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70Chrgr
02-12-2012, 12:18 AM
As I assume many people on this board do, I make many things from the discards and scrap pile at work. I'd like to boast about some recent projects, and encourage others to share their stories of breathing new life into something that was doomed to the scrapyard.

Here's a base for a grinder I made from rescued scraps at work, note the stamping die base

http://i1207.photobucket.com/albums/bb464/Chrgr521/2012-02-10_16-40-31_3.jpg

The grinder that I plan to put on the base was a freebie. I was told it had a broken winding and wasn't worth repairing. After some disassembly, it turned out to be a simple broken capacitor wire. 30 seconds with a soldering gun and one man's inaccurate diagnosis became a bench grinder that will last me forever.

http://i1207.photobucket.com/albums/bb464/Chrgr521/2012-02-10_16-40-15_515.jpg

And finally, inside the die set I used to make the grinder base was a cracked die, used to make plates for Kant-twist style clamps. Rather than throw them out, I plan to use this side to make a 3-set of 1-2-3 blocks. I annealed them on thursday and plan to machine them on monday.

http://i1207.photobucket.com/albums/bb464/Chrgr521/2012-02-08_12-50-41_65.jpg

flylo
02-12-2012, 12:32 AM
More iron saved from the scapper. Good Job!

justanengineer
02-12-2012, 12:34 AM
Very nice work. I am rather jealous that you are allowed to take home scrap from work. My employer allows us access to the wood scrap, but unfortunately our metal scrap usually measures out in the hundreds, thousands, or tons per part, so its rather valuable simply as scrap.

Black_Moons
02-12-2012, 12:45 AM
Wow, that bench grinder looks like one I have been looking for for a very long time but could never afford one that well made new. Nice score!

Arthur.Marks
02-12-2012, 12:56 AM
Yeah - the bench grinder :) I always thought that kind of rest design was far superior to the "bolt to the wheel guard" design that is so ubiquitous.

oldtiffie
02-12-2012, 04:36 AM
One of the problems with cheap or free scrap is that I at least was inclined to take a lot of what was on offer - whether I needed it or not - and as I later had to face up to, most of it was not needed in the then foreseeable future.

It was awkward and took up a lot of other-wise useful space. A lot of it was "drops" and I was stuck with whatever had been done to or with it in its "pre-drop" life.

I found that I had to design stuff that I wanted to make around the "free" stuff and all too often it did not work out too well at all.

So "came the day" when I gave myself a reality check and put all that "good stuff" on the trailer and off to scrap it went - loads of it!!.

Material is expensive - no doubt about it - but I know what is in my suppliers racks and he will cut it to size/order for free and I am ready to go. It becomes a pretty efficient way of getting material ready to start. I get "Trade" prices/discounts on all my material and tools and I pay right there and then - no credit - just cash. I have "Trade" accounts etc. at most of my suppliers.

A lot of that material that is "left over" or has not got a use goes out.

I am retired and I point blank refuse to do any work - "paid" or not - as I was using my material which they/others replaced with utter crap (which I had to get rid of) and replace at my cost.

If I did any work for anyone a while ago, the word got around the traps and I very nearly had lots of "new best friends" and those from "worthy causes" - but they were all refused and/shown the door.

The more people I had in the shop, the more of those people and their friends knew what I had and what I could (would??) "do for them" too.

Its nice and quiet here now and the materials that I do keep on hand are being used a lot less of.

So - no "scrap", "drops" or "freebies" here and life is a lot better.

Same - with the exception of only two people who return stuff/tools in the condition they got it - right on time - the rest, "no way".

So all is peace and light in my shop - and its staying that way!!

I have no issue with others shops and what they have and do in it as it is not only none of my business, but I wish them well in their endeavours.

Black_Moons
02-12-2012, 08:22 AM
Yeah - the bench grinder :) I always thought that kind of rest design was far superior to the "bolt to the wheel guard" design that is so ubiquitous.

Look at that thing! even if you DID bolt them to the wheel guards it would be 100x more rigid then the modren crap I see at stores. Whats that, 3/16"? 1/4"? thick castings?? And look at those tool rests!! SOLID HUGE CHUNK OF METAL! compaired to the 20 gauge stamped crap on modren ones.. Oh man. Very lucky score!

DATo
02-12-2012, 08:38 AM
We generally save all our scrap and when we have time we cut it up on the band saw and cut off saws and then use the shaper and mills to gang cut as many pieces as possible which fall close to the same size at the same time (long sides only). Since much of our work requires smaller pieces I'd estimate that in the 36 years I've worked there we've saved a small fortune in material costs while putting our extra time to good use. Our stock room has these pieces stacked by ascending heights on shelves which makes finding material close to the size we want very easy and saves the burden of having to drag a full length of material out of the crib. Of course a certain amount - the remnants after cutting - always finds its way to the scrap yard but if you figure the cost to buy stock relative to what you get for the scrap the restocking is certainly a better option.

sasquatch
02-12-2012, 09:16 AM
Nice job on the grinder stand, enjoy seeing shop built things like this.

