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enginuity
09-11-2012, 05:47 PM
Just had to cut 2 blanks out of 1 1/2" D2 tool steel by hand.

Wasn't too bad, but my arm was feeling it near the end. This particular D2 did cut a little harder than usual.

Which made me wonder, what's the biggest piece of solid bar you cut through with a hand hack saw?

I think mine is 3 inch solid 1020 steel.

The nice thing about using the hand hack saw is you don't have to go to the gym.

mrriggs
09-11-2012, 07:58 PM
I did a 2-5/8" stainless steel bar a couple weeks ago.

http://www.gofastforless.com/junk/COdrill05.jpg

sasquatch
09-11-2012, 08:41 PM
Man,, you guys got WAY MORE energy than i have!! Lol

cameron
09-11-2012, 08:46 PM
I didn't measure the diameter, but I had to climb up a ladder to start the cut.

sasquatch
09-11-2012, 08:49 PM
I heard of guys having to weld two hacksaw blades together to get enough width! Lol

danlb
09-11-2012, 08:59 PM
$75 for a portable bandsaw at Harbor Freight. Great purchase. I used it to cut the 2 1/2 inch neck off a chuck backplate. It only took 10 minutes or so.

Dan

Ian B
09-12-2012, 02:37 AM
What's a hacksaw?

Ian

Evan
09-12-2012, 03:32 AM
Did you think to use cutting oil? It will cut twice as fast and the blade lasts a lot longer.

John Stevenson
09-12-2012, 03:45 AM
6" x 4" Quite a few as well :o

When I was an apprentice, this was punishment routine. You had to say in at break times and dinner times and saw a slice off, didn't matter how long, just hacksaw a slice off. Punishment was over when you had sawn a slice.

First time I got this [ story another time ] I though hey ho soon be outta here so 5 swipes of the blade,quick twist and snap.
Go to the stores hatch where the apprentice master had their break and " Please sir the blade has broken"

Hand came out with a new Eclipse blade.

Another 10 swipes and watcha know ? Another broken blade. same hand came out with another blade.

This went on about 4 - 5 times and I thought they'll get fed up of this and I'm away free.
"Sir this blade has broken as well !" Hand came out with a full packet of 100 blades.

"Come back when you have broken all them !"

It was at this point I realise that it's impossible to buck the system, they would have thrown as many blades as it took to get this slice cut, cost didn't come into it, it was all about attitude

One spin off I can saw straight !! ;)

oldtiffie
09-12-2012, 03:47 AM
I gave that up 50+ years ago - and there is no going back - ever!!

That's what my band saw or my metal suppliers "cold saw" and large automated band-saw are for.

Cost is minimal and I pass his premises 4Km (~ 2.5 miles) away at least every three days or so.

http://www.machineryhouse.com.au/Metal-Cutting-Coldsaws-Ferrous

Peter N
09-12-2012, 04:17 AM
Those of us who were taught to hacksaw remember that the trick is not to 'push' it too much, and let the blade do the work.
Still tiring on a large cut of course, but not nearly so much as those who put all their weight into the stroke. Makes quite a difference.
Mind you, anything over 1" now goes straight on the bandsaw.

small.planes
09-12-2012, 04:26 AM
6"x4", but I cheated, it was a piece of box section ;)
For big stuff now I use :

http://i306.photobucket.com/albums/nn274/small_planes/SIP%20Jig%20Borer/DSC_9371.jpg

Found it in the back of some blokes van...

I find that on a junior hacksaw putting the blade in backwards, so it cuts on the pull stroke seems to work better, I think its because the frames are 'flimsy' so they dont hold tension very well.

Dave

John Stevenson
09-12-2012, 05:42 AM
6"x4", but I cheated, it was a piece of box section ;)
For big stuff now I use :

http://i306.photobucket.com/albums/nn274/small_planes/SIP%20Jig%20Borer/DSC_9371.jpg

Found it in the back of some blokes van...

I find that on a junior hacksaw putting the blade in backwards, so it cuts on the pull stroke seems to work better, I think its because the frames are 'flimsy' so they dont hold tension very well.

Dave


I see you have polished it since I threw it out the back of the Donald. :D
+1 on the junior saws

willmac
09-12-2012, 06:23 AM
There are times when the typical bandsaw just won't cut it. (you saw that one coming:D).
Really there are times when you are cutting out awkward shapes and there is no sensible way to get it clamped in the bandsaw vice. By the time you have messed about trying to bodge together bits of angle and extra clamps, you can have it done with a hacksaw and a decent blade. A bit of exercise is good for you.

