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jhe.1973
05-26-2012, 02:12 AM
Hi Everyone,

It’s been awhile since I’ve had the time to get back here & I just solved a nasty problem so I thought I’d share what I came up with as a quick & dirty solution.

2 of the spark plugs on my V6 Pathfinder are buried under the intake requiring a long reach hard plastic tube w/glued on boot at each end:

http://i1096.photobucket.com/albums/g327/jhe-1973/Spark%20plug%20cutter/1.jpg

They are supposed to just pull off but the lower boot on one plug was seized at the bottom. Even w/pliers & a 2 foot pry bar it wouldn’t budge and this is what happened to the top end:

http://i1096.photobucket.com/albums/g327/jhe-1973/Spark%20plug%20cutter/2.jpg

I REALLY didn’t want to pull off the intake w/related vacuum & coolant hoses etc. soooooo, being ever the lazy cheapskate that I am, I scrounged around the shop & found a piece of 1 inch dia. steel w/a ¾ shank that I turned into this cutter:

http://i1096.photobucket.com/albums/g327/jhe-1973/Spark%20plug%20cutter/3.jpg

Using a ¼ inch endmill and an index fixture bolted on 2 different slots I cut the teeth as shown:

http://i1096.photobucket.com/albums/g327/jhe-1973/Spark%20plug%20cutter/4.jpg

Continued next post.....................................

jhe.1973
05-26-2012, 02:14 AM
Just a close up:

http://i1096.photobucket.com/albums/g327/jhe-1973/Spark%20plug%20cutter/5.jpg

Nothing fancy, I didn’t even measure angles, just used whatever I got from the table slots.

Then I found a piece if ¾ thinwall EMT and crimped one end until I had a press fit for the cutter.

I pressed the tubing onto the cutter in my screw press that bears a striking resemblance to my lathe:

http://i1096.photobucket.com/albums/g327/jhe-1973/Spark%20plug%20cutter/6.jpg

After crimping the first end it gave me the idea of crimping the other end until I could use a socket for driving the assembly:

http://i1096.photobucket.com/albums/g327/jhe-1973/Spark%20plug%20cutter/7.jpg

Finished cutter:

http://i1096.photobucket.com/albums/g327/jhe-1973/Spark%20plug%20cutter/8.jpg

Continued next post............................................

jhe.1973
05-26-2012, 02:17 AM
By putting downward pressure on a ratchet w/one hand and cranking w/the other I machined the bottom end until the I felt a crack & up came the remains of the plastic tube.

http://i1096.photobucket.com/albums/g327/jhe-1973/Spark%20plug%20cutter/9.jpg

I still had to get what was left of the stuck boot so I used a 12 inch X 1/8 drill bit and kept working around by hand, alternating with blasts of air to clean out rubber pieces.

http://i1096.photobucket.com/albums/g327/jhe-1973/Spark%20plug%20cutter/10.jpg

Finally, after about 3 hours, I got it all and could remove the spark plug. Here is the remains of the boot next to a good one. You can see how much was ‘machined’ out by the cutter before it finally broke loose. I was almost all the way through!

http://i1096.photobucket.com/albums/g327/jhe-1973/Spark%20plug%20cutter/11.jpg

From now on, I’m pulling the plug wires at every oil change and lubricating these boots.

I also need to get back here more often. Reading some of the threads I have missed reminded me of how I enjoy the banter & sense of humor that often goes around.

Thanks guys!

Frank46
05-26-2012, 03:08 AM
You had almost as much fun as I did when I attempted to replace the top piece of a hayward DE filter element. Works best when you do it upside down. Lotta choice words regarding the idiots who designed it and didn't put anything about instructions in the paperwork. Frank

A.K. Boomer
05-26-2012, 09:43 AM
Very crafty JHE, you fix things in allot of the same fashion as I do, It doesn't need to be perfect, it doesn't need to look pretty, it just needs to get the job done,
You shot from the hip - used stuff that was just laying around and readily available and used all of your resources and tooling in a very unique manner...

this is improvising at it's best - and it's getting the greatest bang for the buck out of everything you own.

Your cutter tool you built looks like a downsize scale model (minus the length) of a tool I built to save a dodge colt vista trans that wore its throwout bearing pilot mount so terribly (bad pressure plate) the tranny was going to have to be scrapped due to the mount being integral to the trans case,
This is before I had a machine but I did have a round file and that along with a flat one is what I used to cut the teeth, turned in a new smaller diameter mount and had a sleeve that fit over it and was the perfect O.D.


