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View Full Version : My latest find. . .Buffalo Forge Co post drill press



atomicjoe23
06-09-2012, 09:44 PM
I just picked this up today. . .complete and functioning!

http://i416.photobucket.com/albums/pp247/atomicjoe23/DSC00842.jpg


http://i416.photobucket.com/albums/pp247/atomicjoe23/DSC00841.jpg


http://i416.photobucket.com/albums/pp247/atomicjoe23/DSC00840.jpg


http://i416.photobucket.com/albums/pp247/atomicjoe23/DSC00839.jpg

atomicjoe23
06-09-2012, 09:45 PM
Last two pic's until I get a place to mount it. . .

http://i416.photobucket.com/albums/pp247/atomicjoe23/DSC00838.jpg


http://i416.photobucket.com/albums/pp247/atomicjoe23/DSC00837.jpg

flylo
06-09-2012, 09:51 PM
Nice find! I love those old things & had one until someone talked me out of it.:(

sasquatch
06-09-2012, 10:39 PM
Nice find Atomic Joe!! Those old post drills are very collectible!!

What's the "Scoop" on that Jeep? pickup in the pic that is partly showing??

lane
06-09-2012, 11:11 PM
Yep had one same brand and all .Hung on the wall of my shop for years until I gave it away. And it will drill a hole ,but will wear your arm out cranking the thing. Nice to look at but I don`t want to have to use one

KIMFAB
06-09-2012, 11:39 PM
I'm still mad at my idiot uncle because of this.
My grandfather had an identical unit and when he died my uncle took all his tools and peddled them off for a song and pocketed the money before anyone could do anything.
When I was a kid I used to spend hours cranking it and listening to it chunk down each step.

I did manage to find and repurchase his vise and anvil tho.

justanengineer
06-09-2012, 11:46 PM
My father currently has a dozen or more old post drills, and I think one of them is also a Buffalo Forge. He bought them ~15 years ago when they still commonly sold for <$10. Now that folks are spending significantly more (not sure why myself), he has sold most of what he had.

I say paint it up and hang it high on a wall.

Don Young
06-09-2012, 11:53 PM
My dad powered one with a small electric motor and used it in his auto repair shop for many years. I do still have it.

J Tiers
06-10-2012, 12:28 AM
Dang those things all look almost the same....

I have one on a post out in the shed, and most all of it except the advance mechanism looks virtually the same. I'm pretty sure mine isn't a Buffalo, but I for get what it really is.

oldtiffie
06-10-2012, 03:31 AM
Those things used to be in just about every Farmer's shed here and were gradually sold off or scrapped.

Thay are a OHS night-mare as you need two hands - one on the down-feed and the other to rotate the spindle and too many "bite/nip" spots ready and all too willing to grab the careless or unwary.

I hope that any who fancy them are not expecting too much of the chuck and spindle run-out.

I realise that many them - but I would neither let one on a post here or in the shop or even the property.

oil mac
06-10-2012, 08:25 AM
I wonder just how many of these drilling machines were produced over the years, Buffallo forge must have been a big plant One of my pals picked up one of these for himself over here in Scotland three weeks ago , would seem they were factored out to dealers to sell all over the world.

sasquatch
06-10-2012, 09:38 AM
There was a Canadian division also, "Canadian Blower and Forge".

Still lots of that equipment around, but you have to search for it.

bruto
06-10-2012, 09:50 AM
Those things used to be in just about every Farmer's shed here and were gradually sold off or scrapped.

Thay are a OHS night-mare as you need two hands - one on the down-feed and the other to rotate the spindle and too many "bite/nip" spots ready and all too willing to grab the careless or unwary.

I hope that any who fancy them are not expecting too much of the chuck and spindle run-out.

I realise that many them - but I would neither let one on a post here or in the shop or even the property.Not quite so. This has an automatic downfeed. You might need a second hand to hold the part if you have no vise or hold-down, but otherwise it's a one-hand job to run it. Very kind to bits as well. I used one for years, and it rarely damaged a bit. The one pictured is odd in that it has an extended shaft on the flywheel, suggesting that someone once put a pulley on it for power. Some later Buffalo models had a grooved flywheel for this purpose.

My main drill for a long time was a big old Buffalo of odd configuration, which I've never seen another of. Can't keep the number in my brain, but it had a split nut on the feed screw, and a lever for lowering the feed, making it very fast to use as a self-feeding press, and if you had a hold-down or vise, it could be used as a sensitive press.

J Tiers
06-10-2012, 11:23 AM
Those things used to be in just about every Farmer's shed here and were gradually sold off or scrapped.

Thay are a OHS night-mare as you need two hands - one on the down-feed and the other to rotate the spindle and too many "bite/nip" spots ready and all too willing to grab the careless or unwary.

I hope that any who fancy them are not expecting too much of the chuck and spindle run-out.

I realise that many them - but I would neither let one on a post here or in the shop or even the property.