Alistair Hosie
09-12-2012, 06:27 AM
I could never do that now hence I have a nice qualters and smith hacksaw. It takes for that steel about six minutes who cares when you're having a break watching the work get done. :DAlistair

Ian B
09-12-2012, 06:30 AM
Nice to see a power hacksaw being used, as most people seem to go for horizontal bandsaws these days. Given that I presently have neither but need something with about an 8" x 4" capacity, any thoughts on the pros and cons of each type? Speed isn't an issue, as I can set the saw cutting and then go & do something else. Relative cost of consumables? Accuracy of the cut? I suppose to give an 8" length of cut, a power hacksaw would need something like an 18" blade.

Ian

small.planes
09-12-2012, 07:05 AM
I see you have polished it since I threw it out the back of the Donald. :D

*AND* fitted a new (old) Motor...
one day I might actually get all the old cuttings out of the vice area as well. (steady now ;) )

Ian,

I cant really coment on hacksaw vs bandsaw, but this one cuts straight and square, blades should last a long time.
This one will cut 7 - 7 1/2" front to back on a 14" blade. 8x4 cutting the other way, so 8" is up should be simple I think.

One day Ill get round to fixing it properly, so that it shuts off when the cuts done, for now I threw an old drill press motor at it to get it running, so you do have to supervise it a little, as it just keeps running, and would probably break something if it tried to saw to far down.

Dave

cameron
09-12-2012, 07:47 AM
Can someone kindly explain to me what it is that people in the UK use junior hacksaws for? I have one, and i don't know why I haven't thrown it out. If I can't get a 10" or 12" hacksaw to the cut, I'll use a decent blade in a pad saw before I'll use that *%^#@ thing.

Dr Stan
09-12-2012, 07:57 AM
Nice to see a power hacksaw being used, as most people seem to go for horizontal bandsaws these days. Given that I presently have neither but need something with about an 8" x 4" capacity, any thoughts on the pros and cons of each type? Speed isn't an issue, as I can set the saw cutting and then go & do something else. Relative cost of consumables? Accuracy of the cut? I suppose to give an 8" length of cut, a power hacksaw would need something like an 18" blade.

Ian

Speed followed closely by accuracy are the two primary benefits of a bandsaw V hacksaw. Since they have fallen out of favor it can be some what problematic to find power hacksaw blades.

boslab
09-12-2012, 08:03 AM
6" x 4" Quite a few as well :o

When I was an apprentice, this was punishment routine. You had to say in at break times and dinner times and saw a slice off, didn't matter how long, just hacksaw a slice off. Punishment was over when you had sawn a slice.

First time I got this [ story another time ] I though hey ho soon be outta here so 5 swipes of the blade,quick twist and snap.
Go to the stores hatch where the apprentice master had their break and " Please sir the blade has broken"

Hand came out with a new Eclipse blade.

Another 10 swipes and watcha know ? Another broken blade. same hand came out with another blade.

This went on about 4 - 5 times and I thought they'll get fed up of this and I'm away free.
"Sir this blade has broken as well !" Hand came out with a full packet of 100 blades.

"Come back when you have broken all them !"

It was at this point I realise that it's impossible to buck the system, they would have thrown as many blades as it took to get this slice cut, cost didn't come into it, it was all about attitude

One spin off I can saw straight !! ;)
In the UK metalworking was considered a punishment i think, we had to make a 3" cube with hacksaw file and scraper, it took about a month to do and when you finished you got to do another with a dovetail slot then another with a tounge and they had to fit, it was torture blunt files crappy blades and sweat, no wonder manufacturing left the country!
mark

rohart
09-13-2012, 10:31 PM
Cameron : I won't use a standard hacksaw on anything smaller than 3/32" or so. Try shortening a 4mm screw. A small and lighter saw, with nice fine teeth is just the ticket.

Of course, you could say I should be using a jeweller's saw, with the blade mounted in pull mode, but that can be too delicate sometimes.

oldtiffie
09-13-2012, 10:59 PM
I've had to do my share of that sadistic useless boring as sh*t and frustrating time-wasting apprentice/trainee hack-sawing and filing crap.

If it were pre-finished with minimal work needed to complete it I could see a lot of good in it - especially if "marking out" and an introduction to calipers and micrometers were included.

A lot of it was done "because the instructor and everybody else of that era and before had to do it" which is no justification at all.

It was no wonder a lot of very good apprentices got out of "fitting" and onto "machining" as quick as they could.

A 1mm thick cut-off disk works wonders as well for smaller stuff.

J. R. Williams
09-13-2012, 11:41 PM
I remember cutting some 12" heavy wall pipe with a two man saw located deep in a ditch under the hot summer sun. I was making the big sum of about $2.25 per hour.

EddyCurr
09-14-2012, 01:10 AM
A month ago I wrote about this portable Milwaukee coming home with me:
Portable Bandsaw (http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/threads/55461-Portable-Bandsaw)

http://www.slalom4me.com/imaged_a01/jpg/other/tools/power/2012.08.09_MilwaukeeSaw_01.jpg

Sometimes physical constraints place limitations on what can be cut and
how it can be cut, but I'll never willingly choose a hacksaw again.

After using the powered saw on the job I bought it for and putting it away,
a little task came up a few days later. "Here, no need to pull out the BS.
Just pop a fresh blade in the hacksaw and have at it." Well, after several
minutes of that, out came the bandsaw - zip, done, and back in the case.

What's more. I am surprised by the bandsaw blade life and resilience. I
bought several spares for the initial job. Despite tweaking the blade more
than once in my inexperience, it stood up to that abuse and continues to
hold an edge.

.

jr45acp
09-14-2012, 08:18 AM
With all the discussion of hack saws, would anyone care to recommend a decent hack saw frame that would be available in the US? I've got a couple of frames, but for the life of me, I can't ever get even close to a straight cut with them. I've considered a portaband, etc., but I can't justify the dollar expenditure for the amount of sawing I do.

davidh
09-14-2012, 08:55 AM
three portabands (1old porter cable and 2 milwaukees), an old craftsman horiz / vertical band saw, plazma burner, stee;lmax cold cut saw and 1/32" cut of wheels in a die grinder. . . i buried my hack saw some time ago and have not seen it since. . . .never missed it.

caveBob
09-14-2012, 09:21 AM
jr45acp

With all the discussion of hack saws, would anyone care to recommend a decent hack saw frame that would be available in the US? I've got a couple of frames, but for the life of me, I can't ever get even close to a straight cut with them. I've considered a portaband, etc., but I can't justify the dollar expenditure for the amount of sawing I do.


Picked up one of these last winter on sale, something like $20 @ my local Home Depot:

Stanley FatMax 12 in. High-Tension Hacksaw @ Home Depot - $25.99
http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1v/R-100287738/h_d2/ProductDisplay?catalogId=100&langId=-1&keyword=Stanley+FatMax+12+in.+High-Tension+Hacksaw&storeId=10051#.UFMy8GIidmU

You can tension it up pretty easily, has worked fine and would buy it again... but, as you've mentioned about "all this discussion", I reeeealy think getting a portable bandsaw is inevitable. (so says my arms after cutting a fair bit of 1/2" and 5/8" thick plate recently):)

...forgot to mention a couple things that help with straight cuts/minimizing waste/cleanup... extend your pointer finger, keeping it parallel with the blade when cutting. Using your periphery vision sight against a square or something upright in the background, 90* to the cut. If cutting square/rectangular or round stock... only cut say 1/4 deep, rotate your work 90*, cut 1/4 deep, rotate, rinse and repeat two more times for all 4 sides... then cut all the way through. When starting the cuts, only use the weight of the saw (no downwards pressure) until you've started the initial groove, then... apply a little more down pressure as you proceed, mainly letting the teeth do the work for you... finesse over force here is rewarded.

hth...

cameron
09-14-2012, 10:03 AM
Cameron : I won't use a standard hacksaw on anything smaller than 3/32" or so. Try shortening a 4mm screw. A small and lighter saw, with nice fine teeth is just the ticket.

Of course, you could say I should be using a jeweller's saw, with the blade mounted in pull mode, but that can be too delicate sometimes.

If I had to shorten that screw, I'd add a 4mm tapped hole to the plate with the tapped holes hanging beside my vise. Screw it in, knock off the projecting end with a 32 tpi hacksaw, file flat, back out.

Ian B
09-14-2012, 11:45 AM
John B,

These are pretty good: http://www.ebay.com/itm/Irwin-10504407-I125-Hacksaw-Frame-/350593662102?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item51a102bc96

I have one, nice, solid frame, easy to tension the blade, maybe even to destruction!

