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metalmagpie
03-26-2012, 09:17 PM
I got handed an engineering drawing today, which could turn into some work. It calls for structural steel reinforcements in a badly built basement. He called out the term "walin" (not a typo, w - a - l - i - n) in several places. I am unfamiliar with this term (not surprising, not being a structural engineer) so I turned to a web search. It appears that 'walin' can refer to a special kind of beam, apparently like an H-beam but with two crossbars; or it can refer to a kind of clamp.

Can any of you shed any light? He calls out a walin every time a horizontal beam (which might be a walin beam) intersects with a vertical steel column.

metalmagpie

oldtiffie
03-26-2012, 09:44 PM
http://www.google.com.au/#hl=en&sugexp=frgbld&gs_nf=1&pq=whailing&cp=10&gs_id=3f&xhr=t&q=wailing+beam&pf=p&rlz=1W1IRFC_enAU360&sclient=psy-ab&oq=wailing+be&aq=&aqi=&aql=&gs_l=&pbx=1&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.r_qf.,cf.osb&fp=651853729f5a5b0a&biw=1280&bih=523

LKeithR
03-27-2012, 12:09 AM
Never heard of the term and I've seen lots of structural drawings. Best get a clarification from the engineer himself...

oldtiffie
03-27-2012, 03:42 AM
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/4/43/Excavation-timbering.png

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shoring

http://www.google.com.au/search?q=trench+supports&hl=en&rlz=1W1IRFC_enAU360&prmd=imvns&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=6WxxT9vRJs2UiAer663kDw&sqi=2&ved=0CEsQsAQ&biw=1920&bih=785

http://www.google.com.au/#hl=en&sugexp=frgbld&gs_nf=1&cp=14&gs_id=1k&xhr=t&q=trench+supports&pf=p&output=search&sclient=psy-ab&oq=trench+support&aq=&aqi=&aql=&gs_l=&pbx=1&rlz=1W1IRFC_enAU360&fp=1&biw=1920&bih=785&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.r_qf.,cf.osb&cad=b

Black_Moons
03-27-2012, 04:33 AM
I am unfamiliar with this term (not surprising, not being a structural engineer) so I turned to a web search. It appears that 'walin' can refer to a special kind of beam, apparently like an H-beam but with two crossbars; or it can refer to a kind of clamp.

metalmagpie

Since you have stated you already searched this, it would be silly and a waste of your time to refer you to google/wikipedia, I will suggest you ask the engineer himself. This is a project where random guessing won't cut it and could get you in trouble. He might even be using the term incorrectly.

The real trick will be asking it in the proper way that does not make either party feel/look foolish.

While going over the drawings, maybe casually ask "So, Walin beams are to be used here, here and here and I beams elsewhere?"

Frank46
03-27-2012, 04:42 AM
I'm thinking that the walin is to be used to tie in both the horizontzl beam with the cross beams as one unit. Our docks were steel plate covered with 14x14" x20' long beams, then an additional set of round poles made from trees were driven into the ground on the outside face of the dock. Once that was done every whaler (that's what we called them ) was connected to the horizontal beams. This is usually what the docked ship rested against. The outside corners of the docks were protected by a bunch of poles also driven into the ground and held together by wire rope. The method of connection was nothing more than a very long and large screw set in place with a pneumatic drill, it was literally screwed together. We had a tanker come in one night to tie up to a pier in the next fuel farm past us. Unfortunately he struck our dock. The tanker's bulbous bow rammed through all the wood and concrete. Even had a piece of 14x14" whaler stuck in the bulbous bow due to the force of the collision. Looked kinda funny sticking out like it did. Vessels master denied hitting our dock. Then we showed him the pic of his now no longer watertight bulbous bow with the piece of our dock stuck in it. Opps, got off on a tangent here. Frank

winchman
03-27-2012, 12:21 PM
I've always found it best to admit that you're unfamiliar with a term if you're not sure what it means. You've already proven it's not a common term, so there's no upside to pretending you know what it means and no downside to admitting you don't.

What you DON'T want is:

You: "So, Walin beams are to be used here, here and here and I beams elsewhere?"

Engineer: "Yes."

You: "Well, uh, what's a walin?"

