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darryl
02-18-2012, 02:18 AM
Read this somewhere today or last night, can't remember where, but it was a product endorsement of some dubious value- 'TOTALLY water resistant'

What's that supposed to mean?:) Like, really------- dude.

I heard a newsperson say that today, something about the antiques theft problem at a greek museum- they got 'totally ripped off' Hmm, from the pictures I could see there was some stuff left-

Weather report for the next few days here- 'it's totally going to rain'

winchman
02-18-2012, 02:32 AM
They're trying to keep from saying basically.

madwilliamflint
02-18-2012, 07:30 AM
To wit: http://mpwilson.com/2012/01/23/the-most-aggressively-inarticulate-generation/

PixMan
02-18-2012, 07:46 AM
To wit: http://mpwilson.com/2012/01/23/the-most-aggressively-inarticulate-generation/

I really liked that. It is an articulate way of expressing how I've felt about this for years now.

You know what I'm saying?

madwilliamflint
02-18-2012, 08:31 AM
I really liked that. It is an articulate way of expressing how I've felt about this for years now.

You know what I'm saying?

Yeah I've gotten to the point where I'll just bark at people when they're doing that. "It's a YES or NO question." I start sounding like Judge Judy "Uhm isn't an answer."

john hobdeclipe
02-18-2012, 08:37 AM
It's like, I mean, you know, communication is where it's at.

flathead4
02-18-2012, 08:54 AM
'TOTALLY water resistant'

Forget "totally." Define "water resistant." The phrase means little without qualification.

Tom

wierdscience
02-18-2012, 09:26 AM
You know what I'm saying?

Fo shizzle!

Lew Hartswick
02-18-2012, 10:44 AM
It's as bad as interrupting in the middle of a question with an answer
that doesn't have anything to do with the question.
When in the course of a discussion, two or more of the participants
start jabbering at the same time, I just tune out and leave or in the
case of TV, turn off. :-(
...lew...

Black_Moons
02-18-2012, 11:59 AM
"Would you like A or B" "Yes" "....... I hate you"

justanengineer
02-18-2012, 12:08 PM
Unfortunately we simply must accept the fact that there are a vast number of people today that absolutely do not care how they sound, look, or act because they are "individuals," "special," etc. and someone has always taken care of (read - paid for) their lack of caring. Personally, I would rather fit in (to the small extent that I can) and make a lot of money/be successful in life than be in that "other" crowd.

The place I tend to notice the stupidity of this population most is during interviews at work, the one place where I should hope to see it least. While I too question if even semi-proper English is taught anymore, there are some things that to me are even worse. For some reason, many of the younger "professionals" today seem to mistake "cargo" pants for dress pants, and at my office "inappropriate" dress during an interview is considered an automatic disqualification by most. Cargo pants (usually with bulging pockets) + dress shirt and suit jacket do not equal professional attire IMHO, and neither do sneakers. If someone is interviewing for a job on the plant floor, that is one thing, but an engineering office is completely different. My other personal favorite - if every single parking lot has multiple, large "no-tobacco facility/grounds" signs in them, and they are also on every single outside door, do not even ask if you can have a smoking break during an interview. Moreover, when verbally told our facility has a no tobacco policy, do not argue and tell us that we have to provide a place for it....simple common sense - look sharp and dont offend the corporate culture during an interview.

lynnl
02-18-2012, 12:15 PM
I believe it's important to always seek clarification in our spoken communication, to insure there's no misunderstanding between participants.

In the adjective form the word 'like' denotes a similarity, a strong resemblance, i.e. indistinguishable from, etc.

So when someones tells me that he/she " was, like totally surprised", I instantly seek clarification.... "Do you mean that you were indistinguishable from the modifier 'totally', or did you bear a strong resemblance to the word 'surprised'?"

Thruthefence
02-18-2012, 12:21 PM
You would think that "Totally" would imply "water proof", not just "resistant".

Mike Nash
02-18-2012, 12:32 PM
Read this somewhere today or last night, ...'
Who read this? Or do you want us to read it? ;)

Common things I have seen constantly on this forum:
Leaving out pronouns
Changing punctuation to some .. . . arbitrary, undefined personal code
Using lower case letters to start sentences
Simply using the wrong words, e.g., then for than, loose for lose, and more recently that for than. All real words with very different meanings.
Leaving out the negatives, e.g. "It's like I was picking my nose or anything."I'm sure it's just me, but inappropriate use of "totally" seems pretty tame by comparison from a bunch of people trying to work to thousandths of an inch or hundredths of a millimeter.

