PDA

View Full Version : Need some assistance with a 4x6 metal cutting bandsaw..



CMcmillan
09-05-2012, 07:15 AM
Hello,
I'm in the market for a good 4x6 metal cutting bandsaw. I will be using it in the vertical position 95% of the time as I cut steel stock 1/4" thick on down, mainly stainless steels for making knives.
I have it down between a harbor freight and a grizzly. Now I know this is a big debate, please leave all of that out of this...I'm just trying to get facts from hands on use.

The way I'm seeing it is the harbor freight model is what a lot of people have, and it's good bang for your buck - BUT it does need modified a little bit (new blade isn't a problem, any new saw should get a new quality bi-metal blade put on), the gearbox needs drained, cleaned from all the sand and grime, and reoiled, it needs realignment, and some out of the box aren't even lined up properly in regards to the angle in the horizontal position and would need taken back as it can't be fixed. I also hear the hardware is on too tight and the parts are tempered wrong and break sometimes, etc

The Grizzly, on the other hand, I'm hearing is the same model, casting, same exact machine, so on and so forth, however I hear the quality control is better, assembly is better, and it would not need the gearbox cleaned, need realigned, or any of the stuff that the harbor freight would need....other than a new stand probably which is no big deal and a new bi metal blade. So if no work is necessary like on the harbor freight I see the added price for the Grizzly worth it. Plus I have heard the grizzly motors are a tad better.

Any input on this is appreciated, I'm looking to order one in the next week. Harbor freight would be picked up locally, Grizzly would have to be shipped. I don't mind the price difference if the Grizzly has better tolerances and won't need all the time/modifications put in like I hear the harbor freight model needs. Thanks

bosox
09-05-2012, 10:19 AM
Most new machines don’t have good quality blades with them. Try this site for blades: www.sawblade.com.

ogre
09-05-2012, 10:27 AM
Im not even looking for one but just with what you said ,id be sold on the grizzly.

JoeLee
09-05-2012, 10:37 AM
If you going to be cutting with the saw in the vertical position most of the time I wolud suggest that you buy a vertical metal cutting band saw.
Reason being the horizontal / vertical saws have bearings for the blade guides, in the vertical position all the filings fall right between the rollers and stick to the blade forcing the guide bearings to open and with that increase in gap the blade tends to wander. Not a good design for vertical cutting. OK for ocasional use. A true vertical bandsaw shold have solid blade guides.

JL...................

bosox
09-05-2012, 10:49 AM
IMHO, horizontal band saws are used mostly for metal cutting and vertical for wood cutting. It’s seldom that a vertical saw is used mainly for metal cutting.

sch
09-05-2012, 11:52 AM
My Enco 4x6 has a very small table and relies on gravity to hold the saw in the upright position so the blade is tilted back about 5D from vertical and is aligned with the long axis of the saw. Auxiliary tables are sometimes included that bolt on and make vertical use a bit more friendly. You are aware of the yahoo group: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/4x6bandsaw/messages where some specific suggestions
to facilitate vertical use might be found. FWIW the saw table on mine is 32" high in the vertical position, ok for my 66" height but if you are a lot taller you might find it low.
Wood cutting saws need blade tensions less than half of metal cutting bandsaws in addition to the 10X FPM speed of the cutting wood versus metal. 4x6 saws are meant to operate with blade tensions
in the 15-20Kpsi range, which actually requires an auxiliary handle to be placed on the blade tension knob to reach for those of us with normal physiques.

kd4gij
09-05-2012, 12:02 PM
IMHO, horizontal band saws are used mostly for metal cutting and vertical for wood cutting. It’s seldom that a vertical saw is used mainly for metal cutting.

Vertical band saws are verry common in metal work. most shops have both. There is alot of things that can't be cut on a horizontal saw. The small 4x6 saws will do both but aukward in the virtical position.

shawnspeed
09-05-2012, 12:18 PM
I hafta kinda agree with kd4gij...most of the fab shops I have worked in had at least 1 vert bandsaw, most did not have a horizontal....they had chop saws, both abrasive & cold...When I had my fab buisness I had a combo to start and then found a lincln 14 " (production tool house brand) resonable , with a blade welder , now the old combo saw rarely gets used....Shawn

PaulT
09-05-2012, 12:36 PM
I bought a 4x6 over 20 years ago, thinking it would be a temporary saw until I could afford a better horizontal saw and a "real" vertical saw to complement my BP clone mill and 12" lathe.

