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dian
04-23-2012, 02:15 PM
i believe the moglice patent is well known, the problem is getting the ingrediens.

i find this works quite well:

take some epoxy, add some stp (oil additive), some molycote ptfe-n spray and thicken it with graphite powder (the kind you get in the little squirt bottes) to the consistency required.

first i couldnt believe it, but the epoxy hardens with these ingredients. when it wouldnt harden at shop temperature i put it under a lamp overnight. the molykote spray has some weird solvent in it, so you have to wait until it evaporates before pouring.

as i mentioned, there is no stick slip whatsoever, its just beatifull. however i believe there might be a slight shrinkage of the mixture, but i dont really know. i always make an oversize shaft to make things really tight. so far i have used this for bearings only, so im not sure if it would be a potential problem if used on the carriage or cross slide.

also i have only tried small stuff, so i dont know how cost effective it would be in large quantities.

darryl
04-23-2012, 03:05 PM
I once took a blob of epoxy putty and mixed in some graphite powder. You could draw with it- a little crudely mind you.

One day I'll play with these other additives and see what I get.

Forrest Addy
04-23-2012, 03:44 PM
Not on my machine tool that I expect to get 20 years of working life. I don;t fill my own teeth either.

ckelloug
04-23-2012, 06:30 PM
This came up over and over again on cnczone on the epoxy granite thread.

Here's the last post about it
http://www.cnczone.com/forums/985266-post4543.html

Solvents in epoxy tend to lower the strength and you would get more problems with things like shrinkage if the solvent has to leave.

You can get tungsten disulphide powder from http://www.lowerfriction.com/ to replace molybdenum disulphide.

There also a posting somewhere on a forum about a guy that made material from the original moglice patent.

lazlo
04-23-2012, 06:54 PM
Solvents in epoxy tend to lower the strength and you would get more problems with things like shrinkage if the solvent has to leave.

You can get tungsten disulphide powder from http://www.lowerfriction.com/ to replace molybdenum disulphide.

You can also buy raw molybdenum disulphide powder on Ebay. It's not cheap, but it's way less than Devitt charges for the friggin' hazmat fee for the real deal :)
http://www.ebay.com/itm/150800543831

Also, the original Moglice was Moly-D and graphite in a common 2-part epoxy. The 2nd gen Moglice is PFTE in epoxy. Have no clue if the newer formulation has graphite. Like Forrest says, I'd be a little dubious about using home-brew Moglice on a machine that I really cared about, but for a home brew CNC machine...

lazlo
04-23-2012, 07:54 PM
You can get tungsten disulphide powder from http://www.lowerfriction.com/

That's a neat page Cameron! I had never heard of Tungsten Disulfide:


Tungsten Disulfide (WS2) is dry/solid lubricant powder and is one of the most lubricious substance in world. WS2 offers excellant dry lubricity (COF: 0.03) unmatched to any other substance, including Graphite or Molybdenum Disulfide (MoS2).

Tungsten Disulfide (WS2) can also be used in high temperature and high pressure applications. It offers temperature resistance from -450 deg F (-270 C) to 1200 deg F (650 C) in normal atmosphere and from -305 deg F (-188 C) to 2400 F (1316 C) in Vacuum. Load bearing ability of coated film is extremely high at 300,000 psi.

Tungsten Disulfide (WS2) can also be used instaed of Molybdenum Disulfide (MoS2). See comparison of WS2 / MoS2

Since the powder offers one of the lowest Coefficient of Friction (Dynamic @ 0.03 & Static @ 0.07), the applications are unlimited and could be tried with every conceivable idea. .

Two established ways the WS2 powder can be used are:

1) Mixing the WS2 powder with wet lubricants (such as oil, grease & other synthetic lubricants):
The powder can be mixed 1wt% to 15wt% (as required) with grease or oil. This will enhance lubricity of the mixture and also improves High Temperature and Extreme Pressure properties of mixture. During the use, WS2 in the mixture will get coated on mating/moving parts, which in turn reduces friction and improves lubricity and load bearing ability for much longer cycles.

