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mrs
10-28-2001, 01:54 PM
I'm wondering how to become a journeyman machinist if you're a talented machinist with a trade school certificate.
How important is this title in getting a good machining job?
Thanks!

BrianH
10-28-2001, 05:54 PM
It really only matters if you want to work for a company that requires a journeyman card. You get that by entering into an appreticeship program with a company that offers it. Most programs are around 8000 hours (correct me, Journeymen!). Many union shops want journeyman certificates.

The reality, I think, is that most shops hire on years of experience and actual experience (the type of work you've done).
If your talented, people will know immediately....and they'll pay you for it, if you have experience that is work something to them. But don't go into shops saying "I can do it all"....I knew someone who did that; took him 2 days to get fired.

Good luck.

SGW
10-29-2001, 09:00 AM
In the "old days," when a machinist pretty much made all his own tools, the contents of his toolbox told employers how good he was.

I wonder if a modified form of that would still be relevant today. If you've made something really nicely, I expect it wouldn't hurt to show it off at a job interview.
For instance, take a look at http://www.jerry-howell.com/Miser.html . If you can build one of those so it runs on the palm of your hand, you're no slouch as a machinist.

Thrud
10-29-2001, 11:18 PM
Gents,

Handiwork samples are excellent to show for sure. Sincere desire and a humble attitude help as well. Be a sponge of knowledge - soak it all up if you can - there are always people that will know more than you, don't forget that. Go to some shops and ask if there is a chance of apprenticing - you will never know if you do not ask...

I wish you a good hunt...
Dave

One more thing, your certificate means much or nothing, depends if your boss is easily impressed (I never am) by paper. Strive to do the best possible job - most people are satisfied with "Good Enough" - don't be a mindless sheep following the herd - strive for excellence. Always

[This message has been edited by Thrud (edited 10-29-2001).]

halfnut
10-30-2001, 11:21 AM
Get in the door, anyhow you can, and start getting some experience. If you have what it takes I expect it will be noticed.

I have worked with card carrying journeymen union machinists. Some were good indeed, some were worth as much as the paper their journeyman card was printed on.

Your tech schooling should get you in the door. Once you have some experience you might find a better job. Journeyman, that's why they have handles on toolboxes I was once told.

Once was the time when manual machinists could take their box anywhere and get a job, worked with one feller who said if the shop down the street paid a nickle more an hour he journeyed down the street. Said it took a while to make the circle of shops in Kansas City. The boss expected people to move around and learn something new down the street, and he expected him back someday.

Things aren't quite like that today. Small job shops are still out there. I kinda like working for a larger company anymore, like my 401 K and senority.

Good luck, and listen to that old fart in the corner, he might be able to teach you something.

Dave Burnett
10-30-2001, 08:40 PM
To get my Journeymans card I had to apprentice in a shop for 10000 hrs. and complete 680 hours of school at the Jr. College at nite for 4 years. I am a Mold Maker. The big thing to remember is when you are working in a shop everything you make is being sold to somebody so you have to be fast and GOOD.halfnut is right,work in a big shop where the benefits and pay are good.

NAIT
03-01-2004, 05:11 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by halfnut:
Get in the door, anyhow you can, and start getting some experience...Your tech schooling should get you in the door.</font>

Would a "trade school certificate" count toward the hours or school requirments of a Machininist apprenticeship, or would the schooling have to be repeated ?

bspooh
03-01-2004, 05:25 PM
[QUOTE]Originally posted by NAIT:
[B] Would a "trade school certificate" count toward the hours or school requirments of a Machininist apprenticeship, or would the schooling have to be repeated ?

Its up to the "employer"..You can get as much credit as your employer wants to give..

brent

metal mite
03-01-2004, 05:41 PM
If that title is important to you, you're gonna have to put 8000 hours plus your book work into it.

If it's not important, there are good machining jobs out there in specilties to be had.

The papers may get you in the door, but they bring certain expectations with the employer and won't keep that job for you.

mite

RD51
03-01-2004, 08:51 PM
Go on some journeys! http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif Sorry I couldn't resist.

NAIT
03-01-2004, 09:00 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">[QUOTE]
[B] Would a "trade school certificate" count toward the hours or school requirments of a Machininist apprenticeship, or would the schooling have to be repeated ?

Its up to the "employer"..You can get as much credit as your employer wants to give..
</font>

I thought it was up to the state/province how much they would allow.

NAIT
03-01-2004, 09:10 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by mrs:
I'm wondering how to become a journeyman machinist </font>


Is it "journeyperson" yet ?

bspooh
03-01-2004, 11:05 PM
NAIT:

I don't know how it is in other states/provinces..but here in Utah, its up to the employer...

brent