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View Full Version : The two collars test in a lathe factory....... Hendy factory tour



J Tiers
06-17-2012, 01:15 PM
Shown about halfway down this page of interesting photos..........

http://www.lathes.co.uk/hendeyfactory/page4.html

The whole Hendy factory tour photoset (1943)

http://www.lathes.co.uk/hendeyfactory/index.html

MichaelP
06-17-2012, 01:53 PM
Very interesting set of photos. Thank you.

mickeyf
06-17-2012, 02:03 PM
Ah, back in the day....

I note the almost complete absence of protective clothing for the foundry workers. (One guy has goggles.)

Fasttrack
06-17-2012, 02:11 PM
Love it! Thanks for sharing. Is that a new addition to the Lathes.co.uk site? Don't recall seeing it before.

lazlo
06-17-2012, 03:10 PM
Neat pictures!

I don't envy the guy whose job it was to mike the bore diameters of the spindle bearings! :)

Notice not a pair of safety glasses in sight...

Arthur.Marks
06-17-2012, 03:11 PM
Yeah. At the top of the main manufacturers' page for Tony's site, there is a "new additions" list. I look there from time to time to see what has been updated. The Hendy tour is only a few days? Old.

Jaakko Fagerlund
06-17-2012, 04:43 PM
Yes, there is the two collars method (or actually three judging from the photo) and just below it is a test bar method shown.

TGTool
06-17-2012, 05:22 PM
The last picture on the page shows a hob being relieved and I'm curious what the process was. There's no mechanism to advance and retract the tool that I can see. They mention a very low speed so do you suppose they just do tooth by tooth going around the thing? That sound high stress in terms of the start/stop and pretty tedious.

Bob Fisher
06-17-2012, 06:43 PM
We had a guy at GM back in the 70's, always wore a shirt, tie, apron,and a bowler hat in the winter and a straw hat in the summer. He was a genuine character, his name was Jim Gladstone. He was a metal model maker by classification ,and a real character.The GM division was Fisher Body. Bob.

.RC.
06-17-2012, 07:44 PM
Shown about halfway down this page of interesting photos..........



Bit of a fatal flaw in your argument... It says spindle alignment as the photo caption, not bed twisting test...

They are using that test to prove the lathe turns parallel within the specs, after it has been set up correctly... It is probably the final test they do before shipping it out the door...

RussZHC
06-17-2012, 08:43 PM
Great photos, thanks for the link :D

I like on Page # 5, "The Incentive and Rate Setting Department"


On page # 2, 3rd photo down, they show the manufacturing of a lead screw, what is the direction of travel?
Interesting system of rests given the relative size of the screw v. overall length

J Tiers
06-17-2012, 09:19 PM
Bit of a fatal flaw in your argument... It says spindle alignment as the photo caption, not bed twisting test...

They are using that test to prove the lathe turns parallel within the specs, after it has been set up correctly... It is probably the final test they do before shipping it out the door...

You bet it is spindle/headstock alignment (the bar is spindle/taper alignment).

It isn't FOR twist...... levels are for twist.:D

Robin R
06-17-2012, 09:40 PM
The last picture on the page shows a hob being relieved and I'm curious what the process was. There's no mechanism to advance and retract the tool that I can see. They mention a very low speed so do you suppose they just do tooth by tooth going around the thing? That sound high stress in terms of the start/stop and pretty tedious.

There is a picture about two thirds of the way down page 2 that shows another shot of a lathe with relieving gear, you can see a shaft that runs along the front of the lathe and into a relieving topslide. There is a cam in the topslide that moves the slide in and out in time with the gashes in the hob, via a change gearbox at the other end of the shaft. http://www.lathes.co.uk/hendeyfactory/page2.html

kitno455
06-17-2012, 09:43 PM
Yeah. At the top of the main manufacturers' page for Tony's site, there is a "new additions" list. I look there from time to time to see what has been updated. The Hendy tour is only a few days? Old.

No, the tour has been there at least a year. I wonder what Tony updated?

allan

becksmachine
06-17-2012, 11:31 PM
The last picture on the page shows a hob being relieved and I'm curious what the process was. There's no mechanism to advance and retract the tool that I can see. They mention a very low speed so do you suppose they just do tooth by tooth going around the thing? That sound high stress in terms of the start/stop and pretty tedious.

A little over over halfway down on the second page, the entire setup is shown.

Dave

firbikrhd1
06-17-2012, 11:32 PM
Fantastic pictures! Thank you for sharing them. When I see them and think about the manufacturing capability America once had and how so much has gone to China it's sad and frightening.

wierdscience
06-17-2012, 11:46 PM
The last picture on the page shows a hob being relieved and I'm curious what the process was. There's no mechanism to advance and retract the tool that I can see. They mention a very low speed so do you suppose they just do tooth by tooth going around the thing? That sound high stress in terms of the start/stop and pretty tedious.

Full desciption with pictures is here-

http://www.lathes.co.uk/hendey/page11.html

And how it's used is here-

http://www.lathes.co.uk/hendey/page22.html

wierdscience
06-18-2012, 12:10 AM
Hendey lathe in action in this Southbend Training vid-

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DgwsigIyz0c

What that extra hole is for in the tailstocks of older lathes is seen at 2:30

http://youtu.be/DgwsigIyz0c?t=2m30s

beckley23
06-18-2012, 04:41 PM
Connelly gives 3 reasons for a discrepancy in the 2 collars test; out of level, "wind" in the outer ways, and headstock alignment.
Given the permitted tolerance, .0008" in 12" for a newly manufactured, or reconditioned lathe , my first suspect would be out of level, especially if the lathe has been moved. With a used lathe, it's anybody's guess, but with a careful survey, as Forrest is fond of saying, the process of elimination can begin.
Harry

QSIMDO
06-18-2012, 09:33 PM
Though the sign is long gone the gateway in the very first picture of the series is still there on what was then Rt. 25 but is now Rt 202.
Several of the main buildings still exist on Summer St. along with the houses you can see on the left side of the picture.

The building where they loaded the rail cars is still there and I have a piece of the track that I use as a small bench anvil.

Across from the Main office on Summer St. was the American Brass mill which made it somewhat foreboding going through there as a kid. The mill was dark but as you looked inside you could see fires glowing here and there.
Ironically the entire complex burned to the ground in the early '70's in a massive fire fueled by tire storage.

I worked in one of the Hendey buildings in the mid 60's that was converted into a pillow manufacturer, blowing kapok into pillow cases!
The girls were friendly but THAT job didn't last long. ;)