PDA

View Full Version : The Ipswich Trip.



John Stevenson
04-15-2012, 05:30 PM
Posted in the bored thread about doing a trip to Ipswich to install a machine last week.

The machine in question was a Sieg SX3, same as the Grizzly G0619

http://www.grizzly.com/products/6-x-21-Mill-Drill/G0619

but with a longer table. The buyer lived in a first floor flat, that's 2nd floor for the cousins but when I rang him he said there was a lift in the building so it would be no problem.

So collected the machine and stand first thing Thursday morning and bombed down to Ipswich, about 140 miles. Punched the post code into the sat nav and got there with no problems.

The 'flat' turned out to be an old folks home ! quite posh and new.
Rang the bell and the guy came down, nice guy, probably about 80 but got all his marbles and he took us in and up to his flat. The foyer was all nice new exposed brick and carpets all over, lift was nice shiny stainless and not too big.

Short corridor to his room, carpeted, and then inside his room was a short passage way parallel to the corridor and into what I presume was a spare bedroom, what we would call a box room, what you would call a cupboard :D

Inside this room was 12 x 24 lathe, Mill/drill, tool and cutter brinder, benches on the other two walls, grinder and linisher, vise, bandsaw and pierce de resistance in the middle of the floor in the only space left, a medium sized 160 amp MiG welder with 1/2 size bottle !!!

He said he wanted the SX3 fitting at the end of the bench, bit tight but it would go. So me and small son carried the sheet metal stand out the Donald, up the lift and into the flat.

Went back and lifted the mill out the Donald and onto the hydraulic scissor lift and we were just wheeling this across the foyer carpet when the Matron came out and asked what we were doing.
I explained we were delivering this to the guys flat, she asked whether the floor would support the weight so straight faced I lied that he's had a previous machine [ the mill/ drill ] and this was the replacement.
Rather reluctantly she said OK and we went about the job. Dead tight into the lift and even tighter into the room.

Bolted to the stand, plugged in and tested and we left to go to Peter Neill's for a nice coffee with a very happy camper.

I have to ask myself just how well he gets on with his neighbours ?? :rolleyes:

Limy Sami
04-15-2012, 05:44 PM
I have to ask myself just how well he gets on with his neighbours ?? :rolleyes:

They're probably the erm?......... more hard of hearing;)

flylo
04-15-2012, 05:45 PM
There's me in several years (I hope). I'm keeping 1 small complete set of machines I can convert a bedroom into a complete small tooled shop just in case. Glad the old boy's still doing what he loves!

sasquatch
04-15-2012, 08:05 PM
Love that story , thanks for posting that!!

Good for the old fella, instead of sitting on his arse and fading away he's got projects on the go when he gets up each day!!

Good for him!! Excellent!!:D

tlfamm
04-15-2012, 08:10 PM
@John Stevenson: re "the Donald"

What strange Britishism be this?

In the colonies, the phrase refers to a particularly obnoxious real estate developer ...

gcude
04-15-2012, 08:22 PM
I have to ask myself just how well he gets on with his neighbours ?? :rolleyes:


As I think someone else has said before ... I tend not to get cross with old coots. They have more experience at confrontations and they play dirty! :p

becksmachine
04-15-2012, 09:27 PM
@John Stevenson: re "the Donald"

What strange Britishism be this?

In the colonies, the phrase refers to a particularly obnoxious real estate developer ...

It's the van that he hauls himself and others in.

I do want to know how the honorary title was transferred to the new one?? :D

Dave

fredf
04-15-2012, 10:42 PM
It's the van that he hauls himself and others in.

I do want to know how the honorary title was transferred to the new one?? :D

Dave

for those on this side of the pond http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ryming_slang

Donald (Duck) = Truck

I hope I haven't given away a deep dark secret :-D

LKeithR
04-15-2012, 11:29 PM
I have to ask myself just how well he gets on with his neighbours ?? :rolleyes:

Being "mechanically inclined" I suspect we'd get along just fine. The thought of a welder in there would scare me though. Probably not an "approved" use, either...

The Artful Bodger
04-16-2012, 12:43 AM
Maybe he gets on just fine with the neighbours if he just collects machines and likes to keep them clean. BTW, I am not suggesting for a moment that would not be an appropriate activity in one's twilight years.

macona
04-16-2012, 12:49 AM
Being "mechanically inclined" I suspect we'd get along just fine. The thought of a welder in there would scare me though. Probably not an "approved" use, either...

Yeah, a mig machine is definitely a no-no. Tig would be no problem though.

darryl
04-16-2012, 01:20 AM
What- no water jet cutter?

John Stevenson
04-16-2012, 02:58 AM
Some years ago I went to visit a guy who also lived in a home, racking my brains to remember his name [ gets harder every day, something to do with aluminium saucepans but don't remember what ].

