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View Full Version : How do you deal with dust in the shop?



customcutter
09-06-2012, 09:20 PM
OK, I've got 2 new (to me) pieces of equipment that I'm putting in my garage. A 14X40 lathe and a 3hp mill. Both are in excellent shape. I don't want to ruin them by having dust all over them, and making grinding paste every time I use them.

My garage door gets opened 2-4 times a day, and everything stays covered in dust. Years ago I built a smaller 8' X 8' area in one corner where I put all of my grinders to isolate that dust. However, the dust I'm talking about blows in from outside.

How do you deal with it???

thanks,
Ken

RussZHC
09-06-2012, 09:25 PM
Cloth covers and good habits (trying anyway, if there is welding or grinding going on, the cover goes back on)...from my experience, unless that corner is "sealed" while it will help, grind dust gets everywhere even where you think it would never be; clean often...

sasquatch
09-06-2012, 09:58 PM
Ken, is this a walk in man door or roll up garage doors?

KiddZimaHater
09-06-2012, 11:08 PM
Dust?
You're worried about DUST?
Honestly, I wouldn't worry about it. Wipe your machines down at the end of the day, and I'm sure they'll out live you.

oldtiffie
09-07-2012, 02:54 AM
I suppose you could have them in a dust-proof room with higher than atmospheric pressured airlock/s and air-conditioning with HEPA filters. And don't forget clean clothes, boots etc. - changed and disposed of daily.

But there isn't much point in making a space dust-proof unlees the temperature and humidity are stable to reduce precititation and rust.

Otherwise just take reasonable care.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HEPA

http://www.google.com.au/#hl=en&gs_nf=1&pq=blanchard%20grinder&cp=5&gs_id=m&xhr=t&q=hepa+filter&pf=p&rlz=1R2IRFC_enAU360&sclient=psy-ab&oq=hepa+&gs_l=&pbx=1&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.r_qf.&fp=35e898c8395b3e86&biw=1920&bih=851

big job
09-07-2012, 05:54 AM
Good question, my biggest problem is dust in the house shop is cleaner, I guess dust
must grow! windows are closed

customcutter
09-07-2012, 06:09 AM
Dust?
You're worried about DUST?
Honestly, I wouldn't worry about it. Wipe your machines down at the end of the day, and I'm sure they'll out live you.

Yes, I'm worried about dust. I won't be operating my equipment daily or even weekly. There's a large roll up garage door, and dust (sand/silica) gets all over everything in my garage.

Also I think it would be better to wipe everything down before starting rather than after.

thanks,
Ken

Rosco-P
09-07-2012, 06:53 AM
Cloth covers and good habits (trying anyway, if there is welding or grinding going on, the cover goes back on)...from my experience, unless that corner is "sealed" while it will help, grind dust gets everywhere even where you think it would never be; clean often...

Is that 8x8 corner sealed and ventilated to the ouside? Do you have some form of dust collection/extraction your grinders?

Frank Ford
09-07-2012, 10:22 AM
I do a fair bit of woodworking and metal grinding in my small crowded shop, around and with my mill and lathe. So, I've developed a series of 1/6" thick neoprene shrouds that cover all the ways and tables. I even have separate hanging rubber covers over all the DRO scales, in addition to the stock metal ones. After milling wood for an hour, I don't get any dust on the ways at all. I blow it off with compressed air, suck up with shop vac. It took a little while to get used to keeping the sheets on (magnets hold some of them in place) but by now it seems like the machine is naked and vulnerable without 'em.

Here's a small shot of my mill in its normal outfit:

http://www.frets.com/HomeShopTech/Magnets/RubberSheet/millshroud.jpg

bborr01
09-07-2012, 10:52 AM
I have seen some hanging dust collectors on craigslist at a reasonable price and have wondered how well they work.

I noticed that when I was running my equipment for 4 weeks straight they generated a lot of dust from cutting metal.

Does anyone use one of these dust collectors? I think they are marketed more for woodworking but can't see why they wouldn't
work fine in a metalworking shop.

Brian

lakeside53
09-07-2012, 11:03 AM
Wood dust is very light. Even sand "dust" will be somewhat heavy. I've used the recirculating dust extractors for a wood shop; wouldn't bother for metal.

customcutter
09-07-2012, 05:48 PM
I do a fair bit of woodworking and metal grinding in my small crowded shop, around and with my mill and lathe. So, I've developed a series of 1/6" thick neoprene shrouds that cover all the ways and tables. I even have separate hanging rubber covers over all the DRO scales, in addition to the stock metal ones. After milling wood for an hour, I don't get any dust on the ways at all. I blow it off with compressed air, suck up with shop vac. It took a little while to get used to keeping the sheets on (magnets hold some of them in place) but by now it seems like the machine is naked and vulnerable without 'em.

Here's a small shot of my mill in its normal outfit:

http://www.frets.com/HomeShopTech/Magnets/RubberSheet/millshroud.jpg

Frank:

thanks, that's more what I was thinking. I don't know if there is room to hang some plastic from the ceiling due to the overhead garage door. But covering the ways and then the entire machine may be the way to go.

thanks,
Ken

ScubaSteve
09-07-2012, 07:09 PM
I try to do my woodworking at the entrance of the garage with the door open. Then, I turn a large box fan on high and keep it behind me. Sort of a basic positive pressure system; it doesn't stop everything, but I can actually see all the dust moving out of the garage when I make a cut. Then, I use compressed air to blow off my machines before I roll them back into their place of storage. As for machine tools, I second a cover....as well as cleaning up your chips after working.