Good job and thanks for triggering the thought of another "ghetto repair" of my own...

This is what this site is all about - and using your tooling in a way it was not designed for --- it's a beautiful thing.

Edit; I just remembered how I drove my cutter, I pounded a 12 point socket on the end of the cutters tube, the thing is - is I had already built the cutter side and had it sharp and everything - (Duh) so I just placed that end on a 2by4 and it did not bother the teeth...

vpt
05-26-2012, 09:58 AM
Nice job! At first I thought you needed advise and I was going to mention just drill the whole deal out of the hole. The "hole saw" looks like it worked wonders!

Use lots of dielectric grease.

sasquatch
05-26-2012, 10:10 AM
I get very annoyed at people that put things together dry.

See it all the time.

Only takes a minute to give it a suitable lube.

dian
05-26-2012, 12:33 PM
that 12" drill is amazing. i didnt know they existed. where can you get them?

jhe.1973
05-26-2012, 12:39 PM
that 12" drill is amazing. i didnt know they existed. where can you get them?

Had it for years, but I'm pretty sure it came from ACE hardware. It's HSS too!

On edit: Just noticed you are in Switzerland. If you can't find one there easily, let me know & I can buy one here and send it to you. It came blister packed to a cardboard back so packing it would be a snap.

jhe.1973
05-26-2012, 01:01 PM
Very crafty JHE, you fix things in allot of the same fashion as I do, It doesn't need to be perfect, it doesn't need to look pretty, it just needs to get the job done,
You shot from the hip - used stuff that was just laying around and readily available and used all of your resources and tooling in a very unique manner...

this is improvising at it's best - and it's getting the greatest bang for the buck out of everything you own.

And for beating the engineers at their own game. If you check out my first post from last year you'll see I can do pretty & precise as well as quick & dirty. I'm not locked into either style.

Your cutter tool you built looks like a downsize scale model (minus the length) of a tool I built to save a dodge colt vista trans that wore its throwout bearing pilot mount so terribly (bad pressure plate) the tranny was going to have to be scrapped due to the mount being integral to the trans case,
This is before I had a machine but I did have a round file and that along with a flat one is what I used to cut the teeth, turned in a new smaller diameter mount and had a sleeve that fit over it and was the perfect O.D.


Good job and thanks for triggering the thought of another "ghetto repair" of my own...

This is what this site is all about - and using your tooling in a way it was not designed for --- it's a beautiful thing. Plus this site is about each of us leaning on each other when we need help or can give it. One of the best uses for computers I've ever found. Like last year when I had to move a 4400 lb. shaper & didn't have an accurate weight beforehand. You guys were a godsend!

Edit; I just remembered how I drove my cutter, I pounded a 12 point socket on the end of the cutters tube, the thing is - is I had already built the cutter side and had it sharp and everything - (Duh) so I just placed that end on a 2by4 and it did not bother the teeth...

Thanks A.K for your kind words. You do sound like we are on the same wave length. (Duh) It strikes me funny that I didn't think to use a block of wood & arbor press to protect the teeth when assembling this cutter. Just too much of a hurry I suppose.

Here is the page w/my first post if you have the time:

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/showthread.php?t=39202&page=120

MotorradMike
05-26-2012, 06:37 PM
Clever red squirrel.
I bet you make a fine neighbour!

Mike Folks
05-27-2012, 01:24 AM
6" and 12" aircraft drill bits come in numbered, lettered, and fractional sizes. I have a selection of 6" #30's for a tighter fit on 1/8" rivets.

www.browntool.com and other aircraft tool suppliers can get you about any you'll need.

JRouche
05-27-2012, 01:49 AM
Jim. I love it. The time you took to snap some great pics and the entire detailed write up. But more importantly the skill you have to find a solution with what you had in your garage.

I wish I could fill my street full of like minded folks like you here. It would be a street of ingenious folks having fun. Although you might be at the top of the heap if you dont mind. I like yer methods but would have taken the easy (read lazy) route and used the side angled grinder to make the cuts on the bit. But thats only cause Im lazy. The better route is to cut the flutes like you did.