Sew Sioux me.

BTW, nothing personal darryl, you just gave me an opening I could not pass up. I'm also pretty sure there are problems with my post grammatically.

mklotz
02-18-2012, 12:39 PM
I'm with Mike on this one. Given the butchery of the English language one sees on a daily basis on this forum, the majority of you shouldn't be criticizing others.

madwilliamflint
02-18-2012, 12:44 PM
Unfortunately we simply must accept the fact that there are a vast number of people today that absolutely do not care how they sound, look, or act because they are "individuals," "special," etc. and someone has always taken care of (read - paid for) their lack of caring.

No. We mustn't.

gizmo2
02-18-2012, 01:00 PM
Our workplace has taken a turn for the worse; we hired a young lady for the front counter/phone. She is pleasant, personable, conscientious, and good with customers. But she can't shut up. I was taught to take turns when speaking. She never stops talking, even if she has asked a direct question. I find it hard to be in the same room with her. Another new hire lives on his cell phone; you have to poke him to get his attention, and he will make you wait while he finishes his 'on line' chat. Obviously, I do not run this establishment...

Evan
02-18-2012, 01:03 PM
Aggressively inarticulate is an excellent characterisation of the lack of care and attention with which many people currently speak and write.

I doubt that it is a new phenomenon. What makes it seem so is the ease with which such carelessness may be inflicted on others beyond those with whom one is actually conversing. Writing is defined as speech in the US constitution. There is even less excuse to inflict careless and unintelligible writing on those with whom we communicate. Writing provides the time necessary for careful consideration of the terms we use and the application of proper grammar.

However, it is more work to speak and write with care. At times it is necessary or at least well recommended. The act of omission created by not taking such care must of necessity reflect on the attitudes and possibly the educational competence of those who fail to take such care.

All that said, there is a difference between conversational language and Correct and Proper language. There's room for abbreviation and colloquialisms, doncha know? Eh? Just sayin.

mklotz
02-18-2012, 01:22 PM
Abbreviations and colloquialisms aren't the problem, Evan. It's things like...

pluralization with apostrophes (photo's)
wrong verb forms (had went, have ran)
absence of punctuation and capitalization
homophone confusion (they're/their/there, your/you're)
dangling un-needed prepositions (mix up, where it's at)
run together sentences
an obvious, stubborn unwillingness to proofread or use a spell checker

and a myriad of other creative butcheries that make posts read like something written by a fifth grader.

Informal writing isn't (or at least shouldn't be) sloppy writing.

tdmidget
02-18-2012, 02:32 PM
It's like, I mean, you know, communication is where it's at.

Don't you, like, mean "communication is ,like, where it's at?"

winchman
02-18-2012, 03:09 PM
My all time favorite for a phrase that makes you sound uneducated is "...at a high rate of speed".

Oldbrock
02-18-2012, 03:24 PM
I firmly believe that if someone lacks the skill to communicate the very least they should do is to shut up.

john hobdeclipe
02-18-2012, 03:46 PM
Abbreviations and colloquialisms aren't the problem, Evan. It's things like...

pluarlization with apostrophes (photo's)
.....


Spelling is often a problem, two.

michigan doug
02-18-2012, 04:04 PM
The rate at which language skills are declining in the U.S. nicely approximates a geometric progression. If we continue on this path, pretty soon, nobody will understand anybody.

I know that the elders complain about the liberties that the younger folk take with the language, and I am an elder now. But I also know that we are losing something critically important.

The language skills I acquired from two fairly demanding english teachers in high school were good enough to land me a job at a newspaper some years later. I am embarrassed at what passes for english these days.

Finest regards,

doug

aboard_epsilon
02-18-2012, 04:07 PM
QUOTE JACK HOFFMAN

"There ain't nothing that cant be done about it."

now that's a phrase that is often spoken on the hillbilly American reality shows ..and it's catching.

after watching these shows I'm beginning to talk like them ..

"and i tell you what " ( there's another)...........the more i say those phrases .......it's not long before others pick it up from me and they are saying it back to me.

it's still miles better than text speak.

all the best..markj

Lew Hartswick
02-18-2012, 04:16 PM
I firmly believe that if someone lacks the skill to communicate the very least they should do is to shut up.
I love that. :-)

Hey everyone! Is the use of "smileys" allowed?
...lew...

nctox
02-18-2012, 04:34 PM
My all time favorite for a phrase that makes you sound uneducated is "...at a high rate of speed".

