PDA

View Full Version : I went back to work this week



Weston Bye
02-17-2012, 07:10 PM
After a radical prostaectomy, I am doing well except that I am still 100% incontinent. I went back to work Monday and they saved up a lot of jobs that apparently only I am capable of doing, so I am able to keep busy. Nothing is particularly physical, but I do get a goodly amount of walking in from my office to the plant floor.

The incontinence has amounted to only a minor inconvenience as long as I stop whatever I'm doing and go change my pad hourly.

All that being said, I am nearly exhausted by the end of the day. I have spent most of the evenings sitting on the couch dozing or watching mindless TV - not my preferred activity.

When asked if I was happy to be back to work, I replied "The novelty wore off after 3 days."

In my absence, there were some changes in staffing and my office, better than my position deserved, was needed for a new manager. Today was moving day and instead of a carpeted office, I was moved to an area with a tile floor. That in itself was no big deal, but more on the floor later. The room is more of a technical area and has the x-ray machine, a shielded box that we use for examinating and analyzing the parts we manufacture. I am one of the x-ray technicians for the company and I suggested to my boss that if my PSA next month came back unsatisfactory, that I could disable the safety door and perform my own radiation therapy. :eek:

Also, I sat down at my new desk(cubicle) and looked down at my feet. There was a floor drain! Accident or design? My engineering mind began considering incontinence and the floor drain....:D

Lew Hartswick
02-17-2012, 07:19 PM
Sail plane pilots use an external catheter to a hole in the bottom of the plane, So why not? use a pinch clamp when not sitting over the
floor drain. :-)
...lew...

John Stevenson
02-17-2012, 07:19 PM
Also, I sat down at my new desk(cubicle) and looked down at my feet. There was a floor drain! Accident or design? My engineering mind began considering incontinence and the floor drain....:D

Think of the increase in productivity :D

sasquatch
02-17-2012, 07:34 PM
Wes, good to hear your'e back at work,,had to be so frustrating not being able to do your'e usual things.

flylo
02-17-2012, 07:47 PM
Every hanger I've had has a funnel in the corner & a tube thru the wall into the ground. Dollar General sells urinal cakes 2/$1 just take off the wire before use so when it's gone nothing to touch. Glad you're back to work & doing so well!:D

becksmachine
02-17-2012, 09:08 PM
Glad to hear that you were not only willing but also able to go back. Good for you. ;)

Dave

hardtail
02-17-2012, 09:23 PM
Glad to hear your back at it.........the stamina will improve with time as will control over your bladder.........your sense of humor is a good sign........

Arcane
02-17-2012, 09:28 PM
Weston's new future office? :D

http://lifeinbitesize.files.wordpress.com/2010/03/toilet_desk.jpg

Maybe you could upgrade the throne to the deluxe cushy model.

http://www.trade2win.com/boards/attachments/t2w-announcements/100422d1295373533-trade2wins-10-year-anniversary-day-2-trading-desk-contest-computer-toilet.jpg

hardtail
02-17-2012, 09:39 PM
Arcane thats rough........I guess he can find sympathy in the dictionary between sh!t and syphillus..........

justanengineer
02-17-2012, 09:41 PM
Think of the increase in productivity :D

The funny/sad part is that I have often considered similar measures to keep the flow of work going at my office. Nothing worse than taking a piss only to find your train of thought gone.

Congrats on getting back to the grind Mr Weston. I am sure whatever discomforts and inconveniences you are experiencing now will only get better as your mind finds a few interesting projects to take it away.

RancherBill
02-18-2012, 12:02 AM
Glad to hear the news.

When life gives you lemons you seem to be making lemonade (or whatever).:eek: :) :) :)

Git-R-Done

dp
02-18-2012, 01:33 AM
Congratulations on your continuing recovery and that you have retained your sense of humor along the way. It's nice to be back at work, isn't it? When I think of retirement I immediately wonder what I'll do after the first coffee is done. I really like my job. I think I'd miss it badly once the novelty of retirement wore off.

Steve Seebold
02-18-2012, 04:09 AM
use a pinch clamp when not sitting over the
floor drain. :-)
...lew...

OUCH. That would hurt.

Evan
02-18-2012, 05:05 AM
Astronauts also wear diapers...

Arcane
02-18-2012, 06:30 AM
Astronauts also wear diapers...


In a few years I'm gonna be an astronaut! Who knew? :D

DATo
02-18-2012, 10:19 AM
Best wishes Weston !!!

Lew Hartswick
02-18-2012, 10:24 AM
OUCH. That would hurt.
Steve, Really. :-) The clamp goes on the tubing . :-)
...lew...

Weston Bye
02-20-2012, 03:54 PM
Posted without comment...
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0803/Weston/MVC-011F-1.jpg

topct
02-20-2012, 07:32 PM
A stillsuit is a full body suit worn in the open desert of the planet Arrakis that was designed to preserve the body's moisture. It consisted of various layers that would firstly absorb the body's moisture through sweating and urination, and then filter the impurities so that drinkable water would be circulated to catchpockets. The individual could then drink the reclaimed water from a tube attached to the neck.

I wonder if the invention came about because of another need. It works that way sometimes.

hojpoj
02-20-2012, 09:11 PM
A stillsuit is a full body suit worn in the open desert of the planet Arrakis that was designed to preserve the body's moisture. It consisted of various layers that would firstly absorb the body's moisture through sweating and urination, and then filter the impurities so that drinkable water would be circulated to catchpockets. The individual could then drink the reclaimed water from a tube attached to the neck.

I wonder if the invention came about because of another need. It works that way sometimes.

I never thought I'd ever see a Dune reference on this board. Well done, sir.

sasquatch
02-20-2012, 09:19 PM
Wes,, that funnel seems awfully LOW for standing.

(And the diameter should be increased to at least 12"-- not easy to hit that little thing!!):D

huntinguy
02-20-2012, 10:18 PM
external catheter and a bag for it. Check out some of the medical supply places or specialty pharmacies. Both parts come in different sizes and attachments.

Good luck to you. I understand it takes some time to recover....

Lew Hartswick
02-20-2012, 10:57 PM
I never thought I'd ever see a Dune reference on this board. Well done, sir.
So there are a few Sci-Fi readers around.
But wrt Dune, the first one was great and from there on went down hill.
Same with "Mission of Gravity" and the Pern series. Too bad the
followons never come up to the original. :-(
...lew...

oldtiffie
02-21-2012, 01:02 AM
external catheter and a bag for it. Check out some of the medical supply places or specialty pharmacies. Both parts come in different sizes and attachments.

Good luck to you. I understand it takes some time to recover....

I'd choose the personal catheter which can be strapped to your leg for mobility or alternatively the one used in the bed-room at night.

That set-up in your office is quite unhygenic and unless scoured out regularly would create quite a smell hazard at least.

I thought the micro/"keyhole" prostate removal surgery was going to minimise or eliminate this and a few other problems (ie loss of erection capability etc.) as compared to the radical prostate removal operation.

Pelvic Floor excercises - as are often required for some women after child-birth - may well reduce or eliminate or minimise the incontinence problem.

Ask your Urologist or your referring Doctor.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pelvic_floor_muscle_exercise

http://www.google.com.au/#hl=en&rlz=1W1IRFC_enAU360&sclient=psy-ab&q=pelvic+floor+exercises+for+men&pbx=1&oq=pelvic+floor+&aq=1&aqi=g4&aql=&gs_sm=1&gs_upl=0l0l1l3596l0l0l0l0l0l0l0l0ll0l0&rlz=1W1IRFC_enAU360&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.r_qf.,cf.osb&fp=321c5e1c2d9c0cf7&biw=1920&bih=785

I've done a bit of reading on this occassionally after discussions with friends and others who have or have had prostate cancer and some others.

darryl
02-21-2012, 01:46 AM
A co-worker was talking about a fishing trip he went on with a couple of buddies. Apparently one of them had a tube that went overboard and a part of a turkey baster attached to it. The object of course was that you didn't have to step to the side of the boat to take a leak. Sounds like a good idea- then he tells us that the two buddies were sharing it- He went on to say that the two of them were REALLY good buddies-

I'll use my own tube, thank you.

rock_breaker
02-21-2012, 02:18 AM
Congratulations on returning to work. Hope you continue to improve.

