself for not buying several.

Spin Doctor
02-09-2012, 07:17 PM
About typos and spelling. We all do it. Myself perhaps more than others. So Mia Culpa, Mia Culpa, Mia Culpa

mklotz
02-09-2012, 07:29 PM
About typos and spelling. We all do it. Myself perhaps more than others. So Mia Culpa, Mia Culpa, Mia Culpa

Ah, that would be mea culpa. Mia is Italian, not Latin. :D :D

Rich Carlstedt
02-09-2012, 11:39 PM
Some answers on the Maple Cabinet, and thanks for the kind words fellows.

I was tired of having drawers too shallow or too deep for my needs, and while there are several designs available on the net, I sketched out my own.
Enrolled in a Saturday woodshop class for old farts at the local tech college, where they have everything and more in wood tooling.
Bought Northern Hard Maple from a saw mill, which came 15/16 thick and 4 to 8 inches wide. It machines beautiful, and does not split or chip and has a dense surface. One shop guy said " oh, that stuff is hard to cut", to which I said I am a machinist and use to hard cuts. The instructor laughed because he said other machinists had built tool chests in the class and they didn't work, because they made them like a machine tools ( +/-.005 I guess)

I took the wood and slit some of it ( called "resawing") into pieces 9/16 and 4/16 thick (from 15/16) and then planned/power thickness sanded into pieces 1/2 and 3/16 sizes. I had to bring in my 6" angle plates from home and straddle the big bandsaw blade to control thickness (they had never seen this ). The rest was cut equally thick, to make 3/8 inch boards for the drawers.
I was going to make finger joints, but the instructor told me to make drawers with dovetails, and to go get some more wood as the thinest the dovetail router could handle was 5/8.
I looked at the machine and figured out that if i shimmed the board with scrap pieces of OSB (particle board ) I could fool the cutter , and make 1/2 dovetails. A normal dovetail is hidden, but when you do it 1/2, the end gets exposed and looks beautiful, paticularly if you sand with fine sandpaper at high speed, and it burns the cross grain .
The box material is 1/2 thick and the back is 3/16. The boards were glued up into 13" wide pieces before sanding
The drawers are 3/8" and the bottom is steel with felt top, and all exposed wood is laquered. the steel bottom flots in a slot , but is glued with Gorilla glue at the front center , and back center, thus allowing the wood to expand/contract and yet the drawer feels solid.

The neatest tool they have is a powered thickness sander, which will sand boards upto 36" wide. I had fun when the instructor tried to show me the adjustment for thickness, which is all in thousandths. He told me to read the wall chart to figure out how thick I needed the wood. You could take from .01 to .030 off the planks depending on width and hardness.
I told him i only think in thousandths.

My wood bill was around $60 and the class cost about $ 25
The steel and felt were scrap.

Rich

I may have a sample joint and will post a photo if I find it

Davo J
02-10-2012, 01:38 AM
Yes, too tight and they bind, too loose and they cock and jam.

make your own, and you get custom fits for the tools you want to store

http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj220/StationarySteam/Shop%20Tools/P3280007.jpg
Made from Hard Maple

Rich

Really nice chest Rich, you did well.
What did the instructor think of it, since he is into wood work full time?

Dave

Tony Ennis
02-10-2012, 08:19 AM
Rich, those are interesting looking corner joints on the drawers.
Don't recall ever seeing such before.

They are machine-cut dovetails, generally cut using a router and a jig consisting of a fingers. The fingers guide the router to allow the pins and tails to be perfectly spaced so they mate. Normally the jig is set up for cutting half-blind dovetails. This would have left the drawer fronts without the half-moon shape.

Rich Carlstedt
02-10-2012, 09:36 AM
Terrific Description Tony ! Right on....

Dave, the instructor was quite surprised.
He has had the class for 15 years and during that time, a fair share of tool chests had been done. Thought mine was one of the best ones so far.
He was intriqued at the use of thinner wood, as all the others had 5/8" or 3/4" sides and drawers. I saw a few and they were ugly, especially when you compare them to Gerstner type construction. I guess if the chest is for woodworking, it's OK
Said most guys choose Oak , and a few used walnut, but that Maple looked far better. mine was the first Maple chest done in the class

Rich

Dr Stan
02-10-2012, 09:53 AM
Rich,

I too wish to congratulate you on a job well done. Quite impressive work.

Stan

lynnl
02-10-2012, 12:09 PM
They are machine-cut dovetails, generally cut using a router and a jig consisting of a fingers. The fingers guide the router to allow the pins and tails to be perfectly spaced so they mate. Normally the jig is set up for cutting half-blind dovetails. This would have left the drawer fronts without the half-moon shape.

I have an old Sears dovetail jig, with fixed fingers. Haven't used it in years, but I'm having a hard time imagining how it could cut perfect looking half round sides on the tails.

I'm sure a different template could be worked up to do that though, if one were so inclined (and ambitious enough). :)

oldwing
02-10-2012, 01:55 PM
Rich,
you mentioned that you had a detail shot of the drawer joints. Would you mind posting it, please? I've not seen one quite like that, and I've done lots of dovetails, both machine and hand-cut.

thanks.

Bruce

mochinist
02-10-2012, 07:47 PM
Wow Rich, very nice.

Rich Carlstedt
02-11-2012, 12:37 AM
Here you go Bruce

This photo shows the normal 3/4 " thick wood piece that a dovetail cutter sees.
Except that my good 3/8 "Maple piece is on top and the bottom is 3/8 scrap wood .
I used cheap MFD for that and kept cutting off the DT on it so each router pass had full support from the MFD . This is important. The MFD can be any thickness, even 1", as long as it fits in the DT jig and gives back up.
Please note: I tossed the original MFD and substituted some plywood for the photos
If you look on the right side, I put INK where the DT cutter would normally cut. In the second photo, I split the two apart to show what is good and what becomes scrap
http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj220/StationarySteam/Shop%20tales/P2110101.jpg

http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj220/StationarySteam/Shop%20tales/P2110102.jpg


The tongue portion gets the same treatment. It is doubled and then the scrap tossed. Here in black ink is what is normally cut , but that is also scrap
http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj220/StationarySteam/Shop%20tales/P2110103.jpg
http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj220/StationarySteam/Shop%20tales/P2110104.jpg

Now before you say " Just don't go so deep with the DT cutter" , realise that the tongue will not fit the mating part, you need to shim the work to get a balanced spacing. Some of the more experienced woodworkers here may have a valid and better suggestion, but my approach was to shim and keep it simple...for me.

Rich Carlstedt
02-11-2012, 12:44 AM
continuing:

Here are the parts assembled, and a spare drawer side to display the short tongues, the slide groove ( bottom side - not to visable) and the .020" slot for the tin bottom
http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj220/StationarySteam/Shop%20tales/P2110105.jpg


and the finished product

Rich
http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj220/StationarySteam/Shop%20Tools/P3280007.jpg

oldtiffie
02-11-2012, 01:17 AM
I would never have a wooden chest in my shop - period.

They are heavy and cumbersome and compared to a good multi-drawer steel cabinet on good castors are very inefficient storage devices for the same envelope.

I have several good steel chests of drawers on good casters and they are as smooth as I could wish or need.

oldtiffie
02-11-2012, 01:23 AM
SORRY...I have a job getting IESPELL to work with this windows 7.
Also this forums posting interface isn't quite compatible with windows 7...sometimes i cant see what Ive just typed ..its like scored across and fuzzy...have to post it, then go back and edit it.

so, lots of typos and spelling errors will be in my posts ..until they bring out an updated versions.

it's hardwork. :o

all the best.markj

Odd that Mark.

I've used this forum on W2K, XP and W7 with IE's 6>9 and never a real problem although IE9 on W7 sure shows up IE8 on XP. Older IE's on older machines were slower but that's all.

IESpell worked fine on all IE's except that is too fast for me at times on W7.

Black Forest
02-11-2012, 02:28 AM
John I was thinking you should give me all the tools you don't know you have!

You won't miss them because you don't know you have them. I of course would have to come and get them when you are not there because if you sort them out then you would know you have them.

For instance all those drill bits. They would be very useful here on my farm.

oldwing
02-11-2012, 11:45 AM
That's certainly an innovative joint! How is it holding up? Had you considered pinning those half dovetails?

I like the design of the box. I've made a Gerstner-style box before for my BIL for his reloading equipment. It worked for him, but it wouldn't for me. I like your design much better. I have few metal working tools (mostly measuring tools), being almost exclusively a woodworker. Your box is very similar to the tool chest that is the very first required project for the students at the North Bennett Street School of woodworking in Boston, and their work is some of the very finest. The drawers are longer than Gerstner boxes, as are yours, and they accommodate tools being stored front to back, rather than side to side.

Your choice of thickness of the sides and drawers is far preferable to the thicker style. It's much classier and just as functional. After all, you're not storing your pneumatic drivers in there.

I don't think that tool chests like yours, which is very similar to what I have in mind for mine, actually get moved very much, so portability is not a primary concern.

On Woodcentral a couple weeks ago, there was a posting about a product called Kaizen Foam that made it possible to French fit tools to drawers to prevent them from sliding around, yet much easier to fit than would normally be the case. I particularly like that notion, but the problem is that it more or less restricts a guy from adding more tools to his collection, and who wants to do that?

You've done an impressive job. If that's your first effort at woodworking, you need to keep it up.