PDA

View Full Version : Metal shears, why so expensive? Anyone make their own?



vpt
07-26-2012, 10:57 PM
Like the title says. I am interested in a metal shear to keep the shop a but cleaner and use less cutting blades and stuff. But why are they so expensive? Anyone ever make their own? I'd like to be able to cut 2x1/4" bar and smaller as well as 16 or so gauge by 10-12"(maybe more?) and thinner.

Ideas, thoughts, opinions, and stuff?

macona
07-26-2012, 11:10 PM
Lots of metal and engineering in a shear that dont break. You might be able to find an old one and go through it.

loose nut
07-26-2012, 11:20 PM
I bought one, call Groz I think, Polish maybe, several years ago. About $100, will cut up to 1/4 in bar stock or 1/8 in sheet metal. Works good and the price didn't seem to high for what it does.

vpt
07-26-2012, 11:53 PM
What is the size of the shear loose nut? Happen to have a pic? I have no idea what size overall of a shear is needed for 1/4" bar and fairly heavy sheet. $100 is a steal compared to what I am seeing. Unless I am looking at too big of shears.

justanengineer
07-27-2012, 01:31 AM
I would advise patience. While many go nuts for sheetmetal and other "ironworking" tools, many others simply want the space these large chunks of iron reside in.

oldtiffie
07-27-2012, 04:45 AM
If space (and money) are problems, why not use Oxy/Acet or plasma for cutting larger items and "nibblers" (hand-held) which will cut up to 2.5mm (~0.100").

Plasma is not limitted to cutting steel either as it will pretty well cut any metal that conducts electricity.

Hopefuldave
07-27-2012, 05:28 AM
I've always used an angle grinder, a little slower maybe but cuts up to 1" by anything! (2" if you flip the part over) Also it can "plunge cut" in sheet materials, as long as the thickness is pretty small compared to the hole size (e.g. cutouts for sockets in electrical boxes and the like). With a bit of care it can cut within a degree or so of square, better if you have it in a "chop saw" adaptor with a vice and hinge, or clamp on a piece of angle a a guide. A lot smaller than a shear / guillotine / plasma cutter to store, too!

Dave H. (the other one)

loose nut
07-27-2012, 10:34 AM
What is the size of the shear loose nut? Happen to have a pic? I have no idea what size overall of a shear is needed for 1/4" bar and fairly heavy sheet. $100 is a steal compared to what I am seeing. Unless I am looking at too big of shears.

It will shear 10 to 12", sorry I don't have a picture but it is the kind that has a handle that you pull down to pull the top blade across the fixed lower blade, like a pair of scissors.

P.S.

I found this which is similar to the type I have

http://www.busybeetools.com/products/HAND-SHEAR-12IN.-HD.html

RussZHC
07-27-2012, 11:16 AM
After your original post, spent some time looking and I am left with the impression this is one of those times you really get what you pay for in terms of quality, reliability, ease of use v. dollars spent.
I am a bit surprised at the difference in cost between "slitting shear" and "Beverly shear" [also informative since I did not know there were considerable differences]...I am also assuming most of the bigger dollar ones are/were originally meant for production shops, unless I were to change what I am now doing, most of those would be overkill BUT then it becomes the classic case of trying to find something between dirt cheap which will be a project from day one and always needing attention and say a Beverly shear for around $1200 that there is almost no way I will get that amount of value out of...

Edit: I was under impression "Beverly shear" was proper name and it maybe but some info has it looking like it may have been a particular shear made by the Beverly Company and so different the name stuck to the tool in general...found some pics where a slitting shear was labeled as "made by Beverly"

vpt
07-27-2012, 11:17 AM
If space (and money) are problems, why not use Oxy/Acet or plasma for cutting larger items and "nibblers" (hand-held) which will cut up to 2.5mm (~0.100").

Plasma is not limitted to cutting steel either as it will pretty well cut any metal that conducts electricity.


Only issues I have with gas is rough edges, edges need to be ground off to be able to TIG weld (contamination), gas and oxy cost money and is slow to cut and makes a mess. I have been wanting a plasma cutter for awhile but nearly the same deal with having to grind the cut for TIG welding, drops slag on the floor, and is still kind of an ordeal to pull out, plug in, set up, then cut.