Or "At this point in time.":D

Weston Bye
02-18-2012, 04:41 PM
I remarked on another thread, when people were beginning to nitpick each others (other's?) posts, that this BBS wasn't a legal document or a college dissertation. The guys here are (mostly) reasonably intelligent and literate, and even those who aren't are able to get their ideas across.

We are here because we are machinists, or want to be, not English Majors.

My high school English teachers, who only begrudgingly gave me the minimum passing grades, would be astonished to learn that I rose to the level of a magazine writer.

My articles benefit from careful proofreading. My posts here, a little less.

jstinem
02-18-2012, 04:58 PM
Upon My oath and honour I heard, today, a DJ say,on the air:

"Come on down and enter the Miss Tennessee Cornhole contest!"!!

Now I know that the "Cornhole contest" probably involves throwing beanbags through holes in a sloping plywood tables. At least, I really hope that what it is.

Does this happen to everybody who gets as old as I am or is it just me?

Joe

lynnl
02-18-2012, 05:07 PM
Or "At this point in time.":D

More often it's "..at this PARTICULAR point in time.."

When I hear someone add "fluff" words like that I mentally label him/her a blowhard. Why not just say "now"? Three simple letters, instead of six words.

Mike Nash
02-18-2012, 05:34 PM
I remarked on another thread, when people were beginning to nitpick each others (other's?) posts, that this BBS wasn't a legal document or a college dissertation. The guys here are (mostly) reasonably intelligent and literate, and even those who aren't are able to get their ideas across.
I fully agree. I'm not offended by occassional typos and regional differences in language usage, or even those that simply have trouble with writing. If someone is too regional I usually just add them to my ignore list simply because I have no idea what they are saying. Those tend to be folks from somewhere far away from where I live and I have no dispute with them.

My "pet peeve" is that some of the word switches that are occurring are so prevalent that I am actually seeing the wrong word used more often than the correct one. When I see the word lose used properly in a sentence I have been pausing to reread the sentence because it has started looking wrong. This is true with than also. I have found myself wanting to post replies just thanking people for posts that use words that match their definitions. The substituted words are not even homynyms! <--- That's not even a word, but Google has about 13,700 hits on this!

If no one is allowed to differ for fear of being shouted down, then everyone suffers. Repeat something often enough and it becomes the new normal. Our newspaper had gotten terrible about using the wrong words (we canceled). Online media is the same. Most things posted by Joe Public even worse.

Hopefully, if someone starts talking about micrometers being percussion instruments, someone will be allowed to correct them. Why not with other terms?

And if someone has proven to be too lazy to bother with grammar at all...

I didn't do all that well with language skills in school either, and I had to double check quite a few words in this post, but that's the cost of caring about our future. I have actually noticed that non-US posters tend to make fewer word choice mistakes.

mklotz
02-18-2012, 05:46 PM
... I have actually noticed that non-US posters tend to make fewer word choice mistakes.

Non-native English speakers have to make a commitment to LEARN English. Native speakers often think they know how to speak the language and therefore there is no need for them to study the subject. This attitude is painfully apparent among high-school students.

fixerdave
02-18-2012, 06:30 PM
Spelling is often a problem, two.

I can't believe that it's been two hours and not one single responder has responded to this response too :D

What? Am I feeding the trolls? Is this usage of 'two' some obscure grammatical form that has somehow been excluded from my education? Am I falling prey to a grammar-nazi trap? Oh dear, this is, like, getting difficult... ., totally.

Arcane
02-18-2012, 06:31 PM
Abbreviations and colloquialisms aren't the problem, Evan. It's things like...

pluralization with apostrophes (photo's)
wrong verb forms (had went, have ran)
absence of punctuation and capitalization
homophone confusion (they're/their/there, your/you're)
dangling un-needed prepositions (mix up, where it's at)
run together sentences
an obvious, stubborn unwillingness to proofread or use a spell checker

and a myriad of other creative butcheries that make posts read like something written by a fifth grader.

Informal writing isn't (or at least shouldn't be) sloppy writing.


You could have simplified your answer by condensing it into one word: AIRSMITH! :D

sasquatch
02-18-2012, 06:35 PM
Well,,,, all i gotta say is, we may be illiteratt but we ain't no dummies, where good at what we doo!!!:p :D

darryl
02-18-2012, 07:17 PM
Like, totally!