This dude builds a nice air cleaner unit for his shop....I've been thinking about doing it myself:
http://youtu.be/5cyyfq-TfwE


I think it'd be pretty awesome to blow some compressed air around the shop to get the dust up, then turn the air cleaner on for 15 minutes with a self shutoff. Beats the hell out of wiping stuff down.

jhe.1973
09-07-2012, 07:17 PM
I do a fair bit of woodworking and metal grinding in my small crowded shop, around and with my mill and lathe. So, I've developed a series of 1/6" thick neoprene shrouds that cover all the ways and tables. I even have separate hanging rubber covers over all the DRO scales, in addition to the stock metal ones. After milling wood for an hour, I don't get any dust on the ways at all. I blow it off with compressed air, suck up with shop vac. It took a little while to get used to keeping the sheets on (magnets hold some of them in place) but by now it seems like the machine is naked and vulnerable without 'em.



Hi Everyone,

This isn't a criticism of covering a machine, just a detail to be aware of.

Any non-breathable cover to a surface while stopping dust also stops ventilation. Depending on your environment, the cover may trap humidity leading to rust.

I'd first start with a couple of sheets and try a non-breathable cover on something less valuable.

In Arizona every breeze brings dust (fine sand) but at least we have super low humidity so condensation isn't an issue. I cover several of my more important machines/tools and wipe everything anyway before using them.

TRX
09-07-2012, 07:43 PM
I use old bed sheets. They are free, and don't trap moisture underneath like plastic will.

oldtiffie
09-07-2012, 08:15 PM
My 22' x 36' shop with 22' x 24' covered car-port and gravel drive-way for welding and grinding (with roller dood closed).

http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/aa294/oldtiffie/Shop_and_tools/Shed-ext1.jpg

Inside:
http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/aa294/oldtiffie/Shop_and_tools/Shed-ext2.jpg

Covered with coarse-weave painters drop-sheets (no condensation):
http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/aa294/oldtiffie/Shop_and_tools/Machine_Covers1.jpg

customcutter
09-07-2012, 09:53 PM
I guess I'll try some old sheets first. Hadn't really considered the effects of plastic tarps and the high humidity here in Fl.

thanks,
Ken

uncle pete
09-07-2012, 10:15 PM
Ken,
A good question and one I've had to deal with, and gladly don't have to right now. That air born crud is going to be a time consuming PITA. My shop is only 120 sq. ft. so I've made a point of not doing any grinding that's at least not done on a wet wheel inside it. I'll pack a dry grinder outside even at -20 to do that dry grinding.

Your also dealing with humidity issues I don't have to. Cotton sheets, wool blankets do work, but they still allow the fine crap to filter thru over time. A impermeable plastic sheet keeps the crud off mostly, but they will sweat from temperature changes, so the rust problem is just as bad as the air born grinding paste. Unsealed concrete floors, unpaved driveways don't help. A cotton sheet, wool blanket over the equipment with a cover of 6 mil plastic to keep all that dust filtering thru over time would help. A light bulb set up SAFELY and running 24/7 will help with the condensation. Greasy, oily equipment is just going to suck that air born dust right out of the air. You have a high maintenance issue, even with decent machine tool covers that don't sweat? Your still going to be applying and wiping off almost unused lube.

Other than that? A well sealed and separate room is about the only other way to go. Even air convection currents are going to drag up that equipment eating dust under the covers unless you can seal most of it off at the bottom.

I can't stress enough just how easy it would be to start a fire with a light bulb under the cover though. For what its worth, I don't envy you.

Pete

fjk
09-10-2012, 01:12 PM
, the dust I'm talking about blows in from outside.


If it blows in from outside when the door is open, don't open the door so much :-/
Add a regular door, so you don't need to open the garage doors as often
Add some kind of "airlock" or vestibule, so you're never directly open to the outside
Add some of those hanging plastic curtains that are often in warehouses and cold rooms (they're like 6"
wide strips of heavy gauge clear vinyl and hang from the ceiling).

Covering just machines seems like only part of the answer, once dust gets in it's everywhere
and can f...-up everything.
so it seems to me that the broader the solution, the better.

Frank

PeteM
09-10-2012, 05:31 PM
A couple points:

- The better you seal up the area, well, the better. Curtains if you must. Real walls and a ceiling if you can.

- You don't want the usual sort of dust collector, which pulls air out of the shop. Best would be an air filter on a fan putting a slight positive pressure into the shop if you still have significant leaks or need to have an open door for some reason.

bosox
09-12-2012, 10:56 AM
Dusts? Not a single dust survives when these are in my hands:

http://i21.geccdn.net/site/images/n-picgroup/75212.jpg http://shellyreviews.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/10/vacuum.jpg http://tipnut.com/projectpics2/broom.jpg

JRouche
09-12-2012, 11:31 AM
Hey Ken. I have an attached garage shop. Its got 3 lathes, three mills, a shaper, drill press, heat treat and hardness equipment, some wood working stuff, grinding, sanding and sharpening machines and welding equipment.

I may go months and not touch some of the stuff. It all stays lubricated and WOULD be coated in dust, grit and lube if not cleaned regularly. And Im NOT cleaning it if Im not using it, I have better things to do than clean idle machinery.

So I bought a dozen high quality mover's blankets and cover all the tooling cept for the welders and drill press. I can go months never seeing a machine then need to use it and shes clean and ready to go. I always put the machines "down" cleaned and lubed.

Works for me!!!!! JR

wb2vsj
09-12-2012, 12:17 PM
How about positive pressure? Have a filtered fan blow outside air into the shop (preferably from the back towards the front) when the door is opened. Granted, it would take a big arse fan to keep everything out when the door opens.