And Nice old HD grinder, -wondering,, is that the same grinder that was posted a bit ago on the OMWM site??

DICKEYBIRD
02-12-2012, 09:24 AM
Yeah but what'cha gonna make out of that clapped our lawnmower axle in the last picture? That's more like the stuff I have in my scrap pile.:rolleyes:

Lew Hartswick
02-12-2012, 11:36 AM
Wish I'd of had access to the use of this die set. It sure would have
made it easier to make the parts of this project I am documenting
for the students. :-) I have made about 4 plus bits and pieces to do
the photos showing making all the pieces. If anyone is interested in
making these I'll put together a file for you. It will be difficult to send
though, it'll have a bunch pix. :-)



http://i233.photobucket.com/albums/ee238/LewHartswick/KantTwist-die.jpg


http://i233.photobucket.com/albums/ee238/LewHartswick/2012_0125_111109AA.jpg

http://i233.photobucket.com/albums/ee238/LewHartswick/2012_0126_091854AA.jpg

Don't have any pix of the finished clamps on the computer at the
moment but will post some later if interested.

...Lew...

MichaelP
02-12-2012, 04:00 PM
Kant-Twist clamp?

oldtiffie
02-12-2012, 04:27 PM
Yup.

http://www.clampmfg.com/

http://www.google.com.au/#hl=en&cp=7&gs_id=q&xhr=t&q=kant+twist&pf=p&sclient=psy-ab&rlz=1W1IRFC_enAU360&biw=1280&bih=523&source=hp&pbx=1&oq=kant+tw&aq=0&aqi=g3g-s1&aql=&gs_sm=&gs_upl=&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.,cf.osb&fp=ccb7af23316d74de

CCWKen
02-12-2012, 04:30 PM
Folks that have access to scrap metal are more likely to invent a use for it. :) Nearly all of my die plates, press plates, form dies, jigs and some tooling are all made from "scrap". Heck, even my old Toledo OBI and Whitney-Jensen bench top punch were saved from the scrapper. After a little cleaning and adjusting, they became a productive addition to the shop. I couldn't do without them now any more than I could do without a lathe.

I try to keep up my weekly visit to the scrap yard. You never know what you'll find there but there's always "drops" from good metal that makes it hard for me to call scrap. I sure would hate to pay postage on a 12x12x1.25" piece of A36. I've salvaged numerous pieces of 3/4 and 1" flats as well as 3x4" solid stock. Some pieces weigh in at 100+ pounds. I may never use it all but if an idea comes up, I have the stock. :D

MotorradMike
02-12-2012, 04:36 PM
http://i1207.photobucket.com/albums/bb464/Chrgr521/2012-02-10_16-40-15_515.jpg


NFG!


567890

MichaelP
02-12-2012, 04:44 PM
I sure would hate to pay postage on a 12x12x1.25" piece of A36. I've salvaged numerous pieces of 3/4 and 1" flats as well as 3x4" solid stock. Some pieces weigh in at 100+ pounds. I may never use it all but if an idea comes up, I have the stock.:D
There is one very annoying problem with scrap yards: you never know what alloy you get. Unless, of course, you can convince them to use their x-ray gun.

CCWKen
02-12-2012, 05:24 PM
It's really quite simple to tell what the alloy is if you're buying structural shapes/pieces. 99.9% of the time around here, it will be A36. A simple grind test can also be used. If the exact alloy is a concern for a project, it's even easier yet--Don't use it. ;) The premise of this thread is making use of scrap. If you can't use it, don't.

Turn the channel. :p

toolmaker76
02-12-2012, 05:46 PM
While still working at "the factory," we were always needed something done on the quick and cheap;most of the time this would be some kind of fixture.

I would do what I called "junkyard engineering." While still in the design phase of stuff, I would see what had been left in the dumpster they used for scrap steel. Very often I would find something that was very near the dimensions that I needed, saving time in machining.

One time when needing to make a "tube holding nest," I found some round pieces with ID's bored that were very near what I needed. There were some tapped holes in the face of the parts, and as they were not in my way, they were of no consequence to me. I did some touching up on the ID to get the size I wanted, sawed/ milled the slot to accept the tube, did some mounting to a base, and very quickly my project was complete.