Ray

Weston Bye
02-21-2012, 06:51 PM
I'd choose the personal catheter which can be strapped to your leg for mobility or alternatively the one used in the bed-room at night.

That set-up in your office is quite unhygenic and unless scoured out regularly would create quite a smell hazard at least.

I thought the micro/"keyhole" prostate removal surgery was going to minimise or eliminate this and a few other problems (ie loss of erection capability etc.) as compared to the radical prostate removal operation.

Pelvic Floor excercises - as are often required for some women after child-birth - may well reduce or eliminate or minimise the incontinence problem.

Ask your Urologist or your referring Doctor.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pelvic_floor_muscle_exercise

http://www.google.com.au/#hl=en&rlz=1W1IRFC_enAU360&sclient=psy-ab&q=pelvic+floor+exercises+for+men&pbx=1&oq=pelvic+floor+&aq=1&aqi=g4&aql=&gs_sm=1&gs_upl=0l0l1l3596l0l0l0l0l0l0l0l0ll0l0&rlz=1W1IRFC_enAU360&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.r_qf.,cf.osb&fp=321c5e1c2d9c0cf7&biw=1920&bih=785

I've done a bit of reading on this occassionally after discussions with friends and others who have or have had prostate cancer and some others.

Tiffie, you are taking this too seriously. The funnel and tube were staged and the photo was posted as a joke.

The robotically assisted laproscopic surgery was indeed supposed to minimize the side effects of incontinence, but there are a small percentage of men who experience internal leaks that require extended healing time with the catheter. I just happened to be in that unfortunate small percentage and had the catheter for 54 days rather than just a week. Consequently, my remaining sphincter was stretched out for a long period of time and probably strained each time I involuntarily clamped down on the catheter.

The robotic surgery is purported to be pretty good for avoiding erectile disfunction but because of the nature of my cancer (Gleason 8, look it up) the doctor was more interested in getting all the cancer (scooped out a little extra surrounding tissue) than saving nerves. Still... Things are progressing better than I expected.

I am well accquainted with the pelvic floor "Kegel" excersizes, but at 4 weeks post catheter removal, have yet to show much progress.

As to the idea of the personal (internal) catheter, after my previous experience I'd rather piss in my boot.

sasquatch
02-21-2012, 06:56 PM
Wes, your'e attitude and humor in this dilema are great!!

AS Red Green stated,, "We're all pulling for ya".

(I think it was Red Green!!):D

Weston Bye
02-21-2012, 07:08 PM
Wes,, that funnel seems awfully LOW for standing.

(And the diameter should be increased to at least 12"-- not easy to hit that little thing!!):D

I think that if I actually had to use it I would bring it right up to the source - the headwaters, so to speak. Sort of like the external catheter huntingguy mentioned. The surgery removed some material, so some compensation occurred and things, well one thing, got reeled in some.

914Wilhelm
02-21-2012, 08:33 PM
The big drawback of road trips with the wife is having to stop all the time for bathroom breaks. (might have something to do with the water bottle clutched in one hand). I thought about drilling a hole in the floor combined with a catheter for her. I'll call it a car-theter.

banjoallen
02-21-2012, 09:06 PM
.......AS Red Green stated,, "We're all pulling for ya".

(I think it was Red Green!!):D


Yes it was!

oldtiffie
02-22-2012, 04:59 AM
Tiffie, you are taking this too seriously. The funnel and tube were staged and the photo was posted as a joke.

The robotically assisted laproscopic surgery was indeed supposed to minimize the side effects of incontinence, but there are a small percentage of men who experience internal leaks that require extended healing time with the catheter. I just happened to be in that unfortunate small percentage and had the catheter for 54 days rather than just a week. Consequently, my remaining sphincter was stretched out for a long period of time and probably strained each time I involuntarily clamped down on the catheter.