I've always used an angle grinder, a little slower maybe but cuts up to 1" by anything! (2" if you flip the part over) Also it can "plunge cut" in sheet materials, as long as the thickness is pretty small compared to the hole size (e.g. cutouts for sockets in electrical boxes and the like). With a bit of care it can cut within a degree or so of square, better if you have it in a "chop saw" adaptor with a vice and hinge, or clamp on a piece of angle a a guide. A lot smaller than a shear / guillotine / plasma cutter to store, too!

Dave H. (the other one)

I am trying to avoid using consumables and making a mess in the shop. An angle grinder/die grinder is normally my very last resort for trying to get something cut. I don't have a shortage of cutting tools, I've got everything from a chop saw and bandsaw to a dremmel tool. The reason I am looking into a shear is for the speed, cleanliness, and no consumables (buy it once and done).


It will shear 10 to 12", sorry I don't have a picture but it is the kind that has a handle that you pull down to pull the top blade across the fixed lower blade, like a pair of scissors.

P.S.

I found this which is similar to the type I have

http://www.busybeetools.com/products/HAND-SHEAR-12IN.-HD.html



That seems to be the common one. Does it have a hard time cutting 1/4" bar stock? It looks to be a nice compact shear that can be mounted on the end of a bench. Is there an in between shear that is bigger than this 10-12" but not the huge 36"+ ones? Thats all I seem to be finding is these 10-12" or the big ones.

loose nut
07-27-2012, 12:05 PM
There are different versions, although they all look alike to me. I use mine for sheet metal with the occasional 1/8" or 3/16" piece of flat bar and very rarely a bit of 1/4" x 2" and it has done it all without any trouble. The
write up that came with mine said 1/8" max but it only has a short handle. Most seem to claim 1/4" max but have a much longer 2 piece handle. There use to be bigger industrial models but I haven't seen one for a long time, power shears are the norm now.

vpt
07-27-2012, 12:41 PM
A power shear would be nice but they take up quite a bit of room. I am hoping for something that can be bench mounted. I think I will be getting rid of a few tools that I haven't used in the last 5 years like my chop saw to make up some room.

EddyCurr
07-27-2012, 02:07 PM
I was under impression "Beverly shear" was proper name and it maybe
but some info has it looking like it may have been a particular shear made by the
Beverly Company and so different the name stuck to the tool in general.My vote is that Beverly Shear has become synonymous with throatless shear,
in the same way Jet Ski (trademark of Kawasaki) and, once upon a time, Sea-Doo
became synonymous with personal watercraft.

Unlike the manual sheet metal shear in loose nut's BusyBee link which is essentially
limited to making straight cuts, a throatless shear is capable of cutting curves as
well as straight sections. A video of the differences:


Cutting Metal: Using a Beverly Shear - Kevin Caron (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j5JGoU2Cps8)


I'd like to be able to cut 2x1/4" bar and smaller as well as 16 or so gauge by 10-12"(maybe
more?) and thinner.

Is there an in-between shear that is bigger than this 10-12", but not the huge 36"+ ones?Another very important criteria is the type of material: steel, aluminum, stainless ...

It is my belief that your requirements limit your selection to a large bench-mounted
plate shear, a big brother to the style shown in the BusyBee link.

The 3-in-1 shear-brake-roll machines that I know of are all rated optimistically at
20 ga for mild steel, in practice this should be held back to 22 ga. I think these
usually jump from 12" to 30" and grow wider from there, although someone may
offer a 24". (An HSM member has modified his machine to beef up the moving
shear and the bed of his 3-in-1 but he still isn't using it for 16 ga, IIRC. I will
look for a thread where he discusses his modifications.)

Old school foot shears rated for 16 ga are sizable pieces of equipment. Here
is a link with pictures of a Brown-Boggs #169b (http://www.westwaymachinery.com/product-catalog/en/96-brown-boggs-gauge-gap-foot-shear-model-169b.html) that will give you an idea of what
kind of mass was deemed necessary to produce a reliable shear in those days.

The MetalMeet forum might be another resource to explore.

.

EddyCurr
07-27-2012, 02:33 PM
(An HSM member has modified his machine to beef up the moving shear and the bed of his 3-in-1
but he still isn't using it for 16 ga, IIRC. I will look for a thread where he discusses his modifications.)The member I have in mind is CCWKen

Here is a link to his thread "For EddyCurr and those following the 3in1 Machine mods" (http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/archive/index.php/t-52030.html) (2012.01.19).
In it he writes that he has cut 18 ga mild steel in 24" lengths with some protest.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0903/CCWKen/ToolBox/ShearPressRoll/ComboReinforced-1.jpg

.

