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View Full Version : Looking for 5/8-10 acme rod



oxford
09-28-2012, 08:25 PM
I am not sure if wanted ads are ok for this forum or not, so sorry in advanced and mods can delete this it it is not ok.

I am in need of a piece of 5/8-10 LH precision acme screw. I need around 1 foot of it, slightly under would be ok. If someone has a piece left over from a project that they want to part with let me know. I need to repair a worn cross slide screw. Also if someone knows where I can get a short piece new could you post a link. I looked around and it seems like the 5/8-10LH is kind of an oddball. I think all I saw new was a 6' piece and was more than I wanted to spend. Thanks.

Tony Ennis
09-28-2012, 08:35 PM
You have a lathe :-)

wierdscience
09-28-2012, 08:52 PM
5/8-10LH by the foot-

http://www.roton.com/Mating_Components.aspx?family=7160450

elf
09-28-2012, 08:59 PM
5/8-10LH by the foot-

http://www.roton.com/Mating_Components.aspx?family=7160450

They don't show the precision specifications.

Dr Stan
09-28-2012, 09:09 PM
There's a place up around Green Bay that has all sorts of threaded rod. Just cannot remember the name, hopefully another member can help out.

Dr Stan
09-28-2012, 09:11 PM
They don't show the precision specifications.


Just call them Monday

Bill Pace
09-28-2012, 10:07 PM
Be aware that Roton has a $60 minimum order.....

McMaster has it in 3 foot lengths -- about $50

Dr Stan
09-28-2012, 10:18 PM
Well I found the company, Green Bay Manufacturing :p

They do not list 5/8-10 LH Acme, but I'd still call them as they may know of a source.

oxford
09-28-2012, 10:35 PM
What kind of specs are suitable on rod to use?

Dr Stan
09-28-2012, 11:32 PM
Try Tools for Cheap http://www.tools4cheap.net/

oldtiffie
09-29-2012, 03:59 AM
And what about the nut?

oldtiffie
09-29-2012, 04:59 AM
Originally Posted by wierdscience

5/8-10LH by the foot-

http://www.roton.com/Mating_Componen...family=7160450


They don't show the precision specifications.

Just what specifications and tolerances do you need?

It can't be too fussy for a cross-slide screw.

And the nut?

Forrest Addy
09-29-2012, 06:42 AM
Nook Industries:

http://www.nookindustries.com/acme/AcmeInchInfo.cfm?id=27

Talk to them. They sell precision grades, blank nuts etc. Not cheap but very good

big job
09-29-2012, 07:05 AM
Wholesale tool three foot, left and right around $15 dollars I just looked them up.

three foot UPS 6&12 foot truck ship

PixMan
09-29-2012, 07:22 AM
I still have the 1144 Turned, Ground & Polished rod, plus the 16ER-10ACME LH threading inserts that I had used to make a cross slide screw for a friend's Harrison lathe. I don't know where you are, Oxford, but if anywhere close to me I invite you to come over and we'll make you a new screw.

oxford
09-29-2012, 09:32 AM
Pixman, thanks for the offer. I am in eastern PA, a little to far to drive to Mass.

Big job, I didn't see 5/8-10LH listed in the WT site.

Oldtiffie, I really don't know what specs on rod I am looking for. What should be used for a cross slide screw? The nut I can still get new from clausing and a gent on Ebay has them as well. I can also get a replacement screw from clausing to the tune of $325 :rolleyes:

Forrest, I looked at nook and did not see that rod listed, I could give them a call.

Dr stan. I will give greenbay a call.

Too bad rokon has a minimun order.

kitno455
09-29-2012, 12:20 PM
Is this a Logan 14"? I happen to have a cross feed screw for one of those, complete with gear and cast iron nut...

allan

oxford
09-29-2012, 12:30 PM
No, it is for a Clausing 12" 5914.

justanengineer
09-29-2012, 01:55 PM
I really don't know what specs on rod I am looking for. What should be used for a cross slide screw?


You want as much thread engagement as possible between the feedscrew and the nut as possible to minimize backlash. I would encourage making your own as it is one of the easier of the "intermediate" projects IMO and is very gratifying. Once youve mastered it, you can literally make your own feedscrews/nuts for any machine within the size capabilities of your machines, and of any material. I commonly use any low carbon "cheap" steel for this, as I acquire lots of small scrap pieces that are basically free to me, and as a hobbyist it still takes seemingly forever with proper lubricate to wear these out, in which case I will gladly make another. The best part - as long as you have a functioning lathe and spare toolbit (or spare end of one), it doesnt really matter how sloppy/much backlash there really is in the machine now. You can "take up" the backlash to make a new screw and nut, and thereby eliminate most all of it, unless of course the old parts are missing or damaged.

Something to consider - buying acme rod and nuts may be easy, but it wont allow you to minimize the backlash as much as making your own because there is a fine line between tiny backlash and the nut and rod not fitting together, so any manufacturer is guaranteed to not really give you an (IMO) acceptable backlash. Not that backlash is important, bc its pretty easy to compensate for, but when I spend money or effort to do something I tend to be a bit anal about it.

