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View Full Version : I kinda got my a$$ reamed for



dockrat
02-11-2012, 03:24 PM
suggesting in Grind Bastard's thread about a kindle reading lamp that he just buy the 15$ lamp off amazon so I thought I better redeem myself by admitting that I too, am guilty of making all kinds of stuff I could just go out and buy. Tools, parts,etc,etc.


At today's price of brass and whatever your time is worth I think I would be buying one of those 15$ kindle lamps from amazon.


Because we are hobbyists.


So what is the workshop full of tools for? (snip) I use my tools to make things. Things that are useful to me. Because I ENJOY MAKING THINGS.

Just yesterday I made a candle holder for the wife for valentine's day that I could have bought a hell of a lot cheaper in a store although you wont find one like this in a store. Here is a pic of the top section that was turned out of a piece of 1.75 dia brass prop shaft that i scrounged. This was then pressed into the base that I made out of the brass shaft of a 6" gate valve I had stripped.

http://i253.photobucket.com/albums/hh67/Dockrat1/IMGP1612Medium.jpg

And a pic of it all put together:

http://i253.photobucket.com/albums/hh67/Dockrat1/IMGP16102Medium.jpg

So, yes I too am guilty of makin stuff I could have gone out and bought too. :o

(note for DFMiller....yeah, more brass)

dp
02-11-2012, 03:53 PM
My wife recently bought a Nook reader - the small one with no color or backlight, so she also bought one of those clamp-on lights. We went back the next day and bought another one for my shop. It is the handiest thing ever.

J Tiers
02-11-2012, 08:56 PM
I suggest that those who say ONE WORD about the folly of making something you can buy BE TOLD TO GO POUND SAND, and to not let the door hit their a$$.. (mebbe you did that? I didn't read it)

Your shop, your tools, your time, your idea of enjoyment, YOUR CHOICE.

I don't know why making little steam engines is "more worthy" than making parts you can buy, or fixing a machine that "some" other folks would scrap, making a clock, or whatever.

BUT, if someone CAN buy it, and does not KNOW that, it may be worth while to mention it

140mower
02-11-2012, 09:19 PM
Nice looking candle holder. I also like to consume too many hours in the shop to make things I can purchase for a fraction of the price, assuming of course my time is worth at least two bits an hour. :p I recently spent the better part of a day making a carriage lock bolt for my lathe that I could have purchased for a few bucks, mind you, I had to learn how to thread before I could complete it.
Don

mygrizzly1022
02-11-2012, 09:38 PM
Hi All

I know the feeling..

I am engaged in a some what lengthy process of rebuilding a “Pond Schooner” my father built some 70 years ago.
It was a fine sailing model that I pretty much destroyed when I was a kid. I felt is something I needed to do.
One of the many items that required replacing was about 2 dozen small turnbuckles.
With a bid of digging I was able to source a supplier at a price would be considered reasonable.
However……. I always wanted a lathe, and a lathe is pretty lonesome with out a companion, so a complimentary mill was in order.
Oh....and what are machine tools without tooling?….

So now some 4 years down the restoration road I have managed to learn how to run a lathe and a mill well enough to make the turnbuckles.
The boat still has a ways to go but I am sure glad I didn’t waste a hundred bucks buying those turnbuckles!

Regards: Bert

lakeside53
02-11-2012, 09:39 PM
Nice! To hell with the naysayers...

I just welded about 3 feet of cracks on my wood chipper. POS 10hp about 15 years old... maybe 50 large trees through it over the years. Last week the front bearing assembly simply fell out with the center of the case in 5 pieces:D

I put humpy back together again... and it took only 4 hours and a $10.18 bearing. One of my neigbors almost sneared when he asked - "why not just dump it and buy another"? :rolleyes: I replied simply... "because unlike you, I don't have to";) He then had to listen to 8 hours of continous racket from my chipper... More racket tomorrow.

J Tiers
02-11-2012, 10:20 PM
"because unlike you, I don't have to"

And THAT kinda says it ALL.................

Nice "stopper" .

gnm109
02-11-2012, 10:21 PM
I suggest that those who say ONE WORD about the folly of making something you can buy BE TOLD TO GO POUND SAND, and to not let the door hit their a$$.. (mebbe you did that? I didn't read it)

Your shop, your tools, your time, your idea of enjoyment, YOUR CHOICE.

I don't know why making little steam engines is "more worthy" than making parts you can buy, or fixing a machine that "some" other folks would scrap, making a clock, or whatever.

BUT, if someone CAN buy it, and does not KNOW that, it may be worth while to mention it


I certainly agree. They should pound something. That said, I'm always looking for materials from which to make various items. Fortunately, I have a professional machinist friend who gives me his "drops". I'm all stocked up on 2" aluminum angle and just got another load of stainless steel bars for the next idea.