EddyCurr
07-27-2012, 03:00 PM
... although someone may offer a 24".Of course, the Di-Acro Model 24 Hand Shear (http://www.diacro.com/metal-forming/hand-shears.php) is rated for 16 ga.

Pricey. There are some examples on eBay.

.

Stepside
07-27-2012, 09:57 PM
With floor space a premium, I would suggest a vertical band saw and a selection of bands. The throat depth is the limiting factor in with most band saws. The exception being the Roll-In and Marvel type saws, then it is the price of the machine that provides limits. I have built custom guides that force the blade to turn 90 degrees. This then allows any length and the throat of the saw limits the width.

I have a 3in1 sheet metal machine, so when I get a boat I already have an anchor. It is a marginal roller, a poor brake and a low capacity shear all in one package. I will work fine for sheet metal flashing and not much else.

vpt
07-27-2012, 10:03 PM
My vote is that Beverly Shear has become synonymous with throatless shear,
in the same way Jet Ski (trademark of Kawasaki) and, once upon a time, Sea-Doo
became synonymous with personal watercraft.

Unlike the manual sheet metal shear in loose nut's BusyBee link which is essentially
limited to making straight cuts, a throatless shear is capable of cutting curves as
well as straight sections. A video of the differences:


Cutting Metal: Using a Beverly Shear - Kevin Caron (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j5JGoU2Cps8)

Another very important criteria is the type of material: steel, aluminum, stainless ...

It is my belief that your requirements limit your selection to a large bench-mounted
plate shear, a big brother to the style shown in the BusyBee link.

The 3-in-1 shear-brake-roll machines that I know of are all rated optimistically at
20 ga for mild steel, in practice this should be held back to 22 ga. I think these
usually jump from 12" to 30" and grow wider from there, although someone may
offer a 24". (An HSM member has modified his machine to beef up the moving
shear and the bed of his 3-in-1 but he still isn't using it for 16 ga, IIRC. I will
look for a thread where he discusses his modifications.)

Old school foot shears rated for 16 ga are sizable pieces of equipment. Here
is a link with pictures of a Brown-Boggs #169b (http://www.westwaymachinery.com/product-catalog/en/96-brown-boggs-gauge-gap-foot-shear-model-169b.html) that will give you an idea of what
kind of mass was deemed necessary to produce a reliable shear in those days.

The MetalMeet forum might be another resource to explore.

.




Thanks for the video, I may need two shears now!

16 gauge may be optimistic, I wouldn't want to try cutting anything longer than 8-10" with the thicker stuff. 24" would be ideal really. As far as material to be cut I always look at the most used mild steel specs. Stainless I know is always less than steel and aluminum can be a bit thicker. The material I use the most is steel though so like mentioned that is what I look for as far as specs.

From what I have witnessed at the local machine shop with their huge 20' machine is that the cam style 3in1 are very nice for not only shearing but also bending. I was amazed when they took these flat plates, sheared them to size, and C channeled them within seconds. I would be willing to make some space for a decent machine like the 3in1 so long as it bends and cuts when I need it to. Do they work fine for doing thicker 1/4" or so bar around 2" wide or don't the 3in1 type like short stock?

There is a super old 3in1 type local to me for $800, looks to be 1800's though.

firbikrhd1
07-27-2012, 10:05 PM
Everyone has their own idea if what is best for them. For me, because I work with material of various thickness, most of which is over 16ga, a plasma cutter fits best. Mine will cut up to 7/8", doesn't take a lot of room, makes nice clean cuts and even without a CAD setup I can use Masonite templates to cut shapes other than straight lines. It isn't as clean as a shear would be and takes a 10 minutes to set up since it isn't just sitting there, taking up space and ready to go, but I can live with those drawbacks given the flexibility it gives me.

vpt
07-27-2012, 10:15 PM
Of course, the Di-Acro Model 24 Hand Shear (http://www.diacro.com/metal-forming/hand-shears.php) is rated for 16 ga.

Pricey. There are some examples on eBay.

.

Those look nice and with some fairly old ones on ebay they have been around for awhile.

Stepside
07-27-2012, 10:47 PM
By a 3in1 machine are we talking about the bench top machines or are we talking about an "ironworker" with hydraulic power? There is no way in heck you are going to cut 1/4 inch thick material with the bench top manual machines. Most of the smaller manual machines that are rated for 16 gauge have to be in top form to cut rated thickness.

J Tiers
07-28-2012, 12:18 AM
the "pull-down" manual shears will surely cut 1/4" or 5/16"........ round bar.

They rate that one in the link for 1/8" sheet, but I don't know that I believe it.... Those have a problem, the shear is coming down at an angle, and it tends to want to "spit out" thicker stock. I cut rounds and thinner stuff with mine, but there is no way on earth it would cut 1/4" steel plate..... 1/8" would be bad enough, you'd probably have to hang on the lever and bounce.

A "real" shear is straight blade, with a slight shear angle to reduce the force, but nothing like the angle of the one in the link. With a screw setup, you might cut 1/4" plate with a 'straight" press, but I suspect you would work pretty hard. Most are hydraulic or heavy mechanical for that sort of material (and weigh many tons). Otherwise an ironworker will cut 1/4" and make it look easy. Still has an angled blade, but cuts just fine if you keep the thick stuff back in the 'gullet" of the blade...otherwise it makes a heck of a noise and strains the machine..

MrFluffy
07-28-2012, 06:24 AM
I have the pull down type next to my vice, and I don't think I'd try 1/4" on it out of respect for the blade edge. However, for your original application I would say its a good companion.
I find when I'm welding something up, reaching for the shear and cutting off infill pieces to fill in weld gaps rather than trying to weld in bridges. The only real problem I have with it is on longer cuts it tends to put a curve into the material being worked as it has a curve blade to cut progressively, but that is rectified by placing item on vice and tapping it flat...
Round bar is no problem, there is a hole in the two blades which you can feed anything up to about 12mm and sheer it off, but cleanness of cut on the larger stuff depends on the material being sheered, some will shatter or be crystaline in appearance towards the centre. I guess a product of sheering larger material than I should, but its real handy for shortening fasteners quick.

I have a real treadle operated 3hp power sheer, which is a huge old flywheel/clutch driven system and that can sheer 1/4 without sweating, but its sat unpowered in a corner of the barn because I wasn't using it enough and wanted the shop floor space until I finished my next extension to the workshop.

I would look at your usage and see if you need to cut at that 1/4 plate capacity all the time. Or if you can get by with a hand sheer and cut the 1/4 by other means on those odd occasions.

loose nut
07-28-2012, 09:43 AM
but there is no way on earth it would cut 1/4" steel plate.....

Mostly right.

They can cut narrow pieces of 3/16 and 1/4" plate but I wouldn't do it all the time, hard on the blade, as is cutting round bar if there isn't a special place to do that. That being said we used to have a heavy duty version of these at work, power driven of course, that would cut much heavier thickness of plate. You cut a bit and slid the plate in and cut some more. The basic design can do it but it isn't easy and could be dangerous which is why it was scrapped.

Anyone who reads the old Model Engineer mags may remember several different homemade designs for these shears over the years, so it can be done. There should be info on the web for these.

EddyCurr
07-30-2012, 09:52 PM
There are bar cutters with an action that holds the material from
moving away from the blade - one application is for rebar. There
may be other variations intended for square and rectangular shapes.
I have a Di-Acro designed for shearing round bar.

That said, for occasional use, I suggest considering a 'cold' saw for
free-hand cutting of the size of bar ( 2" x 1/4" and smaller ) vpt mentions.
Pull it out from under the bench, do the job and then put it away, again.
Offers 'cool' cuts and clean, undeformed bar ends.

These were discussed a year or more ago when gwilson was looking for
a way to cut sections of difficult material. (However, a brief struggle with
the new & improved search engine proves fruitless at locating same ...)


7-1/4" Metal Cutting Circular Saw (http://www.harborfreight.com/7-1-4-quarter-inch-metal-cutting-circular-saw-8897.html)

7 in. Metal Cutting Circular Saw (http://www.princessauto.com/pal/product/8380263/7-1/4-In/7-in.-Metal-Cutting-Circular-Saw)

8 in Milwaukee Metal Cutting Saw (6370-21) (http://www.milwaukeetool.com/tools/saws-corded/metal-cutting-saws/8-inch-metal-cutting-saw-kit/6370-21)


14" bench mounted versions of similar saw are available, too. But vpt
already has his chop saw, a higher speed unit with an abrasive disk.

