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CMcmillan
09-27-2012, 09:59 PM
I'm about to flush out my 1980's 4x6 metal cutting bandsaws gearbox and am not sure which type of oil to re-fill the gearbox with. It does have a brass drive gear so I can't use any of the higher level oils from my understanding to prevent corrosion.

I asked the manufacture what they recommended and they said to use this,
http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INSRIT?PARTPG=INLMKD&PMPXNO=5830124&PMAKA=325-5922

Would this stuff do the job? I've learned to not always listen to the manufacture..
Thanks

v860rich
09-27-2012, 10:20 PM
I have a Wilton from the 70's and I've only added lube a couple times. I used 90 wt. gear lube and have never had a problem.
The only times I have had to add oil is when the shaft came loose and moved causing a leak.

THANX RICH

flathead4
09-27-2012, 10:22 PM
I use this gear oil in my saw and have had no problems:

http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INSRIT?PARTPG=INLMKD&PMPXNO=5830206&PMAKA=325-6005

Tom

Ohio Mike
09-27-2012, 10:25 PM
That is a rather odd selection. Plenty of machines use circulating oils which in this case is Mobil's DTE Series, however Heavy/Medium oil is ISO-68 (SAE-20 for comparison) and that is much lighter than the recommendations I've seen for similar saws. I think most folks simply go to their local auto parts store or Walmart and get some 85w-90 multi-weight oil and be done with it. My small saw is a Jet 5x6 and they recommend an ISO-460 (SAE-140) gear oil. In that case I'd recommend Mobil SHC-634 fully synthetic (Enco Part #325-6005).

Edit: If you want something lighter than 140 you could buy Mobil SHC-630 which is a SAE-50 weight in the 600 series synthetic gear oils. It is also an Enco stock item.

CMcmillan
09-27-2012, 10:31 PM
I thought it looked like a bit of an odd selection too. I would go get some regular 85-90w oil from autozone but since the drive gear is brass all that stuff they sell has the additives that can corrode it.
So I'm not sure what to get.

Ohio Mike
09-27-2012, 11:03 PM
The Mobil 600 series products I mention are in Mobil's own terms "yellow metals" safe and are specifically engineered for industrial gearboxes. Unfortunately I can't speak to the multitude of other products available.

bandsawguy
09-28-2012, 06:25 AM
All the gearbox I do with worm and wheel get Mobil SHC632. Here in Canada I buy it by the 19L pail and keep it in both our service trucks. Not cheap though I sell it for around $28 a litre.

Rex
09-28-2012, 04:25 PM
Any 140wt gear oil GL1 - GL4 will be safe for yellow metals.
In fact I bet if you stopped at Tractor Supply and bought some straight 140W you would be in good shape. that's what I'm going to do

CMcmillan
09-28-2012, 07:22 PM
That is a rather odd selection. Plenty of machines use circulating oils which in this case is Mobil's DTE Series, however Heavy/Medium oil is ISO-68 (SAE-20 for comparison) and that is much lighter than the recommendations I've seen for similar saws. I think most folks simply go to their local auto parts store or Walmart and get some 85w-90 multi-weight oil and be done with it. My small saw is a Jet 5x6 and they recommend an ISO-460 (SAE-140) gear oil. In that case I'd recommend Mobil SHC-634 fully synthetic (Enco Part #325-6005).

Edit: If you want something lighter than 140 you could buy Mobil SHC-630 which is a SAE-50 weight in the 600 series synthetic gear oils. It is also an Enco stock item.

I think I'm going to get the SHC 634 here,

http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INSRIT?PMAKA=325-6005

CMcmillan
09-29-2012, 01:44 AM
And I forgot to ask, when we got this saw and loaded it into the van we had to lay it down on its side. When we got home to unload it we found it leaked oil a bit and when we got it out it was dripping some oil, presumably just some oil leftover from what leaked in the van because it stopped once wiped up. Cleaned it up and hasn't dripped or leaked since but the oil level is low and needs replaced.

