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Anvils
06-03-2012, 07:26 PM
I have a friend that has an old Maletti tiller that needs replacement blades for. This tiller hasn't been made for some time and the correct blade isn't available. ( We have tried everyone selling replacement blades withoput any luck)
The needed blades would be easy to make but I am unsure of what steel to use. The old blades are some type of carbon steel but don't seem to be too hard.
I am thinking something like 4140 PH or ?? Got any ideas?

Thanks, Norm

kf2qd
06-03-2012, 08:29 PM
Mangenese. Not that hard to work, but wears well.

radkins
06-03-2012, 08:40 PM
Mangenese. Not that hard to work, but wears well.



I would think Manganese would be quite difficult to make something like tiller blades, even if it could be found in thin strips. If you heat Manganese to try to bend it like is normally done with carbon steel it breaks like hot cast iron and even cold bending leaves it very weak in the bend. Besides wouldn't it be far to brittle for something thin like a tiller blade? Some type of high carbon steel that can be hardened after forming by heating and quenching would seem to be what is needed.

sasquatch
06-03-2012, 08:43 PM
What about old leaf springs?

Shuswap Pat
06-03-2012, 09:25 PM
You want an Abrasion Resistant plate - typicaly we use AR, QT100, or QT360 for similar applications. Depending on where you are located your local steel supplier should be able to fix you up. You can get the parts waterjet, plasma, or laser cut to size, so there is no secondary machining - other than forming and/or sharpening. The above steels are tough, but machiniable with carbide tooling (and high speed steel - causiously).

Patrick

J. R. Williams
06-03-2012, 09:31 PM
A previously mentioned use old automobile leaf springs or if you are in a rural location, try your county road maintenance shop and obtain a few used road grader blades.

JRW

Willy
06-03-2012, 10:12 PM
Like J.R. Williams and Sasquatch mentioned, automobile leaf springs would be my first choice for readily accessible material. While maybe not a perfect choice, it would sure as heck get the job done for this not so high-tech application.
The abrasion resistant steels would of course be a first choice. Think of a source of material wherever steel comes into constant contact with dirt. I've used grader blade cutting edges, cultivator, and harrow pieces and even good old 1045-1065 steel.

For Maletti blades have you tried these guys?

Maletti tiller blades (http://www.tiller-blades.com/index.php?keyword=Maletti+&Search=Search&Itemid=1&option=com_virtuemart&page=shop.browse)

tdmidget
06-03-2012, 10:12 PM
You want an Abrasion Resistant plate - typicaly we use AR, QT100, or QT360 for similar applications. Depending on where you are located your local steel supplier should be able to fix you up. You can get the parts waterjet, plasma, or laser cut to size, so there is no secondary machining - other than forming and/or sharpening. The above steels are tough, but machiniable with carbide tooling (and high speed steel - causiously).

Patrick

+1. Forget all this crap about springs and grader blades- these people have never done this. Those would have to be annealed to bend them . The springs are not abrasion resistant and the T1 leading edges for the moldboards are at least 1/2 inch thick.

sasquatch
06-03-2012, 10:17 PM
i,ll still stick with the leaf springs.:p :rolleyes:

elf
06-03-2012, 10:23 PM
Would hard facing work for the blades: http://www.amazon.com/1-8-Hard-Facing-Electrode/dp/B000RGN1TY

Willy
06-03-2012, 10:31 PM
i,ll still stick with the leaf springs.:p :rolleyes:

Ditto!
It goes without saying that all of the materials discussed would have to be annealed and re-hardened after shaping.
I've done about a half a dozen sets and all are still in service. It's not an overly complicated process plus the materials are easy to source.
I do have one set that is starting to get thin but for the number of years it's been in service it sure doesn't owe me anything.;)

Anvils
06-03-2012, 11:43 PM
Thanks for the replies!
I agree that Manganese would be an ideal material but by the time I found and purchased the matereial I would have way more into this than old Joe would want to pay!

Willy, I did check with that outfit for tiller blades when we started this job. Unfortunatly Maletti used two different style blades on this tiller and the ones we have are no longer made. We were able to find half a set at the local farm supply of the correct style so I am now down to making only a few.

Shuswap, I will try to find the steels you suggested in Portland.

If all else fails, I will try the old springs and hardfacing if needed.

Norm

Willy
06-03-2012, 11:59 PM
Yes not a rocket science project. It does not have to be a 'mil-speci-billet' material.

Here's a few links just to show you how often the 1045-1080 series of steels are used in this type of abrasive application.

http://www.monroetufline.com/products/gb-graderblades.htm

http://www.galaxyagrico.com/cultivator1.html

http://qualityfarmsupply.com/t/categories/tillage-slash-cultivator/spike-harrows/harrow-teeth/for-clamp-attachment

http://qualityfarmsupply.com/t/categories/tillage-slash-cultivator/plow-parts/conventional-plow-parts/plow-shares

There may be a more perfect choice of material....but hey you aren't in the business of setting the world on fire with a new line of Ultimate tiller blades....keep it simple.;)

tdmidget
06-04-2012, 12:10 AM
AR400 can be drilled, bent, (though it looks like you have some acute bends which might require some heat, not red hot) and welded. Your supplier can probably point you toward some customers with experience if you have questions and they might make them cheaper than your time is worth. Why fool around with junk?

Arcane
06-04-2012, 02:38 AM
Would modifying the mount on the tiller itself to take a readily available blade (something close to what's presently on it that would work with the news ones you found) be out of the question?

studentjim
06-04-2012, 07:19 PM
At the last fab shop where I worked we used 400f steel which is abrasion resistant but can be formed, sheared and punched. I have made many blades for tillers ,rakes and loader bucket cutting edges out of this material and after a year there was minimal wear on the material,very tough stuff.

macona
06-04-2012, 08:14 PM
I would just modify either the discs where the tines mount or the tines themselves. I have done it before on another tiller that's tine were worn to a point. Not that hard to do. Easies is to make up some new square plates and cut off the old ones. Then you will always be able to get spares.

high country
06-04-2012, 09:14 PM
I have made tons of them in my day working at the spring shop. We used 4140 and drilled or punched the holes, hardfaced some of them then hot forged them into shape and drew them back. Nobody complained. A lot of guys are saying leaf steel won't work.....its the same as every shank you see on ever fertilizer applicator made. If they can pull it through the ground for 5 years without issue, it ought last twenty lifetimes on a tiller.