.

EddyCurr
07-30-2012, 10:00 PM
These were discussed a year or more ago when gwilson was looking for
a way to cut sections of difficult material.

Metal Cutting Circular Saws (http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/threads/49390-Metal-Cutting-Circular-Saws) 2011.08.12

How To Cut Navel Brass Thread (http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/threads/49290-How-to-cut-1-2-quot-thick-Naval-brass) 2011.08.06

.

vpt
07-30-2012, 11:31 PM
I never said 1/4" plate. lol

I said I would like a shear that can cut a 1/4" x 2-3" wide (bar?) stock. Also around (up to) 16 gauge sheet (20-24" would be nice).

madokie
07-31-2012, 02:06 AM
if you have a hydralic stand up press,well theirs half your shear machine right there.just design and make a shear tool that uses the 20 or whatever ton down force of the press,keeps from using up all your workshop space,and saves you money.of course this is just a simple cutting tool , not a prescision shear tool.if you need precise shearing you will have to spend the bucks one way or another.

Ries
07-31-2012, 02:34 AM
cutting sheet and cutting bar stock requires two different tools.

Sheet metal shears are more like paper cutters.
Long, thin blades.
Or the rotary shears, or a Beverly style shear- but neither is set up to cut flat bar.

Cutting bar stock, even just 1/4" x 3", requires a whole different blade geometry and a more rigid frame and thicker, sturdier blade.

They used to make really cool hand operated ironworkers- tools that would cut flat bar, punch holes, cut round and square bar, and sometimes notch.
The Germans still make em- like these Glasers.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/rniemi/glasershear.jpg
They used to make em in the USA, but mostly before the second world war.http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v132/rniemi/shears.jpg

RussZHC
07-31-2012, 08:15 AM
Ries: great illustrations

vpt: there is one (or more, first I found) on ebay that pretty much fits your criteria http://www.ebay.com/itm/ROD-PARTER-METAL-SHEAR-/150866875271?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item23205dd387 but its a ways away (just down the road from Ries!)

and there is another actually from the catalog Ries posted a pic of http://www.ebay.com/itm/Buffalo-Angle-Iron-Shear-Punch-Blacksmith-Shear-Shear-1-4-x-2-1-4-Angle-/390447509053?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item5ae87c2e3d

Edit: to add, to me the neat configuration, if one is looking for ideas is this one http://www.ebay.com/itm/Pell-Hydrashear-P-1125-Model-P-Hydra-Shear-USED-/200784444195?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item2ebfaf7b23
a perhaps somewhat limited use (wire cable) but given the stated purpose in the ad (elevator repairman e.g.) it is pretty compact...I happen to have a short throw car jack waiting to contribute more so...not sure what you do for high quality cutting blades though...

vpt
07-31-2012, 12:38 PM
Great stuff!

Ries, I would agree with you however when I was in school they had a nice somewhat compact shear that did both bar stock and sheet perfectly. The machine (hydraulic) was used by everyone for pretty much everything! 1/4" 4-5" bar was like butter to the machine. The whole thing only took up about a 3'x2' space on the floor. It also had a hole punch on it, angle shear, and a couple other options I never used. I have never seen a machine like it again.

vpt
07-31-2012, 12:57 PM
I guess the one I remember was more of an iron worker than an actual shear but it did have a strait shear on it (main thing used) that did as thin of sheet as anyone could find.

With all these schools dumping trade classes maybe I should run by there again and se if it is for sale or stuck in the back shed or something. :D

Ries
07-31-2012, 02:11 PM
Around here, schools are not dumping trade classes, they are actually building new ones- we just built a Marine Technology Center, that both high school students and Community College kids are going to, learning things like carbon fiber layup.

Anyway, most ironworkers are not great for sheet- even if they have a long blade. You adjust blade clearance differently to cut different thicknesses. So an ironworker rated for 1/2" plate will have more of a clearance gap between the blades than a shear for 16 gage- and most of the bigger shears dont cut thin sheet very well.

An ironworker is an amazing tool to have- I have had one in my shop for well over ten years now, and I love it. There are a few small ones, that are quite svelte and take up very little space.

Mubea used to make a really cool little mechanical, the BF-10
http://www.benoitsheetmetal.com/product.aspx?p_id=576723&print=1
my late friend Grant had a great little vertical american made mechanical from the fifties- it was a Wysong, and it was very compact.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Ironworker-Wysong-Power-3-x-3-x-1-4-Approx-20-Ton-Punch-Flats-Angles-/350500893721#ht_500wt_1019

vpt
08-01-2012, 10:41 AM
Thanks for the tips and input! I believe I am understanding better now The differences in all the different shears. I am in no hurry for a shear so I will continue to read and watch for a good used one local. I believe I will be watching for one of those beverly shears just because they are so small and look very handy!. I will also be watching for a small iron worker I believe. I guess I will have to just look at a few of them until I find the one with all the things I want it to have.

928gene928
08-01-2012, 10:47 AM
One place to look would be Harbor Freight. They have two different sizes of 3 in 1 machines that can do a fairly good job on thiner materials.

R W
08-01-2012, 10:47 PM
Plans to build your own are in Workshop Equipment 4
"How to make cutting-shears for sheet metal."
Rob Hitchings.

Rosco-P
08-02-2012, 12:35 PM
One place to look would be Harbor Freight. They have two different sizes of 3 in 1 machines that can do a fairly good job on thiner materials.

The O.P.'s requirement:
I said I would like a shear that can cut a 1/4" x 2-3" wide (bar?) stock. Also around (up to) 16 gauge sheet (20-24" would be nice). Andy

3 in 1 isn't going to do that. Well, maybe it will, just once.... 16ga. in mild steel, narrow width is usually the max for one of these combo machines.

RussZHC
08-02-2012, 08:41 PM
I will also be watching for a small iron worker I believe. I guess I will have to just look at a few of them until I find the one with all the things I want it to have.

Not an endorsement but found this company: http://www.metalprocorp.com/ and from my view one good feature is the use of
110v on a 20 amp circuit...certainly not cheap but relatively speaking, not too outrageous IMO, unfortunately, it looks like nearly everything even the basics are "add on", so more $$$.

To me it is sort of aimed at the home shop re: size (both usefulness but also physical size) and capabilities

vpt
08-02-2012, 09:51 PM
Plans to build your own are in Workshop Equipment 4
"How to make cutting-shears for sheet metal."
Rob Hitchings.


Thanks! When I was thinking "make my own" I had an idea of using two car cylinder heads as the backers for the blades.



Not an endorsement but found this company: http://www.metalprocorp.com/ and from my view one good feature is the use of
110v on a 20 amp circuit...certainly not cheap but relatively speaking, not too outrageous IMO, unfortunately, it looks like nearly everything even the basics are "add on", so more $$$.

To me it is sort of aimed at the home shop re: size (both usefulness but also physical size) and capabilities

Thanks for the link, nice looking machines for sure.

sasquatch
08-02-2012, 10:47 PM
Andy,, this may or may not be of help to you.

I have seen these built utilizing the knives out of a "square Baler," Those knives are pretty stout and tough! Check if anyone around your'e area has a couple kicking around, and check them out.
Farm equipment places will know what they are.

legendboy
08-03-2012, 12:09 AM
this is the one thing i am going to miss about my job

i have a key and full use of the shop which includes a 12' accushear, 12' allsteel brake, big punch presses, steel & alum mig, big drill presses, paint booth, tons of metal stock...etc

vpt
08-03-2012, 12:18 PM
Andy,, this may or may not be of help to you.

I have seen these built utilizing the knives out of a "square Baler," Those knives are pretty stout and tough! Check if anyone around your'e area has a couple kicking around, and check them out.
Farm equipment places will know what they are.


Thanks much for the tip, I will look and ask around and see what I can come up with. Just for knowledge on the subject though what metal are shear blades normally made out of? Is it a spring steel?

I have a few 36" railroad sections I have been looking for a use for as well.

lazlo
08-03-2012, 02:48 PM
Plans to build your own are in Workshop Equipment 4

What's "Workshop Equipment"? Who's the publisher?

Tamper84
08-03-2012, 08:31 PM
I've used iron workers before. I didn't realize they came that small......hmmmmm. That would be nice to have!!!

R W
08-04-2012, 04:03 AM
What's "Workshop Equipment"? Who's the publisher?

Intermediate Technology Publications 1985.
9 King Street. London WC2E, U.K.

ISBN 0 946688 11 7
Printed by the Russell Press Ltd, Nottingham. U.K.