Anyway this guy Frank? used to be something quite big in model engineering, had a nice workshop and setup and did nice work.
Went into this home and had no workshop or access to one, I bought some gear off him that was in storage.

Having a coffee and got talking to him and asked him how he found the home. Surprisingly he said he liked it. Everything to hand, had company if he needed it or could be private if he wanted to. I asked did he miss his workshop and he said yes he missed pottering about but then told me he'd bought a computer and a copy of Solid Edge and was building models in that.

The showed me part of a traction engine he's done and it was fantastic, more like a photo than a drawing,shadows on the spokes etc.

Dry old bugger with a typical Brit sense of humour. He said two of his friends were building a 7 1/4" scale loco between them, one guy would make two parts of one thing and the other guy would do the same and they would swap parts, this way they could work faster.

Frank said he was further ahead than they were and he was building full size !! :D

Went back to the drawing of the scale model traction engine and touching me on the shoulder in a conspiratorial gesture, he said "You know what the best part of building this model was ? "

"I never broke one tap or drill !! :rolleyes:"

There is hope for all of us.

Enfield
04-16-2012, 03:08 AM
Great storey, reminds me of many years ago when I lived in the UK, all we had a was a small maisonet above a shop. But it did have an attic, so I built the workshop up there complete with Myford lathe and pillar drill :D

Blackadder
04-16-2012, 03:28 AM
I hope not of the residents in that home have pacemakers fitted ,that weld would reset them nicely


any way good luck to the fella


Have to remember that you do machine installs John how about three steps down narrow passage and four steps up and no room to swing a cat in the workshop

got plenty of cat to swing as the next door Goth has 7 of the scratchy bittey things

Stuart

Ilson

EVguru
04-16-2012, 04:44 AM
Sound like he's ideally placed to be approched by REMAP!

http://www.remap.org.uk/

EddyCurr
04-16-2012, 08:16 PM
This thread has given me a marvelous idea and I don't doubt it might be
somewhat original.

Senior's residences with shops.

I just bought a small drill press from an aged fellow whom has sold his home
and will shortly be moving into a condo unit. In retirement, he took up
wood working and he said that in earlier years he would head out to his
detached garage each morning after breakfast to putter until noon, come
in for a nibble and a nap and then resume work until dusk. Unfortunately,
his legs increasingly bother him - he is broad for his height and has to
navigate stairs to enter or leave the home. So goodbye to the shop and
off to the condo where he can drive into the parkade and ride the elevator
to his domicile. No longer with a purpose each day, what prospects ?

.

EddyCurr
04-16-2012, 08:22 PM
A quick, er, market survey shows there are some retirement homes equipped
with wood shops. Still yet to find one with metal equipment, though.

.

aboard_epsilon
04-16-2012, 08:29 PM
A quick, er, market survey shows there are some retirement homes equipped
with wood shops. Still yet to find one with metal equipment, though.

.

well the metalworking stuff is a lot safer than woodworking stuff ..when you're talking table saws , routers ,electric planers ,sharp chisels etc
not as noisy either

all the best.markj

EddyCurr
04-16-2012, 09:20 PM
Wood ..., metal ..., you and I both know all the equipment is dangerous in
one way or another.

The wood butchers would say that welding presents a fire hazard while
conveniently overlooking the problem of sawdust accumulation.

Eh, we're all going to die sooner or later. Might as well go out with a smile ...

Money spent on shop equipment, training and supervision would sure seem
a better use of funds than grounds keeping, Wii bowling hardware and
canasta sets.

.

Dan Dubeau
04-16-2012, 09:35 PM
our old condo in Toronto had a wood shop in the basement. Had everything I ever needed the few times i used it, but the guy running it was a bit of an ego maniac, and eventually I just moved some of my own tools up there and worked on my balcony. Much to the delight of my neighbors.

There's a guy in the home my Mom's in that has a little shop setup. just some small woodworking hand tools, and a drill press. I'd guess he's into his 80's and keeps plugging away making little wooden model engines, and signs and such.

sasquatch
04-16-2012, 10:14 PM
So good to hear a few of these old timers are still allowed to get a few machines in to tinker with, sure gotta help to keep their minds clearer, along with feeling they're still able to accomplish things.

Seems so many just go there to die.

Black_Moons
04-16-2012, 10:21 PM
Wood ..., metal ..., you and I both know all the equipment is dangerous in
one way or another.

The wood butchers would say that welding presents a fire hazard while
conveniently overlooking the problem of sawdust accumulation.

Eh, we're all going to die sooner or later. Might as well go out with a smile ...

Money spent on shop equipment, training and supervision would sure seem
a better use of funds than grounds keeping, Wii bowling hardware and
canasta sets.

.
Exactly. Why would you stop doing something you love just because you are old and it is 'risky'? What do you plan on living for? TV shows?

My grandpa nearly cut his hand in half with his radial arm saw a few years back. His hand was put back together but is basically non functional as anything more then a pushing device and has no grip. He is left handed and it was his left hand that was injured.

He still works in his shop now and then. Just a lot slower at it. He is a great craftsman and I am in total support of him continuing to work in his shop till his very last day, As much or as little as he desires. If he dies one day in his shop I doubt he would have any regret other then the mess he leaves.

What good is retirement if you can't do what you want?

Toolguy
04-16-2012, 10:39 PM
I view retirement not as spending all day in a rocking chair but rather a transition going from what I have to do to what I want to do.:) Not that I'll ever get there, but that's another issue.:rolleyes:

EddyCurr
04-16-2012, 11:15 PM
Instead of the home's bus hauling guests to the local mall or nearest big box
store (as happens here), the trips could be to scrap yards, metal marts,
hardware outlets and so on ...

.

mike4
04-17-2012, 04:29 AM
This thread has given me a marvelous idea and I don't doubt it might be
somewhat original.

Senior's residences with shops.

I just bought a small drill press from an aged fellow whom has sold his home
and will shortly be moving into a condo unit. In retirement, he took up
wood working and he said that in earlier years he would head out to his
detached garage each morning after breakfast to putter until noon, come
in for a nibble and a nap and then resume work until dusk. Unfortunately,
his legs increasingly bother him - he is broad for his height and has to
navigate stairs to enter or leave the home. So goodbye to the shop and
off to the condo where he can drive into the parkade and ride the elevator
to his domicile. No longer with a purpose each day, what prospects ?

.
Not what I would look forward to , I prefer machines for company , no arguments.
Michael

vincemulhollon
04-17-2012, 08:39 AM
They're probably the erm?......... more hard of hearing;)

My strategy in my youthful apartment years ago was to hammer together a bookcase or desk or table or whatever at noon on Saturday until nosey-neighbor complained to the manager who felt obligated to advise me that he appreciated I waited and did "loud" work at noon, etc, but he's got a complaint, blah blah. Eventually he got tired of going thru the motions, he just tossed out the complaints of nosey-neighbor upon receipt on the assumption she was crazy and/or had it out for me (cannot exclude that possibility, anyway). That was my freedom to do whatever I wanted at 2am. Not that I did so often, but it was nice knowing I could...

Being an otherwise model resident helped too.

vincemulhollon
04-17-2012, 08:48 AM
Senior's residences with shops..

Look up what a "hackerspace" is, and find the apartment building across the street or next door or whatever. I have a long way to go until I get there, but when I do get old, that's where I'm gonna be. My ideal retirement apartment would have a bar on one side, a hackerspace on the other side, and a grocery store across the street. I'd be pretty happy with that...

I currently don't do the hackerspace thing, because my basement is far better equipped in my specific hobbies than the local hackerspace. I've seen pictures of their rusty bridgeport knee mill with no apparent tooling, and I recall seeing a halfway decent welder on their website.

philbur
04-17-2012, 02:06 PM
He'll have you back in six months to convert it to CNC.:eek:

Phil:)


The machine in question was a Sieg SX3, .........
The 'flat' turned out to be an old folks home ! quite posh and new.
Rang the bell and the guy came down, nice guy, probably about 80 but got all his marbles and he took us in and up to his flat.

camdigger
04-17-2012, 02:46 PM
He'll have you back in six months to convert it to CNC.:eek:

Phil:)


Or take it back because someone complained....:rolleyes:

EddyCurr
04-17-2012, 04:18 PM
Look up what a "hackerspace" is, Here is the one in my community: Edmonton New Technology Society (aka: ENTS) (http://www.ents.ca/wiki/Main_Page)

They are currently developing a new space and are well along on their way
judging by the photos here on Flicker (http://www.flickr.com/photos/47126591@N05/).

Although I've known about the group for perhaps a year, I had only browsed
their site and photos of the previous location. Earlier this spring, I took a
couple of friends on a journey to the original location intending to have a tour,
only to discover that they had moved out.

Unfortunately, neither the first location or the new one are senior-friendly.
Far too many stairs.

At a Seniors residence, it would be NBD to appropriate or construct a suitable
space with easy access for those with mobility issues.

.

sasquatch
04-17-2012, 06:07 PM
Eddy thanks for posting that sight, an interesting read, and lots of photos, that is a HUGE building!!!

Catshooter
04-17-2012, 06:13 PM
Good for him, good for him.

I do wonder though how much weight he has on that floor? England get earthquakes?


Cat

Blackadder
04-18-2012, 03:40 AM
yep we had the pictures swinging on the wall a few years ago,
now dont get this wrong but we woke up and if felt as if the bed was moving well it was due to a earth quake it only lasted about 30 seconds though



Stuart