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Black_Moons
05-25-2012, 08:25 PM
Hi, Today I picked up a new bandsaw blade. 1' by 6' by 1/8"... Yes, 1' wide! Ok, So its not exactly new, And its not really an entire blade either. About 0.3 TPI. Seems to be from some huge wood mill :)

So long story short, a friend wants to make carving knifes out of the body of this. And wants to encourage me to try the same. I brought my sawsall over and a metal cutting blade (I would say bimetal but... it was a dang cheap blade) and cut it... Well, 3/4" of it, then my blade stoped cutting. Cut pertty good at the beginning but its a cheap sawsall and was going too fast. So scrap that idea.

Failing that, he droped it off at my house. So now I have more methods to attack. My current plan is to use a zipcut blade to cut it into 5"x12" blanks, then use my bandsaw to cut that into 5" x 1" blanks or so, most likey on the lowest blade speed setting (60~80sfm I think?), 10~13tpi varitooth blade. thinking of trying to stack 2+ 5"x12"x1/8" blanks at once. If I move my vise to the other side of the bandsaw, I can cut off up to 3" wide at (near) unlimited length.

So, Will my bandsaw blade cut this bandsaw blade? :) SAW VS SAW.

I tried cutting it with a file, it cut really nicely. Teeth appear welded onto the large bandsaw blade.

I also have a portband but I can't cut straight with that thing to save my life and it does not have 5" throat depth.

So, tools are: O/A torch, Jigsaw, sawsall, 3" cutoff grinder, angle grinder:4 1/2", 5", 7"... portband, 5x6 swivel bandsaw with hydraulic downfeed.. 14" cutoff saw.. Air shears, air nibbler, lathe, mill.

Whats going to be my best way of choping this huge blade up into hundreds of tiny blades? Apparently the guy has about 100' more blade where this came from.

Also, Is this actualy good steel to be making a high quality wood carving knife out of? He seems to have been told its great, athough im not too sure by who exactly.

Seems to me that some air/water cooled tool steel would be much better.. but then I have no idea what this stuff is and I don't have the skill to warrent spending $$$ on steel when I can chop it off for the cost of consumables to chop it up, so this will do for now untill I can grind a good enough knife to know better.

Most likey I will be attempting to heat treat them, so anneling them before cutting is not out of the question, just costly with only O/A.

wierdscience
05-25-2012, 08:43 PM
Use a grinder and a zip blade to chop it in lengths,place said lengths in a piece of steel pipe along with some wood or paper and seal the ends up tight.Place said pipe in a good hot fire and cook the thing for several hours so to anneal the blades inside.The wood/paper inside uses up the remaining oxygen in the pipe so the steel doesn't scale.

You should at this point have steel soft enough to cut with a metal cutting band saw blade.Shape the blades the way you want,rough grind the bevel ,drill some rivet holes for the handle, go find a magnet a bucket of burnt motor oil,some gloves,goggles,tongs,torch and fire extinguisher and write down the number for 911.

Carefully heat the blades to dull red along the cutting edge only checking with the magnet as you go.When the edge loses magnetic attraction pick the blade up with the tongs and quench it in the oil vertically.Clean the blade up,stick it in the cook stove at 400*f for an hour or so and your almost done.Finish grind the edges,rivet on the handles and hone.:)

Or just go find a friend with a Plasma cutter:)

Or forget the whole thing and buy some thin O-1 flat stock instead:D

Optics Curmudgeon
05-25-2012, 08:44 PM
Find a friend with a plasma cutter, bring some beer, and the job won't take long. Don't worry about a big heat affected zone, either, the grinding involved in shaping the blade will do worse.

lynnl
05-25-2012, 09:03 PM
I tried making a wood marking knife from a piece of metal cutting band saw blade. It too was about 1" wide, maybe a little more.

After grinding off the teeth and grinding a bevel edge on it (on the end), the first time I tried using it on some hardwood the edge just rolled over after two or three cuts.

I didn't anneal that. Just scored it with a file and snapped the short pieces off.

I did use a few pieces for scrapers though. They worked pretty good for that, but still didn't seem especially hard.

Black_Moons
05-25-2012, 09:05 PM
Find a friend with a plasma cutter, bring some beer, and the job won't take long. Don't worry about a big heat affected zone, either, the grinding involved in shaping the blade will do worse.

