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bborr01
11-02-2012, 11:22 AM
Hello Everyone,

For the last week or so I have been having headaches and I am a person who rarely has headaches. Then Wednesday morning I got up and felt a little light headed so I called for a doctors appt. Appointment was 2 weeks away. Then Thursday morning I got up and was seeing double along with a headache, so I called the doctors office and they got me in at 1pm same day.

Doctor looked in my eyes and said something looks different in one as opposed to the other. He said could be thyroid related or tumor or something like that. I was thinking along the same lines about tumor. He scheduled me for a mri Thursday night. Well, I had the mri last night and they said everything looked normal. No tumors or anything else that shouldn't be there. That was a huge relief.

Next step is to see a opthamologist and I am impatiently waiting for that to happen. Meanwhile, I can't drive and can only read or use the net with one eye closed. Very frustrating.

I am in my mid 50's, have never needed glasses, have not had any trauma lately and have no idea what is happening with my eyes. Riding to the hospital last night one lane was straight ahead and the other lane was about 20 degrees angled.

Has anyone else experienced something like this? If so, what was the problem.

Thanks,
Brian

firbikrhd1
11-02-2012, 11:34 AM
Sorry to hear about your trouble Brian. I've never personally had anything like that. The worst I've experienced was a partially detached retina that affected the vision in one eye. That was scary enough!
If you have begun taking any new medications lately perhaps they could be at the root of the problem. Drug interactions can do some very odd things.
Good luck with finding the solution. My thoughts are with you.

wierdscience
11-02-2012, 11:57 AM
I had similar once which turned out to be some completely blocked up Sinus passages on my left side.

fjk
11-02-2012, 12:31 PM
Doctor looked in my eyes and said something looks different in one as opposed to the other. He said could be thyroid related or tumor or something like that. I was thinking along the same lines about tumor. He scheduled me for a mri Thursday night. Well, I had the mri last night and they said