A nice, open-minded post......

1) as noted, it has auto downfeed.... ALL of them that I know of have that feature, and it is adjustable, depending on the stroke of the feed lever. The lever normally covers anything from one to 3 or 4 notches per crank rev, translating to that proportion of a turn on the feed collar, and a resulting feed per turn.

2) you seem to be comparing them to jig borers..... but they are drill presses... and they need NO electric service, which can be a big plus if the electricity goes out as often as it does in the US. Drill presses are not for jig borer precision, as you have yourself pointed out.

3) as for "letting one on the property", I strongly doubt that it would contaminate your shop.....
They are handy to have, and are a step between the "drill ratchet and old man" and the regular electric drillpress. A "drill ratchet and old man", or the equivalent, is also handy for turning large bits in work that can't be brought to the drillpress when your portable drill can't handle the job.

bruto
06-10-2012, 07:14 PM
Say what you may,. Old Tiffie, but I used this drill press as seen here (not as mounted) for many years, and it drilled good holes, reasonably fast, with less effort and less strain than you'd expect. It is a very well designed tool. As you might see also, this one is quite unusual in having that split nut on top, and a lever allowing it to be used as a sensitive press, or simply to allow very fast return and resetting. It also allows gearing down for very heavy work. I bought it long long ago missing a couple of parts including the ratchet wheel, which I hurriedly made out of an old Fiat timing gear, meaning to do better some later time, but never bothering. It's a bit poorly filed, but goes fine. You may not want such a beast in your shop, but I would not be in any hurry to turn mine away, even though I rarely use it nowadays except for display.

http://img217.imageshack.us/img217/8854/drillpress2.jpg

sasquatch
06-10-2012, 08:13 PM
WOW, i just did a google search of Buffalo forge company, started i think back in 1878 they sure made a lot of different products over the years!!

It certainly was a BIG company!!

J Tiers
06-10-2012, 11:48 PM
Turns out mine is not a Buffalo, but a Champion Blower and Forge unit.... almost identical except for details, including the down-feed arm.

I've drilled holes with it that nothing else I had out where it is would drill. The Buffalo unit is in every way at least as good.

You can swing the table aside, and prop up big stuff under it. Handy, needs no food, water, or electric power, what's not to like?

Oh, and if you ever wondered WHY there is such a thing as "Silver and Deming" drills, these post drills are the original reason....


BTW..... mine was FREE....... off the junk pile, but in perfect condition other than a missing lower bracket for the table post.

bruto
06-10-2012, 11:55 PM
I started googling again for mine, without getting very far, but I did find one image that explains atomicjoe's extended shaft on the flywheel. It appears that some models were made with a flat belt pulley outboard of the flywheel. My guess is that this is one of those, missing that pulley. The last generation or so, of which I have one also in storage, used a v-belt pulley for a flywheel, and ran very nicely with a quarter-horse dryer motor as power. These things needed very little power to go well.

oldtiffie
06-11-2012, 01:07 AM
A good portable hand drill with its own drill stand is a very good portable unit - ie use it where you need it.

My father-in-law had a post drill like the ones posted and its fair to say that if nothing else it hurried up both buying a good electric drill and press drill as well as sending the post drill to scrap.

Attitude of F-I-L and myself was that as he got the post drill for nothing that it was well over-priced.

I can understand people wanting and perhaps using one as a "heritage" or "period piece" but anything that resembled anything in those categories was tossed out here a long time ago and they damn sure aren't coming back.

sasquatch
06-11-2012, 09:00 AM
You seem to condem everything that you think may be no good.

Did it ever occur to you that the drill you had laying around was a cheaply made offshore one?:D

J Tiers
06-11-2012, 09:16 AM
A good portable hand drill with its own drill stand is a very good portable unit - ie use it where you need it.

My father-in-law had a post drill like the ones posted and its fair to say that if nothing else it hurried up both buying a good electric drill and press drill as well as sending the post drill to scrap.

Attitude of F-I-L and myself was that as he got the post drill for nothing that it was well over-priced.

I can understand people wanting and perhaps using one as a "heritage" or "period piece" but anything that resembled anything in those categories was tossed out here a long time ago and they damn sure aren't coming back.

BIN IT!

Tiffies war cry..... for everything which doesn't meet his particular set of standards.

Well, to each their own. The post drill is a practical drill, never runs out of battery power, and does a rather good job, overall.

is it BETTER than an electric drill press? No.

Is it totally useless and suitable only for display at some sort of "what the barbarians used" display? Clearly not.

Your portable drill isn't much use when the electricity is out, or someplace where electric power isn't available for whatever reason. Nor is it very much fun to use with a large drill..... you get quite a "ride", with your wrists getting a beating if you don't have a long pole handle to take the torque.

On the other hand, the post drill, as I know from personal experience, will happily drill large holes, although it is slower than a big drill press. Even then, it is faster than a drill ratchet and old man. Never an issue of no electric power, dead batteries, etc, etc, etc.

oil mac
06-11-2012, 01:16 PM
BIN IT!