Big surprise, the $200. saw has done everything I've needed for horizontal usage.

Regarding vertical use I didn't end up needing a vertical saw as much as I thought I would, likely having added a CNC BP mill reduced the need for that.

But even before I added the CNC mill when I have needed a vertical saw the 4x6 has worked well, instead of standing I just sit on a shop chair while using it. It works better than you might think as a vertical saw, even with its flimsy appearing table.

The sheet metal stand on these saws and its wheels really suck though. I took the wheels off the stand and used angle iron to weld up a subframe that the sheet metal stand ends is a tight wedge fit into and I put decent caster wheels on this subframe. This really stablized the saw and has worked really well.

I can't believe the thing has lasted this long, even with the original motor, we just used it yesterday to cut 100 aluminum blanks and then put it in vertical mode to cut a required slot in the finished machined parts. Buying good quality blades is essential though.

Paul T.
www.springtest.com (http://www.springtest.com)

bosox
09-05-2012, 12:41 PM
Sorry, I do not work in a fabrication shop. I just do a little woodworking. Anyways, thanks for the heads up!

Dan Dubeau
09-05-2012, 01:02 PM
We've got 4 saws here at work. 2 horizontals, a roll in, and a vertical. all used for metal cutting. I just spent probably close to 2 hours this morning using the vertical to rough out some parts. Very handy.

bosox
09-05-2012, 02:05 PM
What are the brands of your saw?

Dan Dubeau
09-05-2012, 02:58 PM
The roll in is a baxter verticut, the vertical is a powermatic, one horizontal is a big forte, and the other one is a little asian import.

Paul Alciatore
09-05-2012, 03:39 PM
I have purchased two of these band saws from Grizzly and was happy with both of them. The first one was about 10 years ago and it is the better of the two. The later one, about 5 years ago did run a bit rougher - perhaps a balance problem. It was for my employer so I did not have any time to look into that.

I have been in both HF stores and a Grizzly showroom and I can say that the former did not impress me while the latter did. I have purchased smaller items from HF and they did server the purpose. And you can always take them back: I did on more than one occasion. The largest thing I have purchased from HF is a hammer drill. I needed it for three or four holes in old, well cured concrete so it was well worth the sale price and it did them like a knife through butter. How many more holes it may be good for, I don't know. But I am happy with that purchase just for those few. But I would easily go to Grizzly for this or any other machine purchase for any thing that I will use on a more constant basis. My mill: Grizzly My band saw: Grizzly My air compressor: Grizzly My RT: Grizzly And I plan to buy a drill press from Grizzly when I am ready for a floor stand DP. I do believe the extra $s in both the price and the shipping cost with Grizzly are worth it.

All the usual disclaimers. No connection to either HF or Grizzly other than satisfied customer.

CMcmillan
09-05-2012, 06:58 PM
Thanks for the replies so far everyone. And I did look into a fixed vertical bandsaw but the price difference is too much for me right now over just getting a 4x6. And it's actually very common 70-80 percent of knifemakers use the horiz/vert bandsaw just for that purpose so I would imagine it will be ok cutting vertically. I do agree I would rather have a fixed vertical but the $400 for the grizzly is pushing it.

I don't want to spend another $200 if the grizzly is the same thing as the harbor freight only with a different paint job/name, but it seems the quality is better from everyones response.
So with what has been said I think I'm going to fork out the extra cash to go with the grizzly. Will be placing my order probably on Monday.

JoeLee,
Would there be any sort of easy modification to remedy that guide problem? Maybe some kind of shield to stop the filings from entering that area?

Ries
09-05-2012, 08:47 PM
I am quite sure that there are at least fifty different factories making these. They are not all the same. I have seen size differences of up to 6" overall in the bow, weight differences of fifty pounds, completely different castings, and wildly different sizes and shapes of parts.
I have been buying the Jet 4x6's since about 1978, have completely worn out two of em, and have two in the shop working right now. So I have bought 4 of em in the last 30 years. I have done tens of thousands of cuts on them.
They are significantly better, right out of the box, than the Harbor Freight, with better bearings, bolts, switches, and parts.
Mine cut straight, the blades can be tensioned tighter, and you can sit on em without the saw collapsing.
I have a bigger Grizzly, a 7x10, and its been a POS since the day I bought it. I only drag it out for stuff to big to fit in any of my other saws.
I havent bought another Grizzly power tool since, although I still buy tooling, clamps, and the like from them.