2) Coating the WS2 powder on a substrate requiring (dry) lubricity:
The powder can be coated by spraying (at 120 psi) the substrate with dry (& cool) pneumatic air. It does not require any binders and spraying can be done at normal room temperature. Coated film will be 0.5 micron thick. In an alternative application method, the powder can also be mixed with Isopropyl alcohol and this paste could be buffed to the substrate.

dian
04-24-2012, 03:01 AM
on second thought, a certain (controlled) amount of friction might be a blessing, if you want to pour a running bearing. i might experiment a little more. heat the mixture while its curing and not afterwards for example.

tungsten disulfide is interesting, but at a specific gravity of 7.4 you dont really get that much of it for 50 bucks.

in brasil they apparently put sand into the mixture?

darryl
04-24-2012, 03:25 AM
A little friction would be better than stiction. I'm sure you could tell a controller to apply a certain minimum level of current to a motor to make it just begin to move a slide, and you should have precise control. Stiction on the other hand is going to make the drive currents fluxuate wildly if the system uses a feedback control. With a stepper you might end up with missed steps.

The thing I wonder about with epoxy is what effect the actual epoxy particles will have when they slowly get abraded away. Will they cause separation of the sliding surfaces such that the slippery components lose some effectiveness? Will they develop into tiny hot spots as the slide moves and thereby act like hot-melt glue?

I guess I'd also worry about the epoxy layer staying in place. Offhand, you'd think that the more slippery components go into it, the less the epoxy would be able to stick to a surface.

Ian B
04-24-2012, 03:36 AM
"An antifriction paste containing epoxy resin, molybdenum disulphide, graphite, aluminum, copper, alumosilicate and polyethylenepolyamine, the components being used in the following proportions (in parts by weight): epoxy resin: 40-80 molybdenum disulphide: 15-30 graphite: 10-15 aluminum: 5-10 copper: 5-10 alumosilicate: 8-15 polyethylenepolyamine: 5-10. The antifriction paste may also contain a solvent for the epoxy resin in an amount from 5 to 30 parts by weight. This paste is suitable for both small-and large-size friction assemblies. On the basis of this paste a solid lubricating coating with high antifriction performance is produced. Thus, a coefficient of sliding friction f.sub.fr. at a sliding speed V=0.06 m/s at a load P=10 kgf/cm.sup.2 is 0.2; linear wear rate I.sub.h under the same conditions is 1.0.10.sup.-9, and service life is as high as 500 km."

So - the idea would be to coat one of the bearing surfaces with this mixture, let it set, and then machine it to shape? The mating bearing face would be metal, as fine a finish as achievable?

Ian

macona
04-24-2012, 04:07 AM
Ill stick with buying it.

T.Hoffman
04-24-2012, 08:50 AM
That's a neat page Cameron! I had never heard of Tungsten Disulfide:


I've been using Tungsten Disulfide (ws2) for years now.
Big believer in it.

I use the .4 micron size in just about everything, I LOVE it in my manual transmission Rangers. I started using ws2 about 4yrs ago.
Just got a 06 Ranger with a stick, first thing I did was redo the trans fluid with ws2.

Also use it in my motorcycle's final drive (shaft drive). Last I looked during maintenance with about 8000 miles on the bike, the machining marks were still on all the gearing.
I could see no evidence of wear from 8k miles.

Snowblowers, outboard engine lower units, mix it in with grease, etc....
Going to start using with engine oil too now.

The price for the ws2 that I have has come down considerably in the last few years.
So has the particle size. When ws2 powder first came out, the particle size was still fairly large. There were issues with using it in a filtration system that it might clog the filter.
With really small particle sizing, it passes through the filter with little problem.

Now they make true nano-particle ws2 powder, but it is still big $$$.
When I bought a pound of it (0.4 micron), it was around $120 or so. Now it is down to $55?

dian
04-29-2012, 03:32 PM
do you see any benefit in the nano stuff (< 1 micron) for a poured bearing? maybe big particles provide better characteristics in this case?

A.K. Boomer
04-29-2012, 04:18 PM
Ill stick with buying it.



"stick with" ? ------------------- good one...:)

jep24601
04-29-2012, 10:41 PM
There used to be an engine oil called "Filtrate" that had graphite in it. I don't think it was compatible with paper type oil filters though. That might be an issue with the earlier posters suggestion about adding the Tungsten Disulphide to engine oil,

flylo
04-30-2012, 01:07 AM
Ah, maybe a use for my tunsten carbide!

dian
05-09-2012, 11:51 AM
intrigued by tungsten disulfide, i got myself some of the stuff. its grade 2.

the black powder didnt seem too slippery to the touch, less so than graphite. i mixed it with epoxy and poured a bearing as well as a flat surface. the bearing didnt work, the mix didnt adhere at all when hardened a was in no way slippery. the flat surface has a pronounced stick slipp, has roughly the friction of polished metal and even will stick to things, like a mirror or granite plate. if you rubb the powder onto a surface, it does not reduce friction.

so is the stuff only good as an additive to oil or is there a trick to make it work?

i also tried to melt it (acetylen) and it woulnd. it turned into a hard crust, as though it had burned.