The robotic surgery is purported to be pretty good for avoiding erectile disfunction but because of the nature of my cancer (Gleason 8, look it up) the doctor was more interested in getting all the cancer (scooped out a little extra surrounding tissue) than saving nerves. Still... Things are progressing better than I expected.

I am well accquainted with the pelvic floor "Kegel" excersizes, but at 4 weeks post catheter removal, have yet to show much progress.

As to the idea of the personal (internal) catheter, after my previous experience I'd rather piss in my boot.

Weston,

I am quite werll aware of the Gleason Score and what it means. For those that are not see:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gleason_score

http://www.google.com.au/#hl=en&gs_nf=1&cp=5&gs_id=k&xhr=t&q=gleason+score&pf=p&output=search&sclient=psy-ab&pbx=1&oq=gleas&aq=0&aqi=g4&aql=&gs_sm=&gs_upl=&rlz=1W1IRFC_enAU360&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.r_qf.,cf.osb&fp=321c5e1c2d9c0cf7&biw=1920&bih=785

The Partin Tables will help assist in judging if the cancer is wholly contained within the Prostate envelope or whether some cancer has escaped (metasized) and whether the cancer has metasized to the bones/skeleton. It also assists in judging whether the cancer is operable or not.

http://www.google.com.au/#hl=en&gs_nf=1&cp=12&gs_id=3k&xhr=t&q=partin+score&pq=gleason+score&pf=p&rlz=1W1IRFC_enAU360&sclient=psy-ab&pbx=1&oq=partin+score&aq=0&aqi=g1&aql=&gs_sm=&gs_upl=&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.r_qf.,cf.osb&fp=321c5e1c2d9c0cf7&biw=1920&bih=785

Weston, as a layman, I can only assume that the removel of extra tissue is related to the pathology during the operation to catch any cancer that may have escaped the prostate as the pathology in the theatre is the first positive assessment as all others are based on probability from previous pathology on previous patients.

The final post-operative grading will be done later in better testing machines in the Pathology laboratory.

It should be said that Pathology is not 100% accurate as there is a margin for error. That said some "clear" diagnosis may be and a small number not.

Post operative monitoring is usually by monitoring PSA tests.

A less than 0.01 parts per million (ppm) reading means that no PSA was found down to but not below 0.01ppm - so a less than 0.01ppm cannot say if there is any PSA between 0.01ppm and absolute zero (ie 0.00) ppm, which if there are you cannot tell unless or until any that are there build up to 0.01ppm and perhaps higher.

Prostate cancer feeds on testosterone and if the prosate is removed any significant or increasing levels of PSA is indicative or remaining and/or active cancer which will require more attention from the Urologist.

I am reliably informed by an Oncologist that CT/CAT and MRI scans may not detect cancers or tumors of less than 3 or 6mm so there is a potential for a lot not to be found at that stage.

I hope your incontinence clears up soon.


".........my remaining sphincter was stretched out for a long period of time and probably strained each time I involuntarily clamped down on the catheter."

If you have one sphincter you are in the same position as women who only have one as opposed to men who have not had there prostate removed (it takes the upper sphincter with it) who have two.

This is only a layman's impression of how it is.

It is part of regular discussions among some older groups of males where prostate cancer is a concern.

Weston Bye
02-22-2012, 06:53 AM
Thus endeth the lesson.

Tiffie has accurately and articulately stated the common knowledge concerning Prostate Cancer - unusual for one not personally afflicted with the malady. However, due to the variability in individual cases and surgical philosophy, there is one minor exception:

My surgeon told me well before the operation that due to the aggressiveness of my particular cancer, he intended to cut wide into (hopefully) healthy tissue, including lymph nodes and seminal vesicles. I presume that this was minimize the possibility of stray cancer cells in the debris field, rather than having to go back after the initial pathology report during the 3-1/2 hour operation and do further clean up.

All that being said, the final proof is In the follow-up PSA tests - tests plural, because the cancer, even with careful surgery has some probability of recurrence. Stay tuned.

John Stevenson
02-22-2012, 07:20 AM
Stay tuned.

What channel ? or should that be canal ?