The whole idea of having one's own tools is to make things, isn't it? :confused:

Black_Moons
02-11-2012, 10:24 PM
Very disappointed in you dockrat. Here you make a nice candle holder with an acme threaded shaft, yet I don't see any precision candle height adjustment mechanism there! Total waste of a good acme rod I say! :p

dockrat
02-11-2012, 11:05 PM
Very disappointed in you dockrat. Here you make a nice candle holder with an acme threaded shaft, yet I don't see any precision candle height adjustment mechanism there! Total waste of a good acme rod I say! :p

Well if ya look closely you will notice it is a left hand thread and I dont have a left hand threading tool to make an adjustment mechanism. Guess I will have to make one eh? :D

oldtiffie
02-11-2012, 11:44 PM
I certainly agree. They should pound something. That said, I'm always looking for materials from which to make various items. Fortunately, I have a professional machinist friend who gives me his "drops". I'm all stocked up on 2" aluminum angle and just got another load of stainless steel bars for the next idea.

The whole idea of having one's own tools is to make things, isn't it? :confused:

Not necessarily so.

If I have an idea I want to try, I take it as far as I need to prove or disprove the idea/precess and after that I drop it - to the material or scrap bin.

I use the shop to run processes to "keep my eye in" or to brush up on my skill-set/s - and then I drop that too.

I sometimes have to "make a tool to make a tool" etc. to make someting for the shop but they are few and far between now-a-days.

I fabricate, use and dismantle jigs and fixtures as required - and then they are dropped if there in no likely use for them in the near future.

I don't make "things" or presents for anyone and I have reciprocal agreements where required there too.

I find that I most times I can - and do - "buy" things as being more efficient use of time, money and resources. Some of those "bought" things get modified if needed as well - but rarely.

My wife and I exchange cards for birthdays, wedding anniversary, Christmas and that's about it. We don't send any cards other then Christmas to anyone else. If its a wedding we give the bride and groom money and they can buy what they like for themselves when it suits them.

This is how the shop was getting:
http://s200.photobucket.com/albums/aa294/oldtiffie/Funnies/?action=view&current=Caveupgrade1.jpg

In an ideal world it was like this:
http://s200.photobucket.com/albums/aa294/oldtiffie/Funnies/?action=view&current=Making_sense1.jpg

And here is the wife and I:
http://s200.photobucket.com/albums/aa294/oldtiffie/Funnies/?action=view&current=Super-guys1.jpg

or more likely this:
http://s200.photobucket.com/albums/aa294/oldtiffie/Funnies/?action=view&current=Biker_and_babe1.jpg

But seriously, we are getting older and we look after each other pretty well, share most "house-hold" tasks, and when we feel like it we go for a drive and/or lunch in one of the shopping malls as we go shopping.

So, really, the shop has almost slipped off the radar (and list of priorities) and only gets used if as and when required. Its all ready to go as required.

"Making things for the sake of making things etc." disappeared not all that long a ago when we had a few reality checks and had our horoscopes read out.

But we are comfortable and well provided for - and the shop is there if and as required.

gnm109
02-12-2012, 12:49 AM
Most of my hoby work in the past 40 years has had to do with motorcycle maintenence and repair. Long ago I got tired of asking others to do work for me. Welding started at $20 to even light a torch. $40 to start up a lathe or a mill. No thanks. I learned to do the things myself with my own tools.

The only thing I would send out would be having a cylinder bored and a piston fitted because I've never found a boring bar at a decent price. If I owned one, I'd do it myself. I could do it on a lathe but my lathe isn't good enough for that sort of stuff. I know my limitations.

So when I longer care to do those things, I guess I'll have an auction.

Black_Moons
02-12-2012, 12:51 AM
Well if ya look closely you will notice it is a left hand thread and I dont have a left hand threading tool to make an adjustment mechanism. Guess I will have to make one eh? :D

Definately. I mean come on that tool will come in sooo handy in 5 or 10 years when you have to remake your lathe cross slide nut, assuming its designed for the right TPI....

DFMiller
02-12-2012, 02:02 AM
Ernie,
Now that's a nice use of some of your tons of brass.
Very nice.
Thanks for posting.
Dave

fixerdave
02-12-2012, 05:03 AM
A shop is a very useful thing but I try to not make it too useful. It's just not the point. Yes, it allows me to drive junk vehicles... Yes, I can save $4 by slip-rolling up an old computer case rather than buying a new exhaust tailpipe. But, doing that isn't really to save money; it'd be really bad economics if it were and I 'aint going down that road. No, doing that was to prove a point. I "can" make my own parts if I want to. That's the point.

