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brian Rupnow
06-22-2012, 08:03 PM
Four years ago when I first bought my lathe and mill, one of the first things I built was a waterwheel to run in the spring fed stream that wanders through my back yard. It is only a small stream, with just enough flow to turn the wheel, with virtualy no extra capacity to power anything. The wheel has turned faithfully for four years, but due to the unusually high mineral content of the water, I get a severe buildup of minerals on the waterwheel, and as it gets heavier and heavier, it turns slower and slower, to the point where I have to bring it in and dismantle it and soak it in CLR to get rid of the deposits. The "arms" are made from 1/4" diameter aluminum rod, and the "paddles" are the ends cut off stainless steel soup ladles. The soup ladles are 3 1/2" in diameter, and the flume box that the wheel runs in is 4 3/4" wide x 8 1/2" deep. (And that holds the entire flow of the stream). As the soup ladle enters the flume box, it is submerged approximately 2 1/2" below the surface of the water when the arm which supports it is vertical. The current waterwheel has 8 spokes at 45 degrees. My intent is to redesign the waterwheel and make the arms from 1/4" fiberglass (which weighs about 62% of what the aluminum arms weigh). The new paddles will be made of plastic and be 3 3/4" wide and a full 6" long, to take better advantage of the water flowing through the flume box. I will take pictures and do a bit of a write up as I proceed with this magnificent feat of engineering, so welcome along for the ride.----Brian
http://i307.photobucket.com/albums/nn294/BrianRupnow/CONTINUATION%20OF%20MAIN%20ALBUM1/WATERWHEELPICS002.jpg
http://i307.photobucket.com/albums/nn294/BrianRupnow/CONTINUATION%20OF%20MAIN%20ALBUM1/WATERWHEELPICS001-1.jpg

brian Rupnow
06-22-2012, 08:04 PM
Yesterday I drove down to Everett and purchased an eight foot length of 1/4" fiberglass rod from a fellow who makes telecommunication antennas. then a hunt through the local Walmart yielded a 7 1/2" diameter plastic plate which was made of heavy enough material that I thought it would make decent paddle material. It has to be sturdy but lightweight, and strong enough to withstand the pressure of the water without flexing.
http://i307.photobucket.com/albums/nn294/BrianRupnow/CONTINUATION%20OF%20MAIN%20ALBUM1/WATERWHEELPICS001.jpg

brian Rupnow
06-22-2012, 08:04 PM
A fit of bandsaw and scissors work yielded a "paddle" 3 3/4" wide x 6" long, and I scrounged around in my junk bin untill I found a piece of aluminum bar 3/8" square x 2 1/2" long. I will post more as this develops.
http://i307.photobucket.com/albums/nn294/BrianRupnow/CONTINUATION%20OF%20MAIN%20ALBUM1/WATERWHEELPICS003.jpg

brian Rupnow
06-22-2012, 08:06 PM
This is ultimately what I want to end up with (Its the same overall diameter as the current waterwheel).
http://i307.photobucket.com/albums/nn294/BrianRupnow/CONTINUATION%20OF%20MAIN%20ALBUM1/ASSYOFWATERWHEEL-1.jpg

brian Rupnow
06-22-2012, 08:06 PM
And in the interest of lighter weight and more power, this waterwheel will have 10 arms and a hub drilled full of lightening holes----
http://i307.photobucket.com/albums/nn294/BrianRupnow/CONTINUATION%20OF%20MAIN%20ALBUM1/HUBFORWATERWHEEL.jpg

brian Rupnow
06-22-2012, 08:07 PM
Since I will have 10 "paddles" and they all have to have a hole in the same spot, a simple wooden jig and aluminum drill guide ensures that they all get the hole in the same place.
http://i307.photobucket.com/albums/nn294/BrianRupnow/CONTINUATION%20OF%20MAIN%20ALBUM1/paddleandarm002.jpg
http://i307.photobucket.com/albums/nn294/BrianRupnow/CONTINUATION%20OF%20MAIN%20ALBUM1/paddleandarm003.jpg