Can you move? Weather is nice here. Id love to have you around to help out with my every day projects. A fresh mind is ALWAYS welcome here. Thanks for the post. Good info. JR

A.K. Boomer
05-27-2012, 09:42 AM
In case you guys didn't get to go check out his link it's well worth it. here's a pic of the depth finders he built, very very nice stuff.


http://i1096.photobucket.com/albums/g327/jhe-1973/Depth%20tool/DSC_0592.jpg




More photo's here; http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/showthread.php?t=39202&page=120

If Jules Verne used depth gauges to build his submarine they would have looked allot like these...

jhe.1973
05-27-2012, 02:19 PM
Jim. I love it. The time you took to snap some great pics and the entire detailed write up. But more importantly the skill you have to find a solution with what you had in your garage.

I wish I could fill my street full of like minded folks like you here. It would be a street of ingenious folks having fun. Although you might be at the top of the heap if you dont mind. I like yer methods but would have taken the easy (read lazy) route and used the side angled grinder to make the cuts on the bit. But thats only cause Im lazy. The better route is to cut the flutes like you did.

Can you move? Weather is nice here. Id love to have you around to help out with my every day projects. A fresh mind is ALWAYS welcome here. Thanks for the post. Good info. JR

Thank you JR for the kind words & invitation!

Can't move, but I will be in Pasadena for a few days in about 3 weeks. Any chance we could get together? It would be an honor! ;)

jhe.1973
05-27-2012, 02:31 PM
In case you guys didn't get to go check out his link it's well worth it. here's a pic of the depth finders he built, very very nice stuff.

More photo's here; http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/showthread.php?t=39202&page=120

If Jules Verne used depth gauges to build his submarine they would have looked allot like these...

A.K., Thank you also for your kind words.

When I learned this Tool & Die craft from my Dad many years ago he used to say, "You shouldn't have to brag, your workmanship should speak for itself". I guess I have taken that more to heart than I realized when he said it. That's why I always feel a bit uncomfortable when I have to blow my own horn. Yet I know that I have to stand up for myself at times to be noticed.

Any chance you would consider a job as a P.R. person? :D

I do have to mention something about the depth tools.

The smaller one on the right is not one I made. It was commercially available years ago for watch work. I only included it for a size comparison & to show the traditional spring & adjustment system that was typical back then.

P.S. Here are a couple of views of how I used this tool last year to make a new steel pinion to replace one that had broken a tooth:

http://i1096.photobucket.com/albums/g327/jhe-1973/Junghans/New%20pinion/19.jpg

http://i1096.photobucket.com/albums/g327/jhe-1973/Junghans/New%20pinion/19A.jpg

Here is the finished pinion assembled to the wheel, next to the broken one:

http://i1096.photobucket.com/albums/g327/jhe-1973/Junghans/New%20pinion/42a.jpg

Gee, I guess I am highjacking my own thread!

A.K. Boomer
05-27-2012, 03:01 PM
Thanks for including a pic as now I and many of us who didn't know can see how the tool is used, that is very useful and well done.

Highjack your own thread all you want, this place is all about showing the things you built and how to use them and everything connected, It's not bragging and even if there's a little of that in there you deserve to toot your own horn a little about your accomplishments - I hope others will join in and bring their little gems to light so everyone can learn and marvel at the craftsmanship ---- you have far more patients than I and I have allot of respect for that.

Your "copy" replacement pinon gear and shaft look better than the original.

jhe.1973
05-27-2012, 03:33 PM
Thanks for including a pic as now I and many of us who didn't know can see how the tool is used, that is very useful and well done.

Highjack your own thread all you want, this place is all about showing the things you built and how to use them and everything connected, It's not bragging and even if there's a little of that in there you deserve to toot your own horn a little about your accomplishments - I hope others will join in and bring their little gems to light so everyone can learn and marvel at the craftsmanship ---- you have far more patients than I and I have allot of respect for that.

Your "copy" replacement pinon gear and shaft look better than the original.

See what I mean A.K.? Now about that job offer..........................:D

I really like the sayings in your signature. At one place I worked we had the 'Beatings Will continue...' up on the wall and the Delay/Denial reminds me of what I always tell people:

I've always wanted to get a job as a procrastinator but I keep putting off going out to find one so I guess I'll never realize my life's dream.

I just had to add that to my signature!

A.K. Boomer
05-27-2012, 04:59 PM
Glad you like the sig posts, the first four I got off of fortune cookies, the fifth I made up myself and the Sixth I seen on a friends T-shirt. :)