Tiffies war cry..... for everything which doesn't meet his particular set of standards.

Well, to each their own. The post drill is a practical drill, never runs out of battery power, and does a rather good job, overall.

is it BETTER than an electric drill press? No.

Is it totally useless and suitable only for display at some sort of "what the barbarians used" display? Clearly not.

Your portable drill isn't much use when the electricity is out, or someplace where electric power isn't available for whatever reason. Nor is it very much fun to use with a large drill..... you get quite a "ride", with your wrists getting a beating if you don't have a long pole handle to take the torque.

On the other hand, the post drill, as I know from personal experience, will happily drill large holes, although it is slower than a big drill press. Even then, it is faster than a drill ratchet and old man. Never an issue of no electric power, dead batteries, etc, etc, etc.


J. Tiers,

I very much, concur with your sentiments, O.K. horses for courses, If one is doing anything like production work, then the electrically powered machine is the way we all go, Saying just that, exceptions prove the rule, I have an old bench pattern hand operated drilling machine, This machine i find very handy for drilling very hard material , because of the extremely low speed
Now for an even more amazing example of low tech application, I have a pal in Glasgow, whom i went to see a couple of months back, He was loading his Tiawanese built drill press into the rear of his motor car, En-route for "The Clenny" for non Glasgow folks, that is the slang term for the municipal rubbish collection point, A most apt place for its final resting place As regards quality this machine was Diabolical

Now what does our man use ? Got it in one dear readers ! Yes an old hand powered bench drilling machine, One of the tasks he uses it for, Believe it or not, When rebushing clock plates, he drills & counter forms the oil sinks, using this machine, An example of a low tech simple machine working on work of the finest calibre & his workmanship is of the best. The reason being he can feed the oil sink forming tool gently into the bush without biting

AzironaZack
06-11-2012, 09:14 PM
I have an electrified post drill that I use as my only drill press. My most recent use was to make one or two 3/4" holes in 80 steel plates 3/16" thick. I made a jig to clamp 8 plates at a time and then just turned the machine on and walked away. Every few minutes I'd check on it to add a drop of oil and clear chips but otherwise the machine did all the work. Every 20 minutes or so I'd swap out the stack of plates.

I'm certainly not building tight tolerance stuff on this machine but it's been a life saver for mass-production type work. My arm would have been worn out trying to drill all those holes on an import conventional drill press.

At some point I'd love to have a big modern drilling machine with power feed but until then my big geriatric drilling machine with power feed is doing the job just fine.

AzironaZack
06-11-2012, 09:18 PM
One more thing: I love the sound my drill (electrified) makes. The gentle clinking of the feed foot and the sliding of the feed arm over the eccentric are music to my ears.

oldtiffie
06-11-2012, 09:37 PM
You seem to condem everything that you think may be no good.

Did it ever occur to you that the drill you had laying around was a cheaply made offshore one?:D

I don't think so - all of my portable drills are German (surprise heh?).

The drill I have "lying around" is this one which will do most jobs if I'm patient.

http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/aa294/oldtiffie/Med_Speed_Spindles/Metabo_drill1.jpg

http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/aa294/oldtiffie/Med_Speed_Spindles/Metabo_drill2.jpg

http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/aa294/oldtiffie/Med_Speed_Spindles/Metabo_drill3.jpg

No need for mains power - or battery drills either if the power is off:

http://powerequipment.honda.com.au/Super_Quiet/EU20i

Works fine in the shop and if I need it away from power outlets I just put it in a barrow or on the front of the mower and away I go.

So, as badly off as we are, we persevere and manage to cope somehow.

And:


You seem to condem everything that you think may be no good.

I don't.

I only say that its no good to me - not and never that its no good to anyone else - as thats their business. What others have and what they do with their stuff is solely their business and certainly not mine.

My having an opinion is not necessarily the same as me saying that if someone else has something I don't like its no good or use to anyone else.

oldtiffie
06-11-2012, 09:40 PM
BIN IT!

Tiffies war cry..... for everything which doesn't meet his particular set of standards.

Well, to each their own. The post drill is a practical drill, never runs out of battery power, and does a rather good job, overall.

is it BETTER than an electric drill press? No.

Is it totally useless and suitable only for display at some sort of "what the barbarians used" display? Clearly not.

Your portable drill isn't much use when the electricity is out, or someplace where electric power isn't available for whatever reason. Nor is it very much fun to use with a large drill..... you get quite a "ride", with your wrists getting a beating if you don't have a long pole handle to take the torque.

On the other hand, the post drill, as I know from personal experience, will happily drill large holes, although it is slower than a big drill press. Even then, it is faster than a drill ratchet and old man. Never an issue of no electric power, dead batteries, etc, etc, etc.

JT.

see my previous reply at:
http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/showpost.php?p=776238&postcount=25