Is it normal for these things to leak a little if layed on their sides while driving bumpy roads? Or is there a bigger problem here? Lord i hope not

PeteM
09-29-2012, 03:32 PM
First, you want to use a heavier weight gear oil, such as Rex suggested.

Second, the gear boxes I've seen are meant to be sealed but often develop leaks. If yours has a sleeve bearing for the drive wheel, that's one common place. If a ball bearing, it may be the seals. Another common place for leaks is the seal of the gasket and the cover.

I'd remove the blade and check the wheel to see if the bearings are tight. Then open up the gear box and check for any excessive wear on the worm drive elements. Assuming both are OK, button it up and don't worry about a bit of oil leakage -- just top the oil off now and then.

Good news if you have worn parts is that you can usually find replacements fairly easily and reasonably priced.

CMcmillan
09-29-2012, 07:01 PM
First, you want to use a heavier weight gear oil, such as Rex suggested.

Second, the gear boxes I've seen are meant to be sealed but often develop leaks. If yours has a sleeve bearing for the drive wheel, that's one common place. If a ball bearing, it may be the seals. Another common place for leaks is the seal of the gasket and the cover.

I'd remove the blade and check the wheel to see if the bearings are tight. Then open up the gear box and check for any excessive wear on the worm drive elements. Assuming both are OK, button it up and don't worry about a bit of oil leakage -- just top the oil off now and then.

Good news if you have worn parts is that you can usually find replacements fairly easily and reasonably priced.

The SHC 634 I linked and planned to get that Ohio Mike suggested is a good heavy weight isn't it?
http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INSRIT?PMAKA=325-6005

When checking the drive wheel where do I find the bearings to see if they are tight?
The worm gear and drive gear are both in great shape by the looks of things.

krutch
09-29-2012, 08:22 PM
I've got a buffalo that had grease in the gearbox and it was not lubing the gears. Found that when I had to replace the gears, I used some oil for the headstock on my lathe. Been many years since then and no problem with it.
Now that I wrote that, the damn thing will probably quit on next week!

PeteM
09-29-2012, 11:18 PM
The SHC 634 I linked and planned to get that Ohio Mike suggested is a good heavy weight isn't it?
http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INSRIT?PMAKA=325-6005

When checking the drive wheel where do I find the bearings to see if they are tight?
The worm gear and drive gear are both in great shape by the looks of things.

The Mobil SHC 634 is a good choice -- I was just pointing out that an 80-90 weight oil is a bit thin per manufacturer's recommendations and especially so for a box that leaks a bit.

The bearing for the drive wheel is located in the cast iron frame. One side visible from inside the gear box. If you have a plain sleeve bearing and don't get any wobble (blade off) when trying to move the wheel out of plane, it's likely OK and the clearances tight enough you won't get a lot of oil leakage at that point. It's harder to tell if the shield is leaking on a ball bearing simply by inspection, but you'll know once you've added your oil and run the saw for a while. The fact your worm gear looks fine is a plus -- even if you have some slow leakage it's likely the bearings are also in working order..

CMcmillan
09-30-2012, 02:48 AM
The Mobil SHC 634 is a good choice -- I was just pointing out that an 80-90 weight oil is a bit thin per manufacturer's recommendations and especially so for a box that leaks a bit.

The bearing for the drive wheel is located in the cast iron frame. One side visible from inside the gear box. If you have a plain sleeve bearing and don't get any wobble (blade off) when trying to move the wheel out of plane, it's likely OK and the clearances tight enough you won't get a lot of oil leakage at that point. It's harder to tell if the shield is leaking on a ball bearing simply by inspection, but you'll know once you've added your oil and run the saw for a while. The fact your worm gear looks fine is a plus -- even if you have some slow leakage it's likely the bearings are also in working order..

Ok, picking up some of that oil tomorrow. I have my saw in the vertical position *use this as reference*, when I try to pull the drive wheel out tword me or push it in it has absolutely no wobble or slack. When I try to turn the wheel is a different story and it turns a little bit in each direction but I assume that is normal. it seems everything checks out.