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derekg
06-01-2012, 09:34 PM
O' Lord, forgive my evil ways (and gibs, and cross slide, and...)

3" aluminum round was too large for the steady rest. A 4x4, some screwed on stir sticks, and a lot of grease got it within .040. Good enough to face, center drill, and turn to OD.

https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-8FDfnXwOxt4/T8ldmapXI8I/AAAAAAAAABk/WRjYBDyjvtk/s1072/P1010289.JPG

Duffy
06-01-2012, 09:44 PM
I guess I am a bit thick. It works, so what is "hillbilly" about that? It looks like a great one-off solution!:D

flylo
06-01-2012, 10:22 PM
I'd patent it! You'll beat everyone on price & with enough paint stick one size fit all. What more would you want except maybe "as seen on TV". In that case show it sitting on top of your TV in the ad.

J.Ramsey
06-01-2012, 10:25 PM
Why not tap the work piece true while turning the chuck by hand, then center drill at slow speed then turn/face?

A.K. Boomer
06-01-2012, 11:37 PM
I guess I am a bit thick. It works, so what is "hillbilly" about that? It looks like a great one-off solution!:D




Oh it's hillbilly alright --- the splintered up shims, the big one looking like it's actually been used to level out concrete or something before - make no mistake - that set-ups got hillbilly written all over it,
Not to mention the the fact that his facing cut's were loading 180 degree's off the "reinforcement's" (hillbilly boards),
This last little known fact is the very reason it qualifies as being hillbilly,,, It even states in the hillbilly dictionary and I quote;

"All hillbilly apparatuses worthy of the name hillbilly must include at least a 10% chance of failure that also includes a 10% chance of the 10% chance (1% minimum) of risking either Life or Limb..."

And although while not directly stated - I believe getting clobbered in the face with a big chunk of aluminum qualifies...




and just because something actually works does not make it non-hillbilly - how do you think hillbillies got here in the first place - and they occupy every corner of the globe...


Well done by the way Derek, your disregard for your precision equipment is the icing on the cake ;)

Carld
06-02-2012, 12:03 AM
I've not done it that way but I have stuck a 2x4 down between the ways and while the metal turned in the slowest speed I used the 2x4 to gently force the work to a centered condition. It does work in a pinch to get it centered to drill with a center drill quick and dirty.

I have also used a piece of brass in a QC tool holder and pushed against the side of the shaft to align it. That's safer and what I do more than the 2x4 trick.

darryl
06-02-2012, 01:07 AM
Waddya mean, hillbilly- that's on page 479 of 'How to run a lathe' :)

becksmachine
06-02-2012, 02:20 AM
Waddya mean, hillbilly- that's on page 479 of 'How to run a lathe' :)

Ha-ha, that is good. :D

It's only got 478 pages.

Dave

Jaakko Fagerlund
06-02-2012, 03:36 AM
Why not tap the work piece true while turning the chuck by hand, then center drill at slow speed then turn/face?
Probably because the length and weight doesn't go well with the chucks holding power, meaning it would probably drop easily. And the chuck jaws might not be getting full contact if the other end is also not straight (sawn surface).

Nice solution, I've used similar once with a long pipe that needed a facing cut, but the wood I used had a V-groove made in to it with a chainsaw :D

cameron
06-02-2012, 11:38 AM
Would putting the tool in upside down and cutting on the back half have put you below the required hillbilly risk factor?

A.K. Boomer
06-02-2012, 11:52 AM
Would putting the tool in upside down and cutting on the back half have put you below the required hillbilly risk factor?




I was thinking his safest bet would be to flip the tool like you said but leave it on the same side and run the lathe in reverse...

Still might qualify as hillbilly though depending on whether or not he has a piston type or wedge type quick change tool post...

get's pretty technical - I was a hillbilly judge back in the day - pretty much takes one to know one...

as you can imagine - bonus points in this configuration if he's got a thread on chuck...

jep24601
06-02-2012, 12:57 PM
Ha-ha, that is good. :D

It's only got 478 pages.

Dave

YOU LOOKED!!

justanengineer
06-02-2012, 02:32 PM
My only concern would be if the wood comes loose and hits you. Then you would only need blame the booze for it to be redneck.

Seriously tho, there is nothing wrong with using wood as a bearing surface, there are actually methods/formulas for using it as such in the older Machinery's Handbooks.

rws
06-02-2012, 06:11 PM
I have used a piece of furring strip as a follow rest when turning down the end of small diameter rod. Not exactly precise, but it got the job done.

Clevelander
06-03-2012, 08:42 PM
Seeing a picture in the dictionary under "ugly" that looked just like this. :D

The Artful Bodger
06-03-2012, 09:24 PM
My only concern would be if the wood comes loose and hits you. Then you would only need blame the booze for it to be redneck.

Seriously tho, there is nothing wrong with using wood as a bearing surface, there are actually methods/formulas for using it as such in the older Machinery's Handbooks.


None at all...

http://www.lathes.co.uk/drummond/img1.jpg
from http://www.lathes.co.uk/drummond/

See that 'F' shaped device lying on the face place in the chip pan? Thats the supplied steady in which one fits a block of wood drilled for the size of the workpiece. I have one and it works a treat! So great I might even make one for my Chinese lathe..