Ian

customcutter
09-14-2012, 09:50 PM
Everything I wanted to know about "hacksawing" I learned from watching the (cough) "gunsmithing" shows on Discovery Channel. NOT

kd4gij
09-15-2012, 01:04 AM
What's this hacksaw you speak of:confused:. If it has a handle then it aint in my shop.:D

John Stevenson
09-15-2012, 03:38 AM
Lennox make some nice ones, should think they are available stateside as lennox is a US company

jackary
09-15-2012, 05:45 AM
I mounted a blunt hacksaw blade in a piece of 3/4" pipe split along its length put it in the lathe and sharpened the teeth with a Dremel with an abrasive disc on the toolpost. Set the lathe to cut 18 tpi to suit the blade pitch and made a couple of passes. Blades cut much better and straighter than paint filled teeth on new blades
Alan

Bill736
09-15-2012, 08:40 PM
Speaking of hacksawing, my worst shop injury happened when the hacksaw somehow slipped off of the 2x2 inch angle iron, and cut into the index finger of my other hand. While I was standing there holding a piece of paper towel over the cut to control the bleeding, the phone rang. It was my wife, with the message " be careful". That was downright spooky .

sasquatch
09-15-2012, 09:00 PM
Friends of mine on a volunteer fire dept have a member there that is a real know it all guy!!

One night they were working there doing some maintanence, and "Know it all" had to cut a piece with the hacksaw.
So he shows up at the vise with the hacksaw, with two blades in it, one blade facing forward, the other facing backwards!
His explanation was it cut faster this way as it cut both on the forward stroke, AND the back stroke!!
He worked up a real sweat demonstrating this to the crew, as the teeth kept clogging up. Lol

LKeithR
09-15-2012, 09:52 PM
I gave that up 50+ years ago - and there is no going back - ever!!

That's what my band saw or my metal suppliers "cold saw" and large automated band-saw are for.

Cost is minimal and I pass his premises 4Km (~ 2.5 miles) away at least every three days or so.

http://www.machineryhouse.com.au/Metal-Cutting-Coldsaws-Ferrous

I agree completely! Hand hacksaw = "waste of time". Period!

John Stevenson
09-16-2012, 05:46 AM
I agree completely! Hand hacksaw = "waste of time". Period!

Not always, depends on the situation.
The other day had a pump in where everything had seized up, there were two 'windows' in the casting where the shaft was visible and threading a blade thru and sawing the shaft meant I was then able to press the two bearings out in different directions as per the design.
Power saw, angle grinder etc were nay able to get in this space.

If it's single cuts and under an inch then I reach for the hacksaw, multiple cuts and bigger go on the power saw.
What you have to remember is machining is quite sedentary and it's all too easy to fall into the "lets use a machine for this "

oldtiffie
09-16-2012, 06:43 AM
Where a hack-saw is the best option, by all means use it, but otherwise use something else/better if available.

LKeithR
09-16-2012, 11:55 AM
...The other day had a pump in where everything had seized up, there were two 'windows' in the casting where the shaft was visible and threading a blade thru and sawing the shaft meant I was then able to press the two bearings out in different directions as per the design.
Power saw, angle grinder etc were nay able to get in this space.

Definitely a situation where a hacksaw would be the only way to do the job. Doesn't happen very often, though.


If it's single cuts and under an inch then I reach for the hacksaw, multiple cuts and bigger go on the power saw.
What you have to remember is machining is quite sedentary and it's all too easy to fall into the "lets use a machine for this "

Most everything goes in the saw. For smaller pieces, especially awkward shaped ones, I'll often clamp it up in the vise and then take a zip-cutter to it. Way faster than a hacksaw. I'm in business to make money and my machines allow me to do things faster and more efficiently...

RussZHC
09-16-2012, 10:15 PM
Cutting 3" solid round a couple of times for two afternoons in a row was the final push to get the bandsaw.

However
If it's single cuts and under an inch then I reach for the hacksaw, multiple cuts and bigger go on the power saw. I still make use of it as I am more concerned on occasion of ripping teeth off a good bandsaw blade cutting one or two pieces of thinner material than I am of a bit of fatigue in the forearms plus in a small shop by the time I pull the saw out from its storage place, run an electrical cord, I would be done.

vpt
09-16-2012, 10:23 PM
I always hated hacksawing anything! I dreaded doing an exhaust years ago. Between only having a hacksaw and hand wood saw years ago I have done plenty enough back and forth arm motions to last a lifetime.