Assuming this is compensating for wear and not damage, are you sure the screw is worn, or is it just the nut? If there is similar/significant backlash across the entire range of travel, replace the nut. If backlash is limited to one portion of movement, or changes dramatically, your screw is worn and you may not need the nut.

oxford
09-29-2012, 08:47 PM
Justanengineer, I hear what you are saying about making my own. I currently have the lathe in pieces cleaning it up and fixing what I can. I don't have power out to the garage to run it yet(hopefully soon) I also have way too many projects going on right now to get involved with it. I do enjoy and get satisfaction out of doing stuff like this myself though. The screw is hour glassed and is easily seen by eye. It was only a matter of time before there would have been no threads in the middle of it. The nut is also worn, you can feel the slop when you get to the far end of the screw which shouldn't have much wear in it. When it was together and on the lathe you could grab the cross slide and easily get .100", probably more, of movement by pushing and pulling on it.

dfw5914
09-29-2012, 08:55 PM
http://www.mcmaster.com/#acme-precision-lead-screws/=jicb2e

Not terribly expensive.

oldtiffie
09-29-2012, 09:09 PM
Realistically and within reason it doesn't matter if there is significant back-lash ie clearance between the nut and the screww as there wouldbe many lathes (and mills) a lot worse off that do very good work.

The job is always approached (travelled/moved to) the job one way - forward/in if external/turning work or "forward" in "boring/internal" work on the lathe.

"back-lash" is the toal of lead-screw end-play at the collar, looseness of the nut on the carriage as well as clearance between the screw and the nut.

The "feed in" dial is indicative only as the final measurement/s should be taken with a micrometer etc. The actual error between any two points that are relatively close is almost negligible.

If it were me, I'd put the lathe (only one you have?) together, get a new lead-screw, modify it as required and insert it in place of the old lead-screw (and nut).

PaulT
10-01-2012, 11:56 AM
What kind of specs are suitable on rod to use?

Don't go too crazy on the accuracy, the standard rod that McMaster.com sells has accuracy specs that won't make you jump up and down but keep in mind that's over a foot. The relative accuracy you will get on it for the short distances that you use when you cut a typical part will be fine.

Paul T.
www.springtest.com

hsm'er
10-01-2012, 03:32 PM
They don't show the precision specifications.

I contacted Roton a couple years ago and they told me:


Our lead accuracy is .003 - .006 / foot of linear travel.

Gunsmithing
10-01-2012, 06:10 PM
Acme is not hard to sign point thread on lathe it fast. Last one I did was 1/2 x 10 tpi took only 15 min to do.

Dave


Don't go too crazy on the accuracy, the standard rod that McMaster.com sells has accuracy specs that won't make you jump up and down but keep in mind that's over a foot. The relative accuracy you will get on it for the short distances that you use when you cut a typical part will be fine.

Paul T.
www.springtest.com

Duffy
10-01-2012, 10:56 PM
Nobody has mentioned them yet:- Keystone Threaded Products. They are in Ohio. I ordered both 9/16" RH and 1/2" LH and Bronze nuts to match. Delivery was quick and the price was fair. You might have to do some "funny machining" to adapt the nut and I heartily recommend Evan's Delrin replacement. For it the only tools you need are a drill, vise and a hair drier!

oxford
10-02-2012, 03:53 PM
What is Evan's delrin replacement nut? Would delrin be an upgrade to the brass/bronze nuts that were originaly in there? I also need to replace the compound nut and I can probably get my hands on some delrin scrap to make these out of. It would probably also be easier tapping these since I would have to make one out of the rod.

Duffy
10-02-2012, 05:46 PM
Delrin will very definitely be an upgrade from the original "yellow metal." Look for it in the Shop Made Tools sticky, I guess. It ran about a year ago. The nut is literally made around the screw that you will use, so whether it is ground or not does not really matter. The finished nut will have as little backlash as is possible.

kwoodhands
10-02-2012, 06:14 PM
Look in the yellow pages for Concrete form suppliers. Call them and ask if they carry it.I have used 5/8 acme rod for years with certain heavy duty gang forms. The rod is sold in long lengths but they might cut you a piece from a rental. A lot of the acme rod is rented,especially in the large sizes.
mike

Tony Ennis
10-02-2012, 06:19 PM
How to make a nut from Delrin. (http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/threads/43645-Making-Acetal-leadscrew-nuts-the-easy-way)

It's a great thread. (I'll get me coat...)

oxford
10-02-2012, 07:01 PM
Thanks for the link Tony, I ended up finding and reading through it while you posted it. I think I am going to give it a try, worst that can happen is I will be in the same boat I am already in. Also since money is pretty tight right now, I should be able to use some standard acme to save some money and get enough scraps of delrin for free to do it. I may also attempt the halfnuts to see how it will work out. Thanks again guys.

oxford
10-17-2012, 01:17 PM
Some things came up and I am getting back to this project. Will the standard 1018 rod be fine or should I go with the 4140? http://www.mcmaster.com/#acme-precision-lead-screws/=jrfr9b

Mcgyver
10-17-2012, 02:54 PM
Just what specifications and tolerances do you need?

It can't be too fussy for a cross-slide screw.

And the nut?

for a lathe crossfeed screw the accuracy of the screw and nut just about doesn't matter. On the mill its another matter and really matters on the lathe leadscrew, but not the feedscrew. Why? accuracy of screws is measured as the lead error, usually per foot. because the cross slide is invariably used to move only short distances an exacting amount, what might seem a large lead error over 12" is nothing over the distance you're infeeding. a large .006" lead error over a foot is 1/100,000's of inch over the .020" infeed you might do after mic'ing.

The nut matter less....in theory a pin sticking in the thread groove would produce the same accuracy of advance as the best fitting nut (wouldn't last or take much load though, point being backlash is irrelevant)