brian Rupnow
06-22-2012, 08:07 PM
Using the same jig, the fiberglass rod is inserted thru the drill guide and thru the 3/8" square aluminum. A measurement is taken from the end of the fiberglass rod to the end of the blue paddle, and a drill small enough to pass thru the #5-40 threaded hole is drilled thru the blue paddle to mark where the clearance holes have to go. Then the paddle and fiberglass is removed from the jig and a 0.128" drill is ran thru these previously marked holes.
http://i307.photobucket.com/albums/nn294/BrianRupnow/CONTINUATION%20OF%20MAIN%20ALBUM1/paddleandarm005.jpg

brian Rupnow
06-22-2012, 08:08 PM
And "Hey Presto" we have one paddle and arm assembly. The jig should ensure that all 10 arms end up the same.---And Oh Yeah, the fiberglass rod is held in the 3/8" square bar and the hub with two part epoxy.
http://i307.photobucket.com/albums/nn294/BrianRupnow/CONTINUATION%20OF%20MAIN%20ALBUM1/paddleandarm006.jpg
http://i307.photobucket.com/albums/nn294/BrianRupnow/CONTINUATION%20OF%20MAIN%20ALBUM1/paddleandarm007.jpg

sasquatch
06-22-2012, 08:16 PM
Good job again,

Interesting posting.--( I'm wondering,,,, will any "Polywogs" be affected by this installation?):p

brian Rupnow
06-22-2012, 08:25 PM
Good job again,

Interesting posting.--( I'm wondering,,,, will any "Polywogs" be affected by this installation?):p
A very good question, Sasquatch, and the answer is no. I live in a fairly deep valley that has a lot of farmland all around on the high ground. My whole area is an aquifer that is fed by the water draining from thie high farmland. The water is so loaded with nitrates from chemical fertilizers that there is virtually no marine life in the water. I do see the occasional frog, but have never in 13 years seen a minnow, polywog, not anything else that you would expect to find in a stream. The spring that feeds my stream bubbles out of a hillside about 1/4 mile uphill from my house. All of our wells are very deep here, primarily to avoid tapping into the nitrate laced surface water.

brian Rupnow
06-23-2012, 08:08 AM
In the picture is a little trick I learned a long time ago for cutting fiberglass rods to length. Wrap a couple of thicknesses of masking tape around the place you want to cut. When you cut through at these points with a hacksaw or bandsaw, the tape keeps the fiberglass from splintering. Same thing applies to house doors that have a veneer finish on them---a double layer of masking tape over the cut line will keep the veneer from splintering and pulling away from the body of the door. I know that not many people are going to be building waterwheels, but everybody that owns a house is going to have to trim a door bottom or top sooner or later.
http://i307.photobucket.com/albums/nn294/BrianRupnow/CONTINUATION%20OF%20MAIN%20ALBUM1/cuttingfiberglass001.jpg

DFMiller
06-23-2012, 09:34 AM
Brian,
Neat looking project. Did you consider using carbon fiber tubing for the shafts? I imagine it would be even lighter.
Thanks for posting the pictures.
Dave

Hawkeye
06-23-2012, 11:09 AM
Used carbon arrow shafts would be light and you can probably get them free if you know an archer. Get some glue in inserts they are threaded 8-32.

gizmo2
06-23-2012, 11:46 AM
Just want to say that I am impressed by the fact you have wild water just running through your property. Here in the high desert of Wyoming, water is hard to come by and worth fighting for... Wells that are just at 300 feet are going dry locally. So it is with great interest that I follow your post!

brian Rupnow
06-23-2012, 11:57 AM
So there we have it----10 new arms and paddles. All I need now is a hub!!!
http://i307.photobucket.com/albums/nn294/BrianRupnow/CONTINUATION%20OF%20MAIN%20ALBUM1/armsandpaddlesfinished001.jpg

brian Rupnow
06-23-2012, 11:59 AM
Brian,
Neat looking project. Did you consider using carbon fiber tubing for the shafts? I imagine it would be even lighter.
Thanks for posting the pictures.
Dave
My local sources for carbon fiber wanted 3 times as much money as I paid for the fiberglass rod.

brian Rupnow
06-23-2012, 12:00 PM
Used carbon arrow shafts would be light and you can probably get them free if you know an archer. Get some glue in inserts they are threaded 8-32.
I ried to find an archery supply locally, but struck out. I only paid $12.50 for the eight foot length of fiberglass rod.

dp
06-23-2012, 12:07 PM
My local sources for carbon fiber wanted 3 times as much money as I paid for the fiberglass rod.