T.Hoffman
05-09-2012, 12:07 PM
intrigued by tungsten disulfide, i got myself some of the stuff. its grade 2.

so is the stuff only good as an additive to oil or is there a trick to make it work?

I have only used ws2 mixed in with oil, trans fluid, gear lube, and grease.
Outside of that, I have not tried doing anything else with it.

With particles that small, I'm a bit leary of touching the stuff with no rubber/latex gloves on. Who knows what those particles do if they get into your system....

I know when I've spilled a bit on my counter top or bench, it can be tough to get off as it seems to embed itself in the surface.

The guy on my motorcyle forum who got me onto tungsten disulfide has been using it for a long time in everything including any and all of his engines.
He's got 60,000 miles on his motorcycle and still commuting everyday with it, been using ws2 in the engine and final drive from the get go.
No slippage from the clutch with the ws2 added either.

He recently mentioned he bought a kg of the true nano-powder tungsten disulfide for $800... (yikes), he believes in it that much.
He figures that should treat 250 quarts of oil, which equates to an added $3.20 per quart.

ckelloug
05-09-2012, 12:34 PM
Hi Dian,

I hope i was clear that I haven't actually tried the Tungsten Disulphide yet. Your results show it's tricky to use in a bearing material even though it's probably what I would want to start with.

The first observation I would make is that each particle is going to be covered with epoxy and the performance will likely be completely terrible until the material wears in a bit. You are most likely measuring the friction properties of the epoxy rather than the WS2.

I would assume you have to wear the epoxy off to the point where the Tungsten Disulphide particles are actually exposed. My suggestion for experimentation purposes
would be to rub your surface with sandpaper and wash it thoroughly and try again. If the surface is large, an objective test would be to place an object on the surface and see what angle is required to make the object slide.

The original website I saw suggested lapping the powder into a metal surface or blasting it on in a spray. I got the impression that the WS2 particles being exposed on the surface was a key to success and that will take wear-in or abrasion in the types of systems we see in machine tools.

I am not a shill for Tungesten Disulphide, if it doesn't work, it doesn't work however the published friction numbers for it are good enough that I expect that there at least exists a condition where it does work.

dian
05-09-2012, 02:08 PM
good idea to sand it. just did it. 600 gritt paper. first it started to get slippery. then i washed it off. was dull as before. so i think the powder reduces friction somewhat, but not nearly as much as graphite. also the fact, that it doesnt adher to metal probably means, there is not much epoxy on the surface. it also increased the viscosity of the epoxy quite a bit, so for my puposes ill forget about it.

but what to do with the 100 grams i have? i will try making a tea.

btw, i also tried to mix it with soldering paste but it just foated on top.

gnm109
05-09-2012, 02:42 PM
Not on my machine tool that I expect to get 20 years of working life. I don;t fill my own teeth either.


:D.........................

ckelloug
05-09-2012, 02:56 PM
Hi again Dian,

From what I've read, WS2 is pretty chemically inert. Heated with an oxyacetylene torch, it most likely decomposes into pure tungsten powder and sulphur oxides: SO2 SO3 etc.

These guys suggest two application methods http://www.lowerfriction.com/product-page.php?categoryID=1

The kind they specify for lubricating is a 0.6 micron powder. I get the feeling that this stuff kind of works like a bunch of little ball bearings so the size may matter. I am curious if you can post a link to the WS2 that you got since I'd like to compare the specs to the ones I know of.

Sorry it didn't work out.

duckman
05-09-2012, 03:08 PM
I still can't see how its cheaper on eprey there price is $10 per ounce almost $150 per pound Canadian price is $55 per pound

dian
05-09-2012, 03:45 PM
fortunately my powder was free.

http://www.alroko.de/show_products.php?prod_id=73

im afraid theres not much info on their pages. grade 2 is 0.8 - 1.1 mu.

im really courious, why the most slippery stuff in the world is not slippery for me. but as it is not an ingredient of moglice or turcite, i am not alone.

i have just done a pour of epoxy with graphite, stp and very little tds, no good, doesnt flow and looks brittle after a short time.

will be rubbing the stuff into various materials (lubriflon?) to definitely check it out.

Low-alloy
05-10-2012, 04:20 AM
I use the .4 micron size in just about everything........
When I bought a pound of it (0.4 micron), it was around $120 or so. Now it is down to $55?

Hello, T.Hoffman;

Can you tell us where you buy .4 micron Tungsten Disulfide? LowerFriction.com has .6 micron but not the .4. Don't know if .2 microns is much of a difference in lubrication apps, but I think in this case smaller is better.

T.Hoffman
05-10-2012, 09:03 AM
Hello, T.Hoffman;

Can you tell us where you buy .4 micron Tungsten Disulfide? LowerFriction.com has .6 micron but not the .4. Don't know if .2 microns is much of a difference in lubrication apps, but I think in this case smaller is better.

Actually I did buy mine form LowerFriction.com, that was about 4-5yrs ago when they the .4 mircon was the newest (and smallest) stuff they had.
Now they have smaller powder, so they may have changed their sizing availability somewhat.

On their NanoProducts page, they do have 90nm ws2 powder for sale in small amounts, but pricey.

I wouldn't hesitate to email them with questions on their "contact" page. In the past they have been very helpful with information.
I think they may have more things available than what is listed on their website.
I don't see some options on their site that I know people have recently purchased from them.

Thruthefence
05-10-2012, 09:08 AM
Has anyone tried teflon powder in these home brew concoctions?

dian
03-28-2014, 02:31 PM
tungsten disulfide revisited:

so, i was making two hinges, basically a ground rod firmly pressed into a steel block and another steel block rinding on it with a slight interferrence fit. for some reason i got one of the holes wrong, it was to tight, there was strong ratcheting action when moving it. i started reaching for my honing equipement to open up the hole, when i remembere tds. i mixed some of the stuf with alcohol and applied it to the hole. then i pressed in the pin: it rotated very smothly! so i guess the benefit of tds shows up, when a big load/pressure is in play.

i then poured an other bearing with just epoxy and tds. (previously i was adding it to the mixture.) it didnt flow well and it shrunk a bit. so i used a polished 8 mm drill bit shank (7.95 mm) to pour the bearing. after it hardened, i pressed in a h7 pin (7.99 mm) and while it couldnt be rotated by hand, it had no stick slip. even a m6 pin (8.01 mm) didnt have any stick slip, needed some force on a wrench to rotate.

so tds seems to have some merrit. why the mixture shrinks, however, is beyond me. neither epoxy nor the metal should shrink.

Glug
03-28-2014, 05:00 PM
Thanks for the report and bumping the thread.

Searching on the topic of epoxy shrinkage suggests this is a common problem.

I wonder if there any major health risks with such small particles? I read the MSDS but it was pretty general.

Doc Nickel
03-28-2014, 11:21 PM
Curious this thread comes up. I have a cheap import X/Y table I've been wanting to improve- both to be able to actually use the damn thing, and also as scraping/fitting/alignment practice before I tackle a more serious project.

I was thinking about trying some Moglice as well, as one or two of the 'real' projects will probably need it. The problem is, the hazardous materials surcharge more than doubles the cost of the epoxy itself. I'm willing to pay that when the time comes for a serious build, but not just for screwing around with.

So given the above DIY methods, what would you gents think of something like JB Weld as the epoxy, using one of the aforementioned powdered fillers? (Moly-D, tungsten, PTFE, graphite, even bronze.)


I wonder if there any major health risks with such small particles? I read the MSDS but it was pretty general.

-Generally speaking, virtually any dust can be harmful, not necessarily for the chemical/toxicity effects, but also for the simple clogging aspect. Some particles, the body can break down and absorb, others, it can't. A notable example is stainless steel. In those cases, the particle is encysted- but too much of that, and lung capacity is reduced. The encystions are basically scar tissue.

So even if the stuff is more or less chemically inert, it's still strongly recommended one uses a respirator with a suitable filter- note a painter's dustmask won't really protect against a 'nanoscale' particle.

Doc.

atty
03-29-2014, 03:13 AM
Not on my machine tool that I expect to get 20 years of working life. I don;t fill my own teeth either.

No fair, Forrest. If you still have teeth to fill, you don't qualify for this discussion.

Glug
03-29-2014, 06:23 AM
So given the above DIY methods, what would you gents think of something like JB Weld as the epoxy, using one of the aforementioned powdered fillers? (Moly-D, tungsten, PTFE, graphite, even bronze.)


I think JB weld has fillers, possibly metallic. Hobby shops often carry different viscosities of epoxies in actual bottles at fairly reasonable prices. Some for laminating, some for finishing, some for casting, etc. They often have longer working times. The big hobby places like hobby lobby may also be an option.

There are various self leveling products intended for covering floors. They probably wear well and might have a lot of the characteristics for an application as a bearing. I'd be cautious about possible fillers, and ultimate hardness.

The West epoxies are available at marine supply places. Those tend to be high quality with advertised physical properties. A bit spendy.

I wonder if degassing the epoxy under a vacuum before pouring would help with any of the dimensional stability issues?

Doc Nickel
03-29-2014, 08:33 AM
Actually, I mentioned it because it's fairly easy to get around here. Due to the hazmat costs, most any volume of epoxies over the hardware store tubes or syringes is pretty expensive up here.

Plus, I was thinking about trying to mix up a putty- something with enough body that it won't "slump" appreciably.
Doc.

dian
03-29-2014, 10:11 AM
"Searching on the topic of epoxy shrinkage suggests this is a common problem."

for sikadur-30 (an epoxy based glue), for example, shrinkage is specified at 0.04%. my other concoctions didnt shrink, on the contrary, the shaft was hard to remove. you want a little shrinkage, i guess.

as for jb weld, i dont think it would work, you want some thin epoxy, so you can mix in a lot of graphite powder and still pour it into the gap. i would mix in a small amount of moly grease or stp, that will make it realy slippery.

how would you use the "putty"? apply it to the ways and set the carriage (or whatever) on top? and then try to press it out? might even work, but it still has to flow well to come out.

a good question was asked about teflon powder. does anybody know where to get that?

kendall
03-29-2014, 12:27 PM
Last time I was at Ace hardware, I noticed teflon powder in the oil/lube section, Was getting some gear lube, so didn't look at it and don't know amount, particle size, price or anything else. Was right next to graphite lock lube.

Doc Nickel
03-29-2014, 02:59 PM
how would you use the "putty"? apply it to the ways and set the carriage (or whatever) on top? and then try to press it out? might even work, but it still has to flow well to come out.

-Actually, that is a technique. Over on PM, a fellow is/was rebuilding a Hendey lathe, and had the bed professionally ground. He then set up some "levelling jacks" that went on the corners of the carriage in place of the way wipers, and both raised the worn carriage back up to it's original level, and aligned it to be perfectly square to the bed.

He then smeared a very thick Moglice putty on the carriage ways, flipped it over and set it down on the bedways to harden. (Naturally he prepped the bed with a mold release, used tape to mask off the unneeded areas, prepped the carriage by sandblasting the ways to rough them, he degreased everything, etc.) He was even able to cast the oil grooves in by putting thin pinstripe type tape in a zigzag on the bed first.


a good question was asked about teflon powder. does anybody know where to get that?

-There was some on eBay under "PTFE powder".

Doc.

CarlByrns
03-29-2014, 05:05 PM
I've been using Tungsten Disulfide (ws2) for years now.
Big believer in it.

I use the .4 micron size in just about everything, I LOVE it in my manual transmission Rangers. I started using ws2 about 4yrs ago.
Just got a 06 Ranger with a stick, first thing I did was redo the trans fluid with ws2.

Also use it in my motorcycle's final drive (shaft drive). Last I looked during maintenance with about 8000 miles on the bike, the machining marks were still on all the gearing.
I could see no evidence of wear from 8k miles.

Snowblowers, outboard engine lower units, mix it in with grease, etc....
Going to start using with engine oil too now.

The price for the ws2 that I have has come down considerably in the last few years.
So has the particle size. When ws2 powder first came out, the particle size was still fairly large. There were issues with using it in a filtration system that it might clog the filter.
With really small particle sizing, it passes through the filter with little problem.

Now they make true nano-particle ws2 powder, but it is still big $$$.
When I bought a pound of it (0.4 micron), it was around $120 or so. Now it is down to $55?




At work we routinely use our trucks, trailers, and even SUVs to their max load weight and get no less than 250,000 miles out of them. The bigger trucks go well past 400K and we never have premature lubrication failures with any vehicles ( a blown turbo at 300,000 miles is hardly an early failure). Everything is lubed by the book, sometimes a little less.

All of our vehicles rust out before they wear out.

So I gotta ask: what is the benefit of ws2?

Nitrous
04-23-2014, 09:34 PM
At work we routinely use our trucks, trailers, and even SUVs to their max load weight and get no less than 250,000 miles out of them. The bigger trucks go well past 400K and we never have premature lubrication failures with any vehicles ( a blown turbo at 300,000 miles is hardly an early failure). Everything is lubed by the book, sometimes a little less.

All of our vehicles rust out before they wear out.