BigMike782
02-18-2012, 07:51 PM
Whatever....

mich_88_13
02-18-2012, 08:09 PM
It's a form of stuttering kinda like when someone says "like... like... like.." They don't have the vocabulary to say something less general. Or they didn't thank the sentience threw before speaking. Would be my guess.

darryl
02-18-2012, 08:13 PM
Wood be my guess- soary to have two coarect yoo

38_Cal
02-18-2012, 08:31 PM
More often it's "..at this PARTICULAR point in time.."

When I hear someone add "fluff" words like that I mentally label him/her a blowhard. Why not just say "now"? Three simple letters, instead of six words.
They're getting paid by the word!

David

john hobdeclipe
02-18-2012, 09:22 PM
Joking aside, I agree with Weston Bye, in that we should not waste too much of our time nitpicking one another's spelling, grammar or punctuation. This is, after all, a forum dedicated to working with machines and metal, not ivory tower literary pursuits. I can think of a number of members here whose writing may leave a bit to be desired, but whose contributions are valuable, at least to me. I certainly don't want any of them to leave just because someone insulted their punctuation.

That said, I do have a suggestion or two, not just directed to members of this or any other forum but for people in general who need to learn a bit about effective communication:

Leave off the slang. Write and speak precisely, using the exact words and phrases that accurately portray your thoughts and visions.

Especially, leave off the private slang that you've made up, and that nobody else has ever heard of.

Forget the abbreviations and acronyms that may make sense to you but are meaningless to others.

And finally, my big gripe: Forget the silly, childish texting talk, and communicate like an adult! How difficult is it write "for" instead of the numeral "4"? How much of your precious time do you really save by writing "u" instead of "you"? This kind of writing is the literary equivalent of walking down the street holding your pants up because you're (not "ur") too stupid to wear a belt, and gains for you about as much respect.



Whew, I feel better now.

Mike Nash
02-18-2012, 09:28 PM
The substituted words are not even homynyms! <--- That's not even a word, but Google has about 13,700 hits on this!
Honest, I googled "homynyms" originally and missed the proper spelling. When I went to look up a different homonym I caught my mistake because I remembered it seemed to be spelled oddly (like about 1/4 of the words in the English language).

And this class, is why trying to correct others is such a dangerous undertaking (unless you are a cop or judge, perhaps).

And speaking of looking words up... I looked up "fart" in one of those massive reference dictionaries (Thorndike-Barnhart maybe?) in the reference room of the library in high school once - "a small explosion between the knees". That never even made sense, but it was funny.

Doozer
02-18-2012, 10:23 PM
deba-deba-deba,
dat's all folks.

It was all down hill from Porky Pig.

I try only to speak the King's English.

The first George Bush invented the word, "Gentler".
"Kinder, gentler America".
Now Tylenol says,"...gentler to your stomach than aspirin.
Ridiculous.

I also heard,"He's the winningest driver in nascar.
Also ridiculous.

And, "Deplane the aircraft when we land".
Absolute crap.

--Doozer

Lew Hartswick
02-18-2012, 10:34 PM
You could have simplified your answer by condensing it into one word: AIRSMITH! :D

:-) The only one on my "ignore" list. :-)
...lew...

flylo
02-19-2012, 12:23 AM
I was ticked at sears & typed in sears sucks in yahoo search & got 5,250,000 hits. I guess I'm not the only one.

vpt
02-20-2012, 08:59 AM
10 years from now I can see our president saying something like "Dude, we are so totally gonna win this war"

Peter S
02-20-2012, 07:12 PM
10 years from now I can see our president saying something like "Dude, we are so totally gonna win this war"

vpt,

They made a film about it - Idiocracy. It's disturbingly good (be warned it's crass and vulgar, but that's the point :eek: ).

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0387808/

The House of Representin': http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GFyUvlfZ8j0&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fMkrJOOTjj4&feature=related

1-800miner
02-20-2012, 11:24 PM
I sure like playing in the shop,cause I don't have to talk or write very much when I am there.:o

torker
02-21-2012, 06:04 AM
That's just random! (What the kids say now)_ (Seems to apply to ANYTHING) Nope...I don't get that one either...

Black Forest
02-21-2012, 07:14 AM
The only time that I can remember critisizing anyone on here (grammatically) was for not using a period between sentences. I have a hard time to read a post written without periods.

I fall into the group that thought because English is my native language I didn't need to study English.

Does anyone on this forum understand Shaekespeare?

Also how do I turn on the spelling checker in Firefox?