All of the little saws are an incredible bargain, in terms of how cheap they are versus what they can do- a real Do-all is well over ten grand, and an Amada is closer to twenty. So, to me, the difference between $200 and $400 is pretty minor, compared to what you would spend for a real industrial saw.

Absolutely run bi-metal blades if you are going to be cutting stainless in the vertical mode- I like either Starretts or Lenox, variable pitch for the little saws. I cut literally tons of stainless, albeit mostly 304, in the vertical position on my little Jets, they work great for that.

CMcmillan
09-06-2012, 04:21 AM
I am quite sure that there are at least fifty different factories making these. They are not all the same. I have seen size differences of up to 6" overall in the bow, weight differences of fifty pounds, completely different castings, and wildly different sizes and shapes of parts.
I have been buying the Jet 4x6's since about 1978, have completely worn out two of em, and have two in the shop working right now. So I have bought 4 of em in the last 30 years. I have done tens of thousands of cuts on them.
They are significantly better, right out of the box, than the Harbor Freight, with better bearings, bolts, switches, and parts.
Mine cut straight, the blades can be tensioned tighter, and you can sit on em without the saw collapsing.
I have a bigger Grizzly, a 7x10, and its been a POS since the day I bought it. I only drag it out for stuff to big to fit in any of my other saws.
I havent bought another Grizzly power tool since, although I still buy tooling, clamps, and the like from them.

All of the little saws are an incredible bargain, in terms of how cheap they are versus what they can do- a real Do-all is well over ten grand, and an Amada is closer to twenty. So, to me, the difference between $200 and $400 is pretty minor, compared to what you would spend for a real industrial saw.

Absolutely run bi-metal blades if you are going to be cutting stainless in the vertical mode- I like either Starretts or Lenox, variable pitch for the little saws. I cut literally tons of stainless, albeit mostly 304, in the vertical position on my little Jets, they work great for that.

Well, you shyed me away from a Grizzly and most likely sold me on a Jet. I can't seem to find ANY of the 4x6 jets online where you can purchase though. Where did you purchase yours? With my luck they probably don't make them anymore.
And thanks for the reply, all of this information I've gotten on here helps immensly.

torchroadster
09-06-2012, 06:14 AM
I purchased and returned two 4x6 Harbor Freight saws. First one showed up with a cracked casting. Second one had misaligned bushings/casting holes at the pivot shaft.

I think Jet's saw in this class is a 5x6, not 4x6. http://www.amazon.com/Jet-414458-HVBS-56M-Horizontal-Vertical/dp/B00004T9KU

CMcmillan
09-06-2012, 06:35 AM
I purchased and returned two 4x6 Harbor Freight saws. First one showed up with a cracked casting. Second one had misaligned bushings/casting holes at the pivot shaft.

I think Jet's saw in this class is a 5x6, not 4x6. http://www.amazon.com/Jet-414458-HVBS-56M-Horizontal-Vertical/dp/B00004T9KU

That may be why I couldn't find it, thanks. My top budget is $400 and really no more past that, while I would have no problem spending an extra hundred for the jet, I can't right now. So would any of you suggest the enco?
http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INSRIT?PMAKA=505-6840

Or any other models? I have heard good on the grizzly, but ries didn't have a pleasant experience with them...and I just keep hearing more negatives on the harbor freight as I look into it more.

bosox
09-06-2012, 09:38 AM
Absolutely run bi-metal blades if you are going to be cutting stainless in the vertical mode- I like either Starretts or Lenox, variable pitch for the little saws. I cut literally tons of stainless, albeit mostly 304, in the vertical position on my little Jets, they work great for that.


Ries, I have a much cheaper source for bi metal blades. The cuts are superior! Maybe they’re the same with Starret or Lenox. But I always go for a wiser choice. Their price is 30% less than other brands. Plus more discounts on volume purchases. The brand of the blade is Haltbar. They say it’s German engineered and American made. Got them from this site: www.sawblade.com.

torchroadster
09-06-2012, 11:19 AM
. My top budget is $400 and really no more past that,

.

Have you considered used? Craigslist? After my HF experience I ended up with a good quality older Craftsman saw for $90.