Please let us know what the engineer means by the term.

kendall
03-27-2012, 01:06 PM
OldTiffies's post demonstrates the use of the term as I'm familiar with it.

It's a beam used to equalize pressure from spreaders.

In OldTiffies image, you could either use a spreader for each vertical, or a single waler and fewer spreaders.
(the gunnel on a boat is from gun wale, which is a beam/board used to spread a load along the side of the boat in the same manner. Not sure if wale is a nautical term adopted for land use or if it went the other way around)

metalmagpie
03-27-2012, 02:40 PM
Well, Frank, here in the Puget Sound area, where we take ferryboats all the time, the term for pilings driven into the ground and fastened together to absorb the horizontal force of a ship docking is "dolphins".


I'm thinking that the walin is to be used to tie in both the horizontzl beam with the cross beams as one unit. Our docks were steel plate covered with 14x14" x20' long beams, then an additional set of round poles made from trees were driven into the ground on the outside face of the dock. Once that was done every whaler (that's what we called them ) was connected to the horizontal beams. This is usually what the docked ship rested against. The outside corners of the docks were protected by a bunch of poles also driven into the ground and held together by wire rope. The method of connection was nothing more than a very long and large screw set in place with a pneumatic drill, it was literally screwed together. We had a tanker come in one night to tie up to a pier in the next fuel farm past us. Unfortunately he struck our dock. The tanker's bulbous bow rammed through all the wood and concrete. Even had a piece of 14x14" whaler stuck in the bulbous bow due to the force of the collision. Looked kinda funny sticking out like it did. Vessels master denied hitting our dock. Then we showed him the pic of his now no longer watertight bulbous bow with the piece of our dock stuck in it. Opps, got off on a tangent here. Frank

metalmagpie
03-27-2012, 02:41 PM
Fair enough. So which named part in oldtiffie's image is a spreader?


OldTiffies's post demonstrates the use of the term as I'm familiar with it.

It's a beam used to equalize pressure from spreaders.

In OldTiffies image, you could either use a spreader for each vertical, or a single waler and fewer spreaders.
(the gunnel on a boat is from gun wale, which is a beam/board used to spread a load along the side of the boat in the same manner. Not sure if wale is a nautical term adopted for land use or if it went the other way around)

metalmagpie
03-27-2012, 03:48 PM
Please let us know what the engineer means by the term.

I agree with you. I think it's better to admit ignorance, based on my longstanding belief that ignorance is way better than stupidity, being curable.

I took your advice and wrote to the engineer. He wrote, "A "waler" is just a term for a horizontal member that distributes load across a wall face (the term is also used to describe the members along the edge of a marine dock or pier)."

So that puts it to bed!

metalmagpie

Mike Burch
03-27-2012, 05:33 PM
OldTiffies's post demonstrates the use of the term as I'm familiar with it.

It's a beam used to equalize pressure from spreaders.

In OldTiffies image, you could either use a spreader for each vertical, or a single waler and fewer spreaders.
(the gunnel on a boat is from gun wale, which is a beam/board used to spread a load along the side of the boat in the same manner. Not sure if wale is a nautical term adopted for land use or if it went the other way around)

Kendall, "wale" is an alternative to "weal" a raised welt left on skin by a blow from a whip, etc. It comes from Old English "walu".
A wale on a ship is a is a raised bit of planking. So it looks as if the term was originally land-based, and borrowed for use in naval architecture.
None of which pedantry on my part helps the OP in in the slightest! Sorry about that.

TGTool
03-27-2012, 06:46 PM
And to meander further afield if the OP hadn't already found an answer to the question, one wonders if Bunny and the Wailers might have some useful input or if the might be a song explicating it in the repertoire of the Wailin' Jennys.

winchman
03-27-2012, 07:26 PM
"I took your advice and wrote to the engineer. He wrote, "A "waler" is ......"

Wait a minute, I thought the term that needed defining was "walin". Was that a typo on the drawing, and he meant "waler" all along?

cameron
03-27-2012, 09:23 PM
"Walin' " was probably how he pronounced waling.

elf
03-27-2012, 09:53 PM
Actually no one has answered the original question: What is a "walin"? Wailing, whaler, or whatever may or may not be the same as a walin :)

jkilroy
03-27-2012, 10:17 PM
Pretty sure the guy means Waler