Don't mind the HAZ since I will nodoubt need to harden, but would still need to grind back any kerf if it changes the metal chemicaly at all like the slag on O/A cutting.


Problem with using a fire to annel it before bandsaw cutting it, is I would like to have 5" x 12" chunks, so I would need one VERY big pipe! More like a BBQ or something...

alanganes
05-25-2012, 09:12 PM
I tried making a wood marking knife from a piece of metal cutting band saw blade. It too was about 1" wide, maybe a little more.



Note that the OP said his blade was 1' (as in FOOT) wide, probably from a sawmill. Whole different animal, I'd guess.

Gazz
05-25-2012, 09:14 PM
If the teeth look like they are welded on, they are probably high speed steel (or maybe even carbide) and the rest of the blade is probably something like 1040, a poor steel to make a knife with. A buddy of mine gave me a bunch of both kinds, high speed teeth and carbide teeth. A little research revealed the rest of the blade was 1040.
A common steel to make bandsaw blades out of is 15n20 (without welded on teeth) which will make a fair knife but you may have a hard time finding a piece big enough to make reasonable size knife. If you want to cut it, you can use a a hand held angle grinder with a disc or even a Dremel type tool with a cut off disc.

Black_Moons
05-25-2012, 11:40 PM
Hmm, Well im not totaly sure if the teeth are welded on or forged/heat treated.

Theres a rust line 1" from the teeth on the blade. looks like some heat treating occured, and as far as I can tell the teeth and the blade are the same material, athough the teeth tips are much wider then the blade.

Also, the shavings nearly set my belt sander on fire, if thats any help in ID'ing the alloy.

Tait
05-26-2012, 07:42 AM
I have a knife made out of a bandsaw. It's sort-of OK, but not great.

There are a couple of threads over on bladeforums that may be of some help:


Bandsaw blades for knives. (http://www.bladeforums.com/forums/showthread.php/559757-Bandsaw-blades-for-knives?highlight=bandsaw+blade)

Are bandsaw blades 15n20? (http://www.bladeforums.com/forums/showthread.php/540116-Are-bandsaw-blades-15n20?highlight=bandsaw+blade)

lynnl
05-26-2012, 08:30 AM
Note that the OP said his blade was 1' (as in FOOT) wide, probably from a sawmill. Whole different animal, I'd guess.

Ooops! Thanks, you're right I did miss that.

I once lived near a big hardwood flooring and lumber mill. Right off to the side of the road was a large open sided sawyer shed. Driving by, you could see that big band; it extended from below floor or ground level, up into the attic. I never got an up-close look, but it appeared to be about a foot wide, with about 2" between teeth.

Black_Moons
05-27-2012, 01:07 AM
Hmmm, I wonder how much it costs to actualy ID metals properly?

Gazz
05-27-2012, 10:45 AM
Why not try carefully grinding an edge in your piece of blade (like at the end) and seeing how it holds up to usage? You will have to be careful not to overheat and draw out any hardness though - wet grinding would be best. Make a chisel and cut some stuff and see how it performs. If it works good on wood and other soft materials, then try cutting a nail to see how much, if any, the edge deforms. This will at least tell you if it will make a decent blade but certainly not the alloy.

Black_Moons
05-27-2012, 08:04 PM
Why not try carefully grinding an edge in your piece of blade (like at the end) and seeing how it holds up to usage? You will have to be careful not to overheat and draw out any hardness though - wet grinding would be best. Make a chisel and cut some stuff and see how it performs. If it works good on wood and other soft materials, then try cutting a nail to see how much, if any, the edge deforms. This will at least tell you if it will make a decent blade but certainly not the alloy.

Yea, thats kinda my thought.

Im gonna make a knife, harden it (water hardening!), give it to my friend who is a wood carver, tell him to use it as a roughing knife and if the edge chips before it dulls, and does not dull faster then his regular knifes, then I know I have something.

Gazz
05-27-2012, 08:50 PM
I would not use water to harden it since you do not know what alloy you are dealing with. Stick with warm vegetable oil. Actually I wouldn't even bother with any heat treating at all since the saw blade should be right about where you want it for a knife.

Northernsinger
05-27-2012, 10:35 PM
I've been around 'em quite a bit. Plenty of stories. Here's a photograph I snapped once:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v227/brnstn/06-12.jpg

These are somewhere around forty feet long. Plenty of blades if you work at it.