So I gotta ask: what is the benefit of ws2?

I've been reading about the properties of Moglice and hunted down some academic papers that look at Hexagonal Boron Nitride as a filler in epoxy resin use. Excellent lubricity and the highest (of the agents we're discussing) in thermal conductivity.

All of these are available, in nano particle sizes for less than $100. The larger .5micron size seems to used quite a bit in DIY bullet reloading.

In quite interested in casting a zero backlash lead screw nut.

Nitrous

dian
04-24-2014, 03:03 AM
i have boron nitride in the 1-2 u size. what do the papers say a bout it? i have not used it yet.

btw, ws2 is black bn is white.

Nitrous
04-24-2014, 06:34 PM
i have boron nitride in the 1-2 u size. what do the papers say a bout it? i have not used it yet.

btw, ws2 is black bn is white.

Particle size is usually sub 1 micron. There is some reasonably price 70nm stuff (ie in the nano particle size).

You're correct about the color. That's why boron nitride is also known as "white graphite". ;)

Nitrous

GKman
04-25-2014, 07:45 AM
Caution - Additives in transmission
I once used Slick 50 manual transmission additive in my Toyota Pickup.
Whatever transmission they put behind a 22R engine.
Must have made the synchronizers to slippery or something.
Long time ago but seemed the symptom was that dogs would not engage and I would have to clutch and re-try getting in gear. This would happen maybe one time in ten. After a lube change and about 50,000 miles it started working right again.

I've been reluctant to use snake oil since and have been able to tolerate the consequences.
Your mileage may vary.

Doozer
04-25-2014, 09:07 AM
Yes be careful with super slippery stuff.
May be good for bearings and gears, but not for clutches.
Synchronizers are wet clutches. Same goes for motorcycles
with wet clutches (almost all of them). Slick snot will make
them slip.

-Doozer

Nitrous
04-25-2014, 09:24 PM
Glad I'm not thinking of putting this stuff anywhere but into epoxy resin ;)

plunger
06-21-2019, 02:08 AM
Has this thread died a natural death because moglice cant be homemade or is there anyone out there who achieved acceptable results. I could see this application would be perfect for a leadscrew nut or making a super slick spin indexer for a tool and cutter grinder.

jmarkwolf
06-21-2019, 07:59 AM
Uh... what's moglice?

rkepler
06-21-2019, 11:57 AM
Moglice is a pour able way compound used in machine tool rebuilding, similar in use to Multifil or Turcite. Essentially it's an epoxy that contains modifiers to make it slick. I used it to rebuild a Monarch lathe cross slide - placing it under the saddle against a freshly ground bed (with a liberal application of release compound).

When you're rebuilding something that's going to be worth $10K when it'd done right and $500 in scrap if done wrong I just buy the Moglice from Devitt. I don't recall it being more than $100 even for the big ass ways I was applying it to and can't see that I could work up a good replacement for the $100. But that's just me.

reggie_obe
06-21-2019, 12:18 PM
Moglice is a pour able way compound used in machine tool rebuilding, similar in use to Multifil or Turcite. Essentially it's an epoxy that contains modifiers to make it slick. I used it to rebuild a Monarch lathe cross slide - placing it under the saddle against a freshly ground bed (with a liberal application of release compound).

When you're rebuilding something that's going to be worth $10K when it'd done right and $500 in scrap if done wrong I just buy the Moglice from Devitt. I don't recall it being more than $100 even for the big ass ways I was applying it to and can't see that I could work up a good replacement for the $100. But that's just me.

+1 to the above.

plunger
06-21-2019, 12:53 PM
+1 to the above.

This may all be fine if you live in the States.It may also be fine in a country with a working post office.I ask this question because I would think that if one were to
try and make for example a spin indexer that is real slick.

What would happen if you took a ground 25mm shaft and clocked it up in a block with a hole of say 40mm. If you could have two holes in the block 180 degrees apart and attach one end to a vacuum pump and the other end to a reservoir filled with epoxy that is impregnated with graphite powder and the epoxy is sucked through to encapsulate the shaft.

Would that not be a simple way to make a very good fitting bearing surface. It would be better than a hacker trying to machine and lap a bush and shaft.?
What would a good source of graphite be?Would there be a better source of lubricant.?

I could see this working very well for a crosslide nut like the Evannut? Maybe I could call it the EMANnut?:cool:
The epoxy I want to mix the graphite into is called pratleymould
Check it out. Its about halfway down the page.
http://www.pratleyadhesives.com/industrial-adhesives?Page=2&Items=12