Your Old Dog
02-22-2012, 07:56 AM
Weston, good to read you and see you on the mend. Lot of folks walking around in your situation and doing okay. With respect to my mangled ankles I just tell myself it could have been much worse. We adapt and the sense of humor seems to help. All the best. Ray.......

Black Forest
02-22-2012, 10:11 AM
Weston, That picture was great!

As to those that stated "they are all pullin for ya" I ain't pullin nothing even closely related to, in and around your prostate or former prostate location!

But do get well and back to full power.

hardtail
02-22-2012, 03:54 PM
The big drawback of road trips with the wife is having to stop all the time for bathroom breaks. (might have something to do with the water bottle clutched in one hand). I thought about drilling a hole in the floor combined with a catheter for her. I'll call it a car-theter.

A female coworker recently volunteered a story about her childhood, her Dad had a big Ford stationwagon for the family that had rusted through in one place in the back. Being thrifty he fashioned a paint can over the hole and secured and sealed it all down to stop the infiltration of dust. His ingenuity didn't stop there however as he had cut out the bottom and while driving or long trips having 3 girls this was thier potty, pull the lid, squat and go.......all the while Ma and Pa endlessly chain smoking up front.........Could be an ad jingle........bathroom breaks don't slow you down.........He probably had other ideas and it tripled up for ice fishing?

The Artful Bodger
02-22-2012, 06:35 PM
Please note that I write this as a prostate cancer patient and is offered as information of my experience and as I understand it and not as the opinion of a medical professional.

I would like to mention that PSA is a natural substance and plays a part in procreation. It is produced by the prostate gland and can be detected in the blood giving an indication of stress on the prostate so a high PSA is not proof of cancer any more than a high engine temperature is proof of a blown head gasket. Nonetheless it is good practice for healthy men to get PSA counts so that a sudden increase can be detected and an explanation sought. Infections and changes in sexual frequency can both cause raised PSA. I suspect most prostate cancers are detected following high PSA readings, but once again, high PSA is not proof of prostate cancer.

If the prostate is totally removed by surgery there should be almost no PSA but if the cancer has spread the cancer cells have the nature of prostatic cells and will produce PSA. So a rising PSA after prostate removal surgery is a real warning sign.

It is different for those who have radiation treatment for prostate cancer as some of the gland often/usually remains so there is a detectable PSA. In their case the important thing is to monitor for sudden increases in the new 'normal' reading.

As OldTiffie mentioned, prostate glands are stimulated by testosterone and so are prostate cancer cells wherever they may be in the body. Drugs can suppress production of testosterone. Some patients are treated with both drugs and radiation.

In my case my PSA was 66 and Gleason score 8.5 with cancer on the outside of the gland ruling out surgery as a 'clean fix'. I had 6 months of hormone supression which reduced PSA to 9 at which time I had 35 sessions on the linear accelerator followed by another 18 months of hormone supression. 6 years later I can say that although I have almost all the side effects none of them were life changing and I didnt even loose one day at work.

Prostate cancer is a horrible way to go but is usually treatable if detected early enough and a PSA test is a valuable tool in that, so too is the rubber glove and the value of each is greatly enhanced by combining the two.

IMHO of course.

sasquatch
02-22-2012, 06:55 PM
Thanks Bodger, you have posted some good information there, FOR ALL OF US!!

No fooling with this you guys, get your'e PSA checked regularly, it's a simple blood test!!

WE ALL figure oh i'm too busy or whatever,, but remember "EVERONE" will eventually get prostrate cancer, yes,, even your'e doctor or surgeon,, so take time to get that PSA level checked.

Would you keep driving your'e car,, wondering if the oil level was low!!

No, you'd check it!! Same with the PSA level!!

charlz
02-22-2012, 10:50 PM
Maybe you will get a 'golden opportunity' to work the punch line from this old joke into a conversation:

One day the teacher called little Johnny to the front of the class and asked him to recite the alphabet.

Little Johnny managed to stammer out: "A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O Q R S T U V W X Y and Z!"

"But Johnny, you forgot the P!" said the teacher.

To which he replied, "No I didn't, it's running down my leg!"


:rolleyes: ;)

Good luck on your continued recovery!