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Fasttrack
08-05-2012, 01:23 PM
Maybe a long shot, but is there anyone else on the forum that owns a 50's era Kearney Trecker 2D? They have the wiring diagrams printed and glued to the door of the control enclosure, but mine is unreadable due to a transformer mishap. If your diagram is intact, I would greatly appreciate a detailed picture!

I've got a second 70's era K&T 2D but it's 6 hours away and the control box looks quite a bit different.

Grind Hard
08-05-2012, 01:37 PM
Hate to mention that Other Forum, but maybe Practical Machinist would be a better place to ask this.

Fasttrack
08-05-2012, 01:39 PM
Hate to mention that Other Forum, but maybe Practical Machinist would be a better place to ask this.

:) Just posted there, too. Figured I'd canvas the whole town ;)

kc5ezc
08-05-2012, 08:03 PM
Fasttrack: How do you like the KT 2D. Useable in the home shop? Or really better for job or production shops.
I have my eye on one, but just not sure it fits my farm/ranch/hsm needs. They are really heavy, but do some things that BPs and other mills just won't handle. My minimill and Atlas horizontal are just barely getting by for me.
I know only I can make the decision, but would appreciate your input.
Thanks.

Fasttrack
08-05-2012, 10:06 PM
Fasttrack: How do you like the KT 2D. Useable in the home shop? Or really better for job or production shops.
I have my eye on one, but just not sure it fits my farm/ranch/hsm needs. They are really heavy, but do some things that BPs and other mills just won't handle. My minimill and Atlas horizontal are just barely getting by for me.
I know only I can make the decision, but would appreciate your input.
Thanks.

BUY IT! It's the most versatile machine I own; when I had to decide what was the first machine I wanted to bring to Indiana with me, I chose it. My other options were any one of my Pacemaker lathes, a shaper, a 24" Avey drill press, or a Milwaukee mill (or my Smithy 3-in-1). It is best suited to small or complex parts. Despite it's rigidity, it's not meant to be a rough hogging machine. It's an extremely accurate machine and has an infinitely variable speed control that goes from 250 to 4000 rpm. It's only got a 1/2 HP spindle motor and was only meant to accept up to 1/2" shank tooling. In my opinion, you can't find a better mill for a home shop, provided you have the room for it.

The 2D (marketed as a "die sinking" mill - built for machining complex and highly accurate pieces) is about the coolest manual mill you'll find. Not sure how much you know about them, but it's unique in that the head itself rotates, so it's kind of like you get a built-in rotary table. The rotary head can cut up to an 8" diameter circle. Combine this action with an actual rotary table and you can produce some very complicated geometries. It's got a integral coolant return system with a coolant pump and air compressor built into the machine. It's got a motor for the rapid traverse in the knee (if so equipped, not all of them had this - many just had manual feed on the knee), a motor for the longitudinal feed and a motor for rotary head. There is also auto down feed for the quill and, while the manual says it's rated for up to a 3/4" drill bit, I wouldn't push it that hard. Big drills belong on a big drill press or hogging machine ... 1/2 horse motor just doesn't cut it.

They came with two different size tables. The longer table is 36" wide by 18" deep and is really handy. That's what I like best about mine; it has a lot more table surface area and longitudinal travel than even the biggest turret mills. Also notice that the table is fully supported no matter where it is, unlike turret mills were part of the table hangs off the ways. Also, the ways on the 2D are enormous, which leads to reduced wear since there is less pressure on the bearing surfaces. They also have built in covers/holders for dial indicators with tracks to hold gauge blocks (very useful before the advent of the DRO!)


I originally bought my 1957 2D for myself and picked up a Milwaukee vertical 2CH mill for my BIL who is a full time row crop farmer. After about a month, he decided he needed a 2D because it was so handy and we ended up buying another one about a year later. It's been extremely handy in a farm shop and in a machine shop. I just can't say enough good things about them!

They are 3 phase machines, but don't let that "phase" you. If you're on a farm, you may already have access to 3 phase and, if not, a phase converter is no problem.

The other thing to be aware of is the spindle itself. Most of them take Kearney Trecker's "Z" collets, which you probably aren't going to find. Luckily, the Z collet holder is just an insert in the spindle (not many people realize this, based on what I've read). You can remove the collet holder and you'll find the spindle has a NMTB 30 spindle, IIRC but no draw bar. I've been using the Z collets, but eventually I will post a thread about an adapter that goes from the NMTB 30 taper to the ER series. It needs a little tweaking so the collet holder is retained via a threaded collar instead of a drawbar, but beyond that, it's not that big of a deal.

If you have any specific questions, feel free to PM me. I've been pretty busy lately, but I'll try to get back to you quickly.