Evan
09-06-2012, 11:25 AM
The Grizzly, on the other hand, I'm hearing is the same model, casting, same exact machine, so on and so forth,

I don't know how many times that has been said here but it isn't necessarily so. While there are many of those saws on the market there are major differences in the actual saws even though they may look similar. There are hundreds of such manufacturers in China and while they may copy each other's designs they sure don't make them the same. I have a Busy Bee 4x6 and it is excellent. The model sold by Princess Auto is total garbage. One thing I hear a lot here is that the motors suck. Not the one on my BB saw. It is oversize and runs cool even on very long cuts.

There are big differences in the stands too as well as the gearbox. You can't go by the pretty pictures in the catalogue or website, you have to actually look at it or take advice here on a specific model.

bosox
09-06-2012, 11:40 AM
I totally agree with Evan.

PaulT
09-06-2012, 12:41 PM
That may be why I couldn't find it, thanks. My top budget is $400 and really no more past that, while I would have no problem spending an extra hundred for the jet, I can't right now. So would any of you suggest the enco?
http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INSRIT?PMAKA=505-6840



My experience with buying chinese manufactured machines from Enco has been pretty positive, they appear to make an effort not to sell the bottom of the barrel versions lower quality control versions common to Harbor Freight. Plus if you hit them during a sale and free shipping period that will help you on price.

But keep in mind that whatever one you end up buying, these chinese machine tools are a crapshoot, get lucky and it will last you 20 years like mine. But sometimes even from the "better" suppliers, including both Jet and Grizzly, you get a lemon, if it has any problems right out of the box don't dink around with it, have them replace it.

I just remembered, on my 20 year old saw the first time I went to use it I tightened up the belt tension knob and about 1/3 of the plastic knob cracked off in my hand. I didn't expect much from the saw after that, but after that poor beginning it kicked rear and has continued to do so.

Whats also funny is the cracked off knob actually works a little better, the flat spot on the knob it created makes it easier to tighten.

Paul T.
www.springtest.com

kwoodhands
09-06-2012, 03:14 PM
For starters a 4x6 is the wrong saw if you intend to use it vertically. You need a bandsaw similar to a wood cutting bandsaw that runs much slower of course.
As far as the quality of the HF versus the Grizzly 4x6 , I have the HF saw. It cuts the stock square,now.Took me 5 days to get this piece of crap to cut square. If it wasn't such a pita to pack up I would have brought it back to HF store.I had to rework the entire casting where the saw pivots on the base.I through the guard out because it hit the table before the cut went thru.Adjusting the guard was fruitless,throwing it out was the answer.I won't rant about the blade because I expected to replace it anyhow with a bimetal blade.I only paid $159.00 + tax ,this was several years ago when it was on sale plus a 20% off coupon.
If I was to do it again ,I would buy the Grizzly or Enco machine.Morse makes good blades for these machines.
mike

RussZHC
09-06-2012, 03:41 PM
+1 on what Evan said, http://www.busybeetools.com/products/BANDSAW-METAL-4IN.-X-6IN.-1%7B47%7D3-HP-CSA-CRAFTEX.html
I bought based partially on his input during a previous thread.
Spent an hour or two getting it to track as I thought it should, spent $ on the Lennox Diemaster II, a drop or two of Walter Cool Cut when all teeth are fully into the cut...it just keeps going...mostly "mystery" metal, a lot somewhat rusty, some fairly gummy, a little really hard, solids and a fair bit of rectangular tube 1/8" wall and thinner. Sturdier stand.
All I basically do now is try and keep it clean and check the tension of the blade every so often. The as cut end needs only a very slight facing in the lathe to be flat enough for my purposes.

Edit: to add, I doubt I will ever use it vertically

PaulT
09-06-2012, 04:22 PM
I looked at the BusyBee saw link and it has a picture where you can zoom into segments by hovering over it with your mouse.

This brought back some memories, apparently some of these saws, like the BB one in the picture, now ship with formed sheet metal blade guides, versus the cast ones that were originally on these saws. I remember also seeing some comments where the sheet metal ones aren't as good as the cast ones.

So if you have your choice, I'd look for a version that uses the cast guides instead of the formed ones although this could be hard to determine without a pretty detailed picture of the saw.

Paul T.
www.springtest.com

mickeyf
09-07-2012, 12:18 AM
I got a HF 4x6 about 10 years ago, and have used it regularly since with no problems. No sand ( I checked after hearing the stories). I did make a new stand for it, eventually one higher than the one that came with it. That made a huge difference to my back, not to mention being able to use a support for long pieces - my roller support would not go low enough for the original. The motor does look pretty cheap, but it has gone all day long without failing yet.