My shop is a collection. Not a tool collection, but a "capability" collection. I want to be able to do things - make car parts, fix my bike, whatever. But, to be perfectly honest, I don't really "want" to do those things. I do them as needed, but it's not a "want to." So, I have all the tools I need to pull an engine and rebuild it. Only done a few in my life, and I bought most of the tools AFTER the last rebuild. Well, I suspect I'd still need to get the head planed and cylinders bored... little more than I can expect from my mill. Then again, if it came right down to it, I could probably build a machine to do that if I had to, not that I want to, or have the time to, or the skills to, but I can dream :) I have all the tools and some of the skills I need to do a whole lot of things. Not many of them do I actually want to do. It's just a collection. More useful than collecting stamps or StarWars figurines, but a collection.

More often than not, my "fun" shop-time is spent either building tools for my shop or some totally useless project to learn how to use the tools I already have. Ultimately, it's building a totally useless tool to build skills in using other tools that would otherwise be totally useless. There's sort of a Zen about that :) If building a tool doesn't build a skill I'm interested in, I have no problems buying the tool, and the deciding factor on buying is "will it fit" more than "will I use it." Skills are capabilities too... tools and skills run in sets and, like any collector, once I start on a set I want it complete. Can't help myself - beats drinking, or so I tell my wife.

I spent an afternoon bending up a coat rack for my kid. We have a couple of store-bought versions (his and hers) and I figured a little one for the kid would be cool. Her response "You can do THAT?" Bloody easy, just bend some rod and mig-weld it together. Throw some paint on it. But, honestly, I'm working on keeping that surprised response... going to have to be careful or the honey-do list will get a whole lot longer.

https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-fiywIBa3UI4/TzeJsDoWacI/AAAAAAAACnc/tfUd6XVW_hg/s640/DSCF9100.JPG

HSS
02-12-2012, 07:43 AM
I suggest that those who say ONE WORD about the folly of making something you can buy BE TOLD TO GO POUND SAND, and to not let the door hit their a$$.. (mebbe you did that? I didn't read it)

Your shop, your tools, your time, your idea of enjoyment, YOUR CHOICE.

I don't know why making little steam engines is "more worthy" than making parts you can buy, or fixing a machine that "some" other folks would scrap, making a clock, or whatever.

BUT, if someone CAN buy it, and does not KNOW that, it may be worth while to mention it
Exactly my feelings.

Pat

Black Forest
02-12-2012, 07:57 AM
Exactly my feelings.

Pat

I agree! Who needs a model steam engine? No one. They are cool and it is interesting to read the build threads.

So what is the difference if I want to build a part I could buy?

The statement about learning something and adding that knowledge to the "collection" was right on!!!!!

The idea of spending a whole day of my time using who knows how many thousands of dollars of tools to make a 5 dollar part is my steam engine!!!!!

moe1942
02-12-2012, 08:42 AM
Well I always say why buy something for $10 when you can make it for $50...:D

kbertoson
02-12-2012, 11:11 AM
lakeside53. Now if you bought new it would of put somebody to work. Well at least someplace. Kidding aside. That was the best reply to the "just buy new" crowed, I have read in a long time. This is the "Home Shop Machinist" group. Because we can!

Grind Hard
02-13-2012, 08:21 AM
:D I cause trouble don't I? :D

madwilliamflint
02-13-2012, 10:59 AM
Nice! To hell with the naysayers...

I just welded about 3 feet of cracks on my wood chipper. POS 10hp about 15 years old... maybe 50 large trees through it over the years. Last week the front bearing assembly simply fell out with the center of the case in 5 pieces:D

I put humpy back together again... and it took only 4 hours and a $10.18 bearing. One of my neigbors almost sneared when he asked - "why not just dump it and buy another"? :rolleyes: I replied simply... "because unlike you, I don't have to";) He then had to listen to 8 hours of continous racket from my chipper... More racket tomorrow.

WIN :-)

I'm tryin' to change my way of thinking. But my brain is still pretty entrenched in "replace it" thinking. Slowly but surely.

lakeside53
02-13-2012, 01:05 PM
The more skills you get to less likely you'll chuck it (in my case, often to a fault);)

Luckily I learned young that it it was built by man, surely it can be fixed. I grew up in a country where if you didn't fix it you didn't have one. Geographical isolation, import duties of 50% and import restrictions made replacement difficult at best; that spawned county of guys that fixed everything. Even "toasters" and clothes irons went to a tiny corner store to be ecomonically fixed. Sadly, much of this is now lost ...