As it happened, another shift was asked to make more of them based on the design I used. I got amused when I saw the copies- complete with the "of no consequence" tapped holes!:D

Now that I have retired from the "factory" and have my own home shop, I am guilty of being a pack rat when it comes to steel and other materials. I find myself constantly needing stops or fixtures or gages, and a visit to the scrap box will usually produce something very near what I need.

oldtiffie
02-12-2012, 11:21 PM
Originally Posted by CCWKen

I sure would hate to pay postage on a 12x12x1.25" piece of A36. I've salvaged numerous pieces of 3/4 and 1" flats as well as 3x4" solid stock. Some pieces weigh in at 100+ pounds. I may never use it all but if an idea comes up, I have the stock.


There is one very unnoying problem with scrap yards: you never know what alloy you get. Unless, of course, you can convince them to use their x-ray gun.

Quite so Michael.

I make a point of having no "mystery metal" here - at all. I am sick of nasty surprises and buggered up tools - especially end-milling cutters, band-saw blades etc.

My supplier is only 5Km (~3 miles) from here and I pass him every second day. If I need someting he doesn't have (I try not to) he will order it in and have it delivered on his normal delivery truck/courier twice a week. The additional cost (if any) to me is negligible.

A lot of the stuff I buy from him (not a lot now) is from his off-cuts bins so I get it a bit cheaper than if it were from off the racks. Either way, and no matter how big or small it is, I get it cut to size at no or very little additional cost.

The nearest scrap yards are 30 - 60 Km (20 - 40 miles) from here and they charge like a wounded bull.

darryl
02-13-2012, 01:23 AM
I was a good boy today. Sitting on a road waiting for a train, I happened to look out the side window. Farm house, barn- and scrap metal of all kinds laying around almost on the edge of the road.

It was tempting to walk over and check it all out, but I stayed in the van.

I guess maybe I should call a therapist tomorrow-

Seriously, I haven't had a good scrap find in awhile. I'm about due.

Boucher
02-13-2012, 11:13 AM
This 2 1/2" piece of steel came from a machine that I saved from the scrap man.

http://i109.photobucket.com/albums/n50/boucherbyron/IMG_0031.jpg

This is how it wound up.

http://i109.photobucket.com/albums/n50/boucherbyron/IMG_0270Small.jpg

CCWKen
02-13-2012, 02:33 PM
Better test the alloy Boucher. Wouldn't want the forum police to get on ya for using scrap. :D :rolleyes:

mike4
02-14-2012, 03:16 AM
Quite so Michael.

I make a point of having no "mystery metal" here - at all. I am sick of nasty surprises and buggered up tools - especially end-milling cutters, band-saw blades etc.

My supplier is only 5Km (~3 miles) from here and I pass him every second day. If I need someting he doesn't have (I try not to) he will order it in and have it delivered on his normal delivery truck/courier twice a week. The additional cost (if any) to me is negligible.

A lot of the stuff I buy from him (not a lot now) is from his off-cuts bins so I get it a bit cheaper than if it were from off the racks. Either way, and no matter how big or small it is, I get it cut to size at no or very little additional cost.

The nearest scrap yards are 30 - 60 Km (20 - 40 miles) from here and they charge like a wounded bull.
1000kg of tool steel cost $1000.00 to purchase , it cost $1315.00 for freight to me .
I bought the left over stock of a tool and die maker ,most of it is tool steel with some mild steel blocks , easy to tell which is which by spark test or a bump test with two blocks the one which dents easily is mild steel and the other is tool steel .
I now have enough for a couple of years and it didnt go to china for turning into cars or other recycled items.
Michael

MichaelP
02-14-2012, 11:12 AM
Unknown scrap metal is perfectly OK for many purposes, but not when you need to know machinability, hardenability, mechanical properties, weldability, etc. Some of it you can figure out by trial and error, of course, but it may cost you. Some you'll never know till you have a problem later on.

In this respect, it's, usually, better to buy scrap from machine shops. Many of them have a limited assortment of alloys and can tell you what is what. When you need large pieces and/or are OK with a mystery metal for a particular purpose, scrap yard is a perfectly valid source.

So it has nothing to do with "forum police". It's all about common sense.

Black Forest
02-14-2012, 12:39 PM
When I sold my big bandsaw to a local machine shop/frabrication business I made sure I got lifetime dumpster priviledges. This is a pretty big shop with several big buildings. When I need a particular small bit of material I will look in the dumpsters. If it is not there I will go inside and tell the owner that I need this or that. Normally if I can carry it out by myself I don't get charged. I told her that I would prefer to pay so as not to wear out my welcome. She told me if she thought it was too much she would let me know.

My other great source is my hydraulic guy. He gives me all the round stock I want. It all comes from hydraulic cylinders he has rebuilt. Anything from 20mm up to 100mm diameter solid round from 500mm to 2000mm in length. It is a good thing I have a relatively heavy lathe. When I need a 20mm diameter rod and all I have is 50mm rod it doesn't take too long to turn it down!