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Paul Alciatore
02-27-2012, 01:10 AM
I have promised to make a couple of spring loaded, slide bolts for a baby crib. My shop is in storage so I am using hand tools. No lathe. No mill. Not even a power saw so keep your comments to saw, drill, and file work.

My idea is to use a piece of square aluminum tube for the frame and make a bolt to slide inside it. Need to cut a slot in one side for the handle to pass through and a small block for the spring to sit on at one end. The handle would be a screw with a spacer (hollow aluminum tube) on it: it would be screwed into a threaded hole in the bolt. It needs to be quite tight and firmly locked into place so there is no chance that the baby could get it loose and swallow it. I am thinking of some kind of thread locking compound.

OK, so assuming that the outside tube is aluminum and the motion is hand operated and definitely slow speed, what would be a good choice for the slide bolt so that it will operate freely inside that aluminum tube? Oh, did I mention that there should be no lubrication or at best perhaps a light coat of wax, but definitely nothing that could get into the baby's mouth.

My first thought was steel, but if I start with a 3/4" steel round and try to file it down to 5/8" square, that might be a bit of work. OK, how about brass? Or some plastic? Or just aluminum? Keep in mind that the steel screw of the handle would have to be locked in the threaded hole in it so slippery plastic seems to be a poor choice.

And yes, I know that filing a 3/4 round to 5/8 square will leave some of the original round at the corners, but that is OK by me.

darryl
02-27-2012, 01:21 AM
If you used uhmw, you could drill and tap a hole for a bolt, run that in so the head is flush, then use loctite to hold a handle onto the exposed part of the bolt. Whether or not this would be a bonus- if you turned the handle, the bolt would back out and lock the uhmw piece inside the tubing, or it could back the bolt out into a hole in the other side. Either way it could help prevent an easy sliding of the uhmw.

kitno455
02-27-2012, 07:06 AM
Dont have a handle protruding from the side, If the kid gets older and learns to climb out of the crib, they might get caught on it on the way down. Instead, use a slot in the tube and a finger hole in the 'piston'. You will have to use a fairly light spring, and might consider some teflon tape to line the cylinder, or make the piston from UHMW-PE.

But, even with all those precautions, I would not make this job, even for family. The crib recalls for suffocation and maiming of the past few years have cured me of any desire to work on baby stuffs.

allan

Black_Moons
02-27-2012, 11:25 AM
But, even with all those precautions, I would not make this job, even for family. The crib recalls for suffocation and maiming of the past few years have cured me of any desire to work on baby stuffs.

allan

Haha I know what you mean.. I had to make a steel counterweight block for a toy crane I got for my brothers kid.. Im like.. Ok how do I make a block of steel safe? this isent gonna be good if he gets a hold of it.. I should... uhhhh................... Well, Long story short, I ended up sanding all the mill scale off it, grinding the corners round, And hot glueing it into the crane (did'nt stick but oh well), And did'nt paint it as I wasent sure if any paints where less toxic then steel :)

Steels.. Safe to gnaw on right?

Paul Alciatore
02-27-2012, 01:47 PM
Dont have a handle protruding from the side, If the kid gets older and learns to climb out of the crib, they might get caught on it on the way down. Instead, use a slot in the tube and a finger hole in the 'piston'. You will have to use a fairly light spring, and might consider some teflon tape to line the cylinder, or make the piston from UHMW-PE.

But, even with all those precautions, I would not make this job, even for family. The crib recalls for suffocation and maiming of the past few years have cured me of any desire to work on baby stuffs.

allan

Humm, I hadn't thought of that. Probably because I started with a 1/2" square tube. But after seeing the actual rail, I found that 3/4" square is more in line so a finger hole may just work. I can increase the size of the cutout for ease of access. That should work. And it decreases the parts count and makes assembly easier. Great! This board is a great source of knowledge.

As for the fear of lawsuits, if my daughter sues me she will have to support me in my poverty. She will not get enough from the lawsuit to pay for that. I would not take on the job for any others. Isn't our modern world just wonderful?

Thanks all.

kitno455
02-27-2012, 05:42 PM
Humm, I hadn't thought of that. Probably because I started with a 1/2" square tube. But after seeing the actual rail, I found that 3/4" square is more in line so a finger hole may just work. I can increase the size of the cutout for ease of access. That should work. And it decreases the parts count and makes assembly easier. Great! This board is a great source of knowledge.

As for the fear of lawsuits, if my daughter sues me she will have to support me in my poverty. She will not get enough from the lawsuit to pay for that. I would not take on the job for any others. Isn't our modern world just wonderful?

Thanks all.

It has naught to do with lawsuits. If you injure a small child, it WILL keep you up at night.

allan

rohart
02-27-2012, 07:15 PM
Well, my view is that if a baby has the time to investigate this mechanism, unscrew part of it and make hay, then it's already been neglected, which I'm sure will not be the case.

If you're making the handle out of a setscrew, filing it smooth, then leave a little of the hex. Don't tap the hole through, and leave it so a good tight wrenching is needed to get the bolt to jam into the thread.

Then, unless this baby has access to more tools than you do, which doesn't appear to be difficult, I have to say, then it should be fine.

Rich Carlstedt
02-27-2012, 11:05 PM
Paul
I sent a PM but your box is full
Rich

Paul Alciatore
02-28-2012, 01:47 AM
Paul
I sent a PM but your box is full
Rich

Rich, I emptied my box. Sorry about that.

bruto
02-28-2012, 10:04 AM
Well, my view is that if a baby has the time to investigate this mechanism, unscrew part of it and make hay, then it's already been neglected, which I'm sure will not be the case.

If you're making the handle out of a setscrew, filing it smooth, then leave a little of the hex. Don't tap the hole through, and leave it so a good tight wrenching is needed to get the bolt to jam into the thread.

Then, unless this baby has access to more tools than you do, which doesn't appear to be difficult, I have to say, then it should be fine.Even non neglected babies wake up at odd times, and a baby can get into a huge amount of trouble in an amzingly short time.

If the barrel is going to be square, you could put a small protruding knob or screw on either the top or bottom, where it's accessible but won't be caught accidentally.

The biggest risk here, I think, is from a baby outside the crib. Drop front crib latches were notorious for being accidentally released by a crawling baby. Make sure that whatever you use is either strong enough or complicated enough that the designated baby cannot release it by accident.