Carbon fiber is crazy expensive. I enjoy flying radio control rags (http://wildrc.com/), and kites that use modern materials for the bones, and it is astonishing the cost of even very small carbon fiber components. Especially so when it is reduced to dust after a minor crash. More and more I'm using brass tubing splints to mend the broken wings :)

DFMiller
06-23-2012, 12:48 PM
My local sources for carbon fiber wanted 3 times as much money as I paid for the fiberglass rod.

Brian,
I will have to remember that next time I dig into my stock of carbon fiber. I think my daughter is using some of it for Halloween decorations. I shall have to repossess it. I forgot how expensive it is.
Looking great as usual Brian!
Dave

Paul Alciatore
06-23-2012, 01:28 PM
Carbon fiber is crazy expensive. I enjoy flying radio control rags (http://wildrc.com/), and kites that use modern materials for the bones, and it is astonishing the cost of even very small carbon fiber components. Especially so when it is reduced to dust after a minor crash. More and more I'm using brass tubing splints to mend the broken wings :)

But I thought the idea of carbon fiber was it's strength as well as it's lack of weight. ?????

My model aircraft experience is at least 40 years out of date so all I remember is balsa wood. It was easy to repair, even after the worst crashes. Next day I was in the air again. Sometimes I added steel pins (literally pins as in sewing style pins) for extra strength where needed when splicing the broken balsa wood. Work good: last a long time. Well, a long time in model aircraft years/days anyway.

The final fate of most of my model aircraft was an inflight explosion when the flames reached the on-board cherry bomb. It's a shame I didn't have a 16 MegaPixel digital camera that took videos back then.

oil mac
06-23-2012, 06:54 PM
For us Brits What is a Pollywog?:confused:

garyphansen
06-23-2012, 07:13 PM
Also called a tadpole= the stage between an egg and a frog or toad.

brian Rupnow
06-23-2012, 08:17 PM
Also called a tadpole= the stage between an egg and a frog or toad.
Not to be confused with a Gollywog!!!!:D :D :eek:

sasquatch
06-23-2012, 08:29 PM
Not a toad, just a baby in between the frog egg and the grown frog .

The teeeny tiny one hatches, and starts to grow a tail,, then legs etc, then the tail disappears, and they grow into a frog.

Very common to see thousands of them , actually black clouds of them in the water when they hatch.

michigan doug
06-23-2012, 11:06 PM
Now that you're going to harvest so much more power, what work are you going to accomplish. Surely you can light a few LED's or something now.

Maybe one of the old toy steam engine "tools" driven by a belt.


Finest regards,

doug

brian Rupnow
06-24-2012, 12:03 PM
Well its together.-----So far, so good----
http://i307.photobucket.com/albums/nn294/BrianRupnow/CONTINUATION%20OF%20MAIN%20ALBUM1/initialassembly002.jpg
http://i307.photobucket.com/albums/nn294/BrianRupnow/CONTINUATION%20OF%20MAIN%20ALBUM1/initialassembly001.jpg

brian Rupnow
06-24-2012, 01:17 PM
So there we have it gentlemen. A short, sweet, succesful project with just enough machining content to make it worth posting.-----Brian
http://i307.photobucket.com/albums/nn294/BrianRupnow/CONTINUATION%20OF%20MAIN%20ALBUM1/th_NEWWATERWHEEL-2.jpg (http://s307.photobucket.com/albums/nn294/BrianRupnow/CONTINUATION%20OF%20MAIN%20ALBUM1/?action=view&current=NEWWATERWHEEL-2.mp4)

sasquatch
06-24-2012, 04:20 PM
AND,,,, May i ask,, "WHERE are the guards for that Bench Grinder" ???:eek: