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View Full Version : Floors, whats the best, coating, stick on, bare, what do you have, what have you seen



vpt
08-03-2012, 01:20 PM
I want to do something with the floor in my shop. Mainly under the hoist for fluids and stuff. I always thought I wanted to do the roll on, brush on epoxy coating. But it is quite a lot of work it seems mostly to clean and prep the floor before coating. I also hear some people complain about peal up and wear out with the coating.

So lately I have been seeing pics of floors where 'stick on' tiles have been used and looks nice. Anyone have any experience with the stick on tiles and how they hold up to abuse? I'd assume they are fairly easily replaced if something happens to one.

Looking for ideas. Shop has a cement floor. It seems all vehicle fluids, welding splatter from the MIG, lots of grinding material, and all kinds of metal wheels from the cherry picker, trans jack, etc.

I like the checkered look, this shop sparked my stick on tile interest.

http://www.alldoing.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/garage-floor-tiles-1-509x381.jpg

kendall
08-03-2012, 02:09 PM
There are a lot that are able to handle spills without getting stained. Few that will handle hot weld splatter or chips though, And most will deform under any appreciable weight.

A good floor paint in a common color with periodic touch ups is the method I used in the foot areas, sealer and a bucket of water with spic and span or TSP coupled with a good scrub brush every week for the work areas.

That floor in the pic doesn't look like a working shop.

Dr Stan
08-03-2012, 02:28 PM
That floor in the pic doesn't look like a working shop.

Amen to everything kendall said. I put down an epoxy floor coating I bought from Sam's Club when I built my shop. Since the concrete floor was brand new it did not have any stains, etc that I had to deal with nor did I have to move any equipment etc.

Pros

It sure increased the light in the shop since I used an off white coating.

It's easy to clean up spills and easier to sweep & mop than bare concrete.

I did not have any problems with pealing since it was a virgin floor.

Cons

A lot of work to put down and did not cover as well as expected. Buy at least one extra kit.

Does not hold up in my welding area, but that really was not unexpected.

Comments

Make sure you have plenty of ventilation and try to schedule it for a day in the 70's to low 80's max. This will give you more working time before it sets up. Also shoot for as low of humidity as possible.

Since it sounds like you're thinking about doing this on an existing floor, clean it like you're going to perform surgery on it. Some manufacturers suggest etching the floor and that sounds like a good idea.

Wear some old golf shoes when putting down the floor. They will allow you to walk on the wet floor and the little marks from the spikes will "heal" themselves before it sets up.

Mike of the North
08-03-2012, 02:55 PM
I used a concrete stain on my floor, it is holding up OK, but gas softens it. There is a good forum called Garage Journal that has a flooring section that might contain some good info for you. http://www.garagejournal.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=20

J Weber
08-03-2012, 07:00 PM
I have had problems making any paint stick long term to concrete.Color in the mix when pouring is the best way.Here is the 2nd best IMHO.
We had a warehouse at my last place of employment.They drove big trucks,forklifts and pallet jacks all over this place.If you looked close the concrete was not in the best of shape.Big chips and cracks everywhere.But floor all looked uniform paper bag brown and shiny. I asked one of the guys working there about it,He showed me what they used and it was a concrete and terrazzo sealer.They even had a floor buffer to make it shine.Scratch it,black tire marks...just strip that part and recoat.This stuff is basically a water based floor wax.A 5 gal bucket will go a long way.

Fasttrack
08-03-2012, 10:21 PM
Is there any reason not to keep the concrete bare beyond aesthetics? I was never concerned with oil stains - any spills get cleaned up with absorbent, but the stain never bothered me... I say just wipe the whole thing down with used oil right off the bat :D (just kidding)

JoeLee
08-03-2012, 10:22 PM
My shop floor is polished and sealed concrete. Smooth as glass, sweeps real easy with out raising dust and heavy machines slide or roll with ease.
No problem with spills or hot chips/sparks etc. Caution slipper when wet! But it never gets wet.

JL....................

vpt
08-03-2012, 10:42 PM
Yes, that was one another thing, my shop gets wet from rain or snow.

I just looked up that ZEP stuff which sounds like the "wax" mentioned. Sounds very interesting but I imagine slippery when wet too.

http://www.zep.com/ZepSearch/default1.aspx?search=Finishes&num=20&match=Exact&country=U

vpt
08-03-2012, 11:00 PM
Anyone have any experience with the POR stuff? I know I got some of the rust POR paint on the floor years ago and it is still there. lol

http://www.por15.com/Floor-Armor-Concrete-Coating/products/15/

Fasttrack
08-03-2012, 11:40 PM
Anyone have any experience with the POR stuff? I know I got some of the rust POR paint on the floor years ago and it is still there. lol

http://www.por15.com/Floor-Armor-Concrete-Coating/products/15/

I have had great results with their product on steel, including their high heat paint but never tried the concrete stuff. Have you considered sodium silicate? It does a great job permanently sealing concrete.

vpt
08-04-2012, 12:36 AM
Thats interesting. http://www.wetsealers.com/CONSEAL1000.html

Mr Fixit
08-04-2012, 01:29 AM
vpt,
I was able to seal my shop when first built so I don't have any used floor experience, but what I did find at the masonary supply company in town was many types of sealers that are very resistant to any liquids and heavy wheeled equipment and what I used was a clear sealer. The other advantage of sealing the floor is you don't have any cement dust from the floor wearing down and it is much easyer to cleanup after an oil spill or gasoline.
Just one more idea for you to chew on. Let us know what you do, allways like to here how it works out.

Best of luck Chris :)
Mr fixit for the family

Ian B
08-04-2012, 06:04 AM
Joe,

You mention a 'polished and sealed' floor. I'm in the process of getting a new workshop, the floor will be finished by power trowelling - those machines like flying saucers that keep skimming th esurface with steel blades until the concrete's set. This will give it the polish. Did you do this, and did you do anything further?

Ian

MrFluffy
08-04-2012, 11:11 AM
Don't polish a normal concrete mix unless you have additives in there to aid traction. It'll be like a skating rink when you get even plain water on it otherwise. We did a outdoor bbq area testing our power float before doing the house proper, and it was a bit lethal when it was damp. We had to add grit to a screed on top of it in the end. For my workshop, I only used the power float twice to get it level, not polish at all. That left a gritty level surface but it doesn't give you that shiny hard coating on top.
I think next time I do a workshop type floor I might experiment with some traction assisting additives and try polishing it to a better surface.

JoeLee
08-04-2012, 11:30 AM
Joe,

You mention a 'polished and sealed' floor. I'm in the process of getting a new workshop, the floor will be finished by power trowelling - those machines like flying saucers that keep skimming th esurface with steel blades until the concrete's set. This will give it the polish. Did you do this, and did you do anything further?

Ian
Yes that is how I did my floor,with a power trowel. After the concrete has started to set I went to work on it. I would have to sprinkle water here and there to get the cream to come to the surface and you have to watch how you feather the trowels on the machine too. I think it's also called burning in. This type of finish also makes for a much harder surface. It's easy to sweep and oil spills are easy to wipe up.
The next day I rolled a coat of crystal clear concrete floor sealer on it.
I forgot to mention that when I poured the floor I screeded it and used a bull float to get it as flat as possible. I didn't want any dips in it.

JL......................

vpt
08-04-2012, 12:25 PM
You guys have some pics of these floors?

I think it is a case of just seeing a pic of something and wanting it. I know I have looked at coatings before and after awhile I just figured I would leave the bare cement. Then I'll see a pic of another shop with a nice floor and it starts over again.

The main reason I would like something is to keep the oil stains off the floor. Many times I was thinking I would like just a section of coating under the lift but I hear so much about corners pealing up when you do patches instead of the whole floor.

A pad won't work because I need to roll wheels around by the lift like I mentioned engine hoist, engine stand, trans jack, etc. Also it can't be slippery which I assume can be taken care of with just about any kind of coating with a grit or something in it.

I wish I would have gotten more involved when the cement was poured for the shop. But the only thing I mentioned was get fibermesh so it can take a hoist. Would have been nice to blueprint and brainstorm ideas. I would have liked to have lights in the floor under the hoist as well.

Maybe just forget about the floor and get another tool? lol

Forrest Addy
08-04-2012, 01:37 PM
Depends on the function of the floor. Are you speaking of a funcional shop floor subject to spills, heavy scuffing loads, harsh solvents etc like a basic machine shop floor then there are two best choices. Bare painted concrete and vertical grain wood block. One is dirt cheap the other is expensive.

Any shop floor coating in a machine shop - often the floor itself - is inevitably damaged by daily service. Personally I prefer concrete painted with cheap mis-mix interior latex in neutral colors. The stuff is impervious to hot chips and hot work but it wears quickly. If lightly damaged it can be cleaned, prepped, and patch painted in a half hour. If heavily damaged it can be washed off with water based cleaners, wrinsed, and re-coated in an afternoon. The latex offfers superior foot traction even when a little oily.

My chief objections to impervious gloss coatings is a teaspoon of spilled oil turns into 100 sq ft skating rink.

If apperarance is your goal then there are many products out there to competing for your dollar. Floor treatments like oil paint, catylized coatings with color chips, checkered tile, and snap-together squares work well but have to be kept clean. They are not cood in an industrial shop. Hot chips melt into them. Solvents lift cemented vinyl; spilled liquids pose footing hazards and flow through snap together squares. There is no solution to a quart of spilled oil but to take up and clean whatever parts of a snap-together floor lies downhill from the spill site.

If showroom handsome is your goal then catalized coatings, checkered tile etc are your best choice. Their attractiveness cannot be denied but keeping them nice in an industrial setting will be maintenence cost requiring a separate budget line item. Another point is what happens to the snap together floor when Mr Hot Rod tries a burn out?

vpt
08-04-2012, 02:26 PM
All good points and much of what I am thinking.

The simple latex paint sounds appealing. I believe I have seen the like before. Some places it seems to hold up great while others it is pealing up all over the place. Some places I remember seeing where they just kept painting over and over again so the floor is uneven and you can see where the old paint chipped or pealed away and they just painted over it.

I may have to use different types of coverings/coatings for different areas of the shop to put up with different environments.

H380
08-04-2012, 04:03 PM
I want to do something with the floor in my shop. Mainly under the hoist for fluids and stuff. I always thought I wanted to do the roll on, brush on epoxy coating. But it is quite a lot of work it seems mostly to clean and prep the floor before coating. I also hear some people complain about peal up and wear out with the coating.

So lately I have been seeing pics of floors where 'stick on' tiles have been used and looks nice. Anyone have any experience with the stick on tiles and how they hold up to abuse? I'd assume they are fairly easily replaced if something happens to one.

Looking for ideas. Shop has a cement floor. It seems all vehicle fluids, welding splatter from the MIG, lots of grinding material, and all kinds of metal wheels from the cherry picker, trans jack, etc.

I like the checkered look, this shop sparked my stick on tile interest.

http://www.alldoing.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/garage-floor-tiles-1-509x381.jpg

I think that floor is Race Deck. Or something like it.
http://www.racedeck.com/index.html

It is actually a floating floor made up of plastic tiles that snap together. Not cheep at all. We installed them in the turbine shop at work 6 months ago. It looks to be holding up longer than the traditional gray epoxy floor paint.

vpt
08-04-2012, 05:53 PM
I think that floor is Race Deck. Or something like it.
http://www.racedeck.com/index.html

It is actually a floating floor made up of plastic tiles that snap together. Not cheep at all. We installed them in the turbine shop at work 6 months ago. It looks to be holding up longer than the traditional gray epoxy floor paint.


Yes that does look like the racedeck stuff. It looks as though racedeck doesn't have a smooth finish tile no matter how expensive they are. Any kind of little pockets or diamond surface isn't metal wheel friendly.

I was more so just using the pic just to show a tile system. If tile I was thinking a flat stick on tile style like:

http://img.ehowcdn.com/article-new/ehow/images/a05/mi/cn/install-stick-tiles-over-plywood-800x800.jpg

vpt
08-04-2012, 05:56 PM
And this:

http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y8/gb70/detached%20garage/greg_s_new_floor_4.jpg

H380
08-04-2012, 07:20 PM
Steel wheels kill any nice surface. It only depends on how much weight and how often you use the area to how long it will take.

MrFluffy
08-04-2012, 07:38 PM
And this:

http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y8/gb70/detached%20garage/greg_s_new_floor_4.jpg

That shop says to me "no actual work is ever undertaken in this shop".

J. R. Williams
08-04-2012, 07:43 PM
My vote is to use the end grain wood block floor material. Very durable.
JRW

Brett Hurt
08-04-2012, 10:04 PM
I had these guys do mine I look at all this and went with http://www.irondriveupstatesc.com/ go look at there web sit it looks great I went with red so stuff i drop I can see Brett

vpt
08-05-2012, 01:49 PM
Those guys look like they do a great job and lifetime warranty is nice. But they don't leave SC. lol


Reading more, some guys like the cheaper stick on tiles from like lowes, home depot, etc. Some said they had pealing problems with them but may have installed them wrong.

I had a novel idea yesterday. I can test out one of these ideas on the house garage to see how I like it and how it holds up before putting anything in the shop.

http://i37.photobucket.com/albums/e73/cobradriver/Build%20Pics/100_2353.jpg

fjk
08-05-2012, 02:25 PM
For a home basement/hobby general purpose workshop, I use drylok on the floors and walls.
White on the walls, gray on the floor.
It helps keep moisture down (e main reason we did it!)
Thefloorpaint stands up fairly well to my level of use/abuse which at must has been dragging some clothes washers and driers across it.
Don't know how well it would do with dragging heavy stuff across it or if assaulted with "interesting" chemicals

Frank