I also would suggest that if you need a vertical saw, get a vertical saw. I geared down a woodworking bandsaw and used that successfully for a while. You might look into that. I even used one at woodworking speeds, limiting myself to aluminum and probably getting shorter blade life. The 4x6 designs are ok for occasional vertical cutting, but I suspect you won't be very happy doing any amount of it.

mickeyf
09-07-2012, 12:43 AM
I just remembered that on Frank Ford's website he has what looks an awful lot like a plain ol' Delta woodworker's band saw with pictures of it doing quite a nice job, thank you very much, of cutting metal.

http://www.frets.com/HomeShopTech/Tooling/BandSawFeed/bandsawfeed.html

CMcmillan
09-07-2012, 02:52 AM
First off this thread has helped a lot in aiding my decision and I appreciate what this community has to offer, thank you.
Secondly, I have it down between the enco,
http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INSRIT?PMAKA=505-6840

And the busy bee craftex,
http://www.busybeetools.com/products/BANDSAW-METAL-4IN.-X-6IN.-1%7B47%7D3-HP-CSA-CRAFTEX.html

The enco has a promotion currently running that offers free shipping on $99 on up which would be nice. The busy bee has a TBD shipping charge which I assume will be around $100 or so. Any further comments between these two saws is appreciated. I have been looking for a while and am about to make the leap, and want to make the best decision possible. Enco is a bit cheaper, the craftex looks nicer, but function over cosmetics..

As I've said I would rather have a fixed vertical bandsaw but the cost is a lot more and what 90% of knifemakers use is the 4x6's so that should be fine.

Evan
09-07-2012, 11:45 AM
The two saws look pretty equivalent. It may come down to after sale support. I have bought a lot from BB over the years and have on a few occasions required after sales help. BB has always been good. They have been in business for many years and are run by two of the Balolia brothers. The third brother runs Grizzly tools in the US who also seem to have a decent reputation. I haven't dealt with Enco at all so can't offer any advice there.

It would help if you updated your profile with an approximate location.

mako_cc
09-07-2012, 12:02 PM
Sorry that this is my first post here, but I really wanted to provide a warning for you on the Enco free shipping. I purchased a 4x6 saw from Enco (whch I have been happy with) during one of their free shipping deals and found that this item didn't qualify. It weighed too much to be shipped by UPS (I believe it was 125 lbs.) and so had to be shipped by freight. Also, when you order, make sure you request that the freight company call you prior to delivery so you know when its coming. They tried to slap me with a $60 re-delivery charge when I wasn't home the first time.

A quick call to Enco should be able to answer the free shipping question for you as my experience was several years ago.

Oh and hello everyone. Thanks for the great site. Lots of excellent information here.

-Chad

Ries
09-07-2012, 06:30 PM
Busy Bee is Canadian. They dont have any stores in the USA, and while they will ship to the US, my guess is that it would be pretty expensive. They tell you to call for shipping prices for anything over 30kg.
The two brothers split up North America- one brother owns Grizzly, and gets to sell to the USA, the other brother owns Busy Bee, and sells to Canada.
They dont necessarily order or stock the same things, or, in some cases, even buy from the same factories, even though they, themselves, are related, the companies are entirely freestanding.

CMcmillan
09-08-2012, 04:58 AM
I shot Enco a call and the promotion for free shipping does NOT cover their heavy shipments, and it is $79 to ship, $269 for the saw.
I am waiting on an email back from busy bee with a shipping quote, and if it isn't over $100 I think I'm going to roll with them. If shipping is more than that I will probably just get the Enco.

When they come to deliver the bandsaw in the morning they want you to unload it from the truck yourself, my son is home when they would deliver but he will not be able to lift it by himself and I hear they charge reshipping fees if you miss it/can't unload it.
Any suggestions on this? Never had any heavy machinery shipped, I work until 5pm.

bosox
09-10-2012, 11:34 AM
I guess you will need to rent a heavy equipment lifter like a fork lift for it. I don’t know how much it will cost. Maybe someone can provide the precise rate per hour.

Ries
09-10-2012, 12:33 PM
A forklift? for a saw that weighs 125lbs? Really?

Look, I totally understand that many people have health issues that preclude lifting heavy things, but 125lbs, or even 150lbs with packing, is just not that heavy.

