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kNucKlbustr
06-03-2012, 09:56 PM
The problem Im having is these chips fly everywhere. What a mess to clean.
Mostly toward head and behind me about 3ft. A cover over the headstock would be useless because the lengths can run up 35".
Im using a drip coolant system. The selector on the gear is 755 rpm. And feed rate about .0044, I think. The first pass I take about .080" off, then slow feed to .0039 and run off .030.
I thought about flipping the tool upside down and running reverse, but the coolant wont get to it. These are hot steamy chips.
Using TRIM E206, 1:4, which is another prob. Nasty stuff.
Also using TCMT 21.51-CM Carbide Insert


Any ideas?

Bryce.R
06-03-2012, 10:26 PM
make a perspex gaurd with a hinge that attaches to your toolpost

lakeside53
06-03-2012, 10:38 PM
Welding (or whatever) curtains that are on an overhead rail - like a shower curtain. Pull it around the entire machine or just into the chip path. Big sheets of cardboard or ply work well also.

I wear a face sheild and welding leathers if it's real hot and on me. A simple piece of plexi -say 12 inches square and magnetic base can keep the chips from the operator.

11 Bravo
06-03-2012, 11:53 PM
I am with Bryce. Why not make a chip guard that follows your saddle just like the coolant nozzle does?

You wouldn't even have to make it. If you are willing to spend the money they are available already made.

A.K. Boomer
06-04-2012, 01:24 AM
I still remember some of my worst hot chip episodes - it's really like they are burned into my memory.

corner of the eye ------ probably the worst and most painful

in between the toes --- pleasantly uncomfortable

down the front of the shirt and to rest on the belly --- not as much fun as you would think - highly overrated.

Carld
06-04-2012, 01:36 AM
I took an old magnet dial indicator base and a large square piece of plexiglass and mounted it on one of the rods of the base. I put that on the carriage or crossfeed or somewhere and adjust it so it stops the chips and deflects them back into the bed of the lathe. The plexiglass panel follows the cutter and the chips.

Sometimes I just hold the plexiglass in my hand to deflect them.

Boucher
06-10-2012, 12:52 AM
I recently made some table guards for the mill using HDPE. Today cutting some slots in pipe and the blue chips that were being created are now stuck in the surface. They didnít blow off or vacuum loose but I didnít have time to mess with them today. They have worked great with aluminum. But the HDPE may have been a bad choice.

kNucKlbustr
06-10-2012, 01:13 AM
Using what was readily available, made a curved removable plexiglass shield.
about 6-8" wide and curving over to center line its mounted w/ (2) 1/4" cap screws, on the left side, front of crosslide. The shield has 2 slots at bottom to easily remove from untighten bolts. Dont need it for facing, boring, grooving.

Funny thing, after spending 25 mins making this and mounting it to turn down a 30"L piece, all the chips went straight down from the carbide insert. None went up or out. Must be the way I positioned the tool bit. But at least Im not getting wet.

Forrest Addy
06-10-2012, 01:49 AM
I use a boat trailer fender. Couple pieces of angle; couple C-clamps: badda-bing!

oldtiffie
06-10-2012, 03:09 AM
The problem Im having is these chips fly everywhere. What a mess to clean.
Mostly toward head and behind me about 3ft. A cover over the headstock would be useless because the lengths can run up 35".
Im using a drip coolant system. The selector on the gear is 755 rpm. And feed rate about .0044, I think. The first pass I take about .080" off, then slow feed to .0039 and run off .030.
I thought about flipping the tool upside down and running reverse, but the coolant wont get to it. These are hot steamy chips.
Using TRIM E206, 1:4, which is another prob. Nasty stuff.
Also using TCMT 21.51-CM Carbide Insert


Any ideas?

Its not certain that the coolant will get to the cutting adge with the tool as normal either. The coolant might just be landing on the cutter and chips and not at the cutting edge/point at all. It might not work with the tool inverted and the lathe reversed either but the chips will be deflected down into the tray.

It might work - or might not - but give it a try anyway and see which suits you best.

PixMan
06-10-2012, 08:20 AM
Shut the coolant off and let the carbide insert do it's job. Control the chips using mechanical means.

And why are you running that soluble oil coolant at twice the highest recommended concentration? It's designed to work best at no more than 10%, you are at 20% or higher. That may well be why it is "nasty".

Make special note, if you didn't already know, of using the "O-I-L" mantra for mixing. Always put the little bit of coolant into the larger volume of water, or "Oil-In-Last". Pick up a $79 refractometer someday so you can check where the coolant really is. Perhaps you might take the time to review this data sheet, and get the coolant working better for you:

http://www.masterchemical.com/db-docs/pdf_di/E206.pdf

Unlike sex or booze, in this case more is not better. ;)