To me, "heavy machinery" means a ton and over.

This itty bitty bandsaw is easily lowered to the ground by one guy like me, who is far from being Arnold Schwartznegger.
Assuming the delivery truck does not have a liftgate, you could take a couple of 8 foot 2x4's, and slide the saw down them to the ground. You could back your pickup up to the open back of the delivery truck, and the height difference is then very small, and you lift one end only of the saw, put it down on the bed of the truck, then lift the other end.
You can easily move a saw like this with a handtruck or a 4 wheel dolly or a wheelbarrow, or even a little red wagon. Got a roof rack on your subaru? slide the saw from the truck bed to the top of a car, then drive the car into a garage, and use a rope to lower the saw to the ground.

This isnt a very big thing- 2 adults can easily carry 125lbs, even if one of them is a small woman- I know, I have drafted my wife on numerous occasions.

Worst comes to worst, slip the truck driver ten bucks or a six pack, and he will wait while you open the box in his truck and hand carry the parts in- the main assembly is less than a hundred pounds, especially if you take the motor off.

You do not need a forklift to unload this saw.

bosox
09-10-2012, 02:25 PM
I didn’t get the weight there. That’s why I came up with the fork lift idea.

The Artful Bodger
09-10-2012, 05:41 PM
Sounds like you need to buy an engine crane! I dont have one but everyone else does! ;)

Seriously, I was careful to have a strong lintel across my garage door which I fitted a ring to. It is very useful for loading/unloading moderately heavy things from the backs of trucks, trailers etc, using just a chain hoist.

CMcmillan
09-11-2012, 03:27 PM
Well shipping on the busy bee is $700, yes you read that right! So enco it is.
And a fork lift for something this small is going overboard, agreed. But my son being the one at home I doubt could lift it alone. Thanks

bosox
09-12-2012, 10:42 AM
You can ask one of your neighbors to help him lift the machine. Or call your son’s friend and let him hangout in your house so when the shipment arrives, they can help each other lifting the machine.

customcutter
09-13-2012, 08:21 PM
No insight on the saw you chose, however make sure you rig some way of lubricating the blade. Also make sure that the teeth on the blade are fine enough that you always have at least 3 teeth in the cut, IIRC. I'm sure someone will correct me if I'm wrong. I've cut a lot of ATS34, and sheared a lot of teeth off.

good luck,
Ken

bosox
09-14-2012, 09:46 AM
You’re right, Ken! It is recommended to have a minimum 3 teeth in a cut. If there are too few teeth in the cut, the teeth can straddle the work piece, which can cause tooth strippage. And a maximum of 24 teeth in the cut. Too many teeth in the cut may cause the gullets to “overload” because there is not enough gullet capacity to hold all the chips. This can cause blade bouncing and can cause tooth strippage.

I have learned this from my band saw blade supplier. Someone from their department sent me learning modules that are very useful to metal cutting. If you’re interested, I can send them to you through email. Please PM me if you like.

Mr Fixit
09-15-2012, 12:30 AM
Cmcmillian,
You could also contact the shipper and have them hold the saw at their warehouse and then you could go with your son and get it.
Just one more idea, thinking outside of the box.

Chris
Mr fixit in the family

CMcmillan
09-15-2012, 01:06 AM
Cmcmillian,
You could also contact the shipper and have them hold the saw at their warehouse and then you could go with your son and get it.
Just one more idea, thinking outside of the box.

Chris
Mr fixit in the family

And that's what we did :). Thanks all

outback
09-15-2012, 05:32 AM
I bought a HF 4x6 saw in 2000. It has worked fine right out of the box, daily use for 12 years. Truthfully, I cannot believe it still runs. The saw blade guides are original.

Here is one upgrade I did.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v30/jglass/Automation%20Projects/barfeeder6.jpg

Below is the simplest, handyest saw ever made from pure junk.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v30/jglass/BANDSAW2.jpg http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v30/jglass/BANDSAW1.jpg

I made this saw 13 years ago and it get daily use. I rescued a 1/4hp 90VDC gearmotor from the dumpster at work. The bandsaw drive wheel is mounted directly to the gearmotor shaft. The 1" aluminum plate the motor is mounted to is also a mounting surface for the table.

After that I welded up a simple column and over arm for the upper drive wheel.

Eventually I lowered the upper drive wheel so a standard length saw blade could be use.
I think it uses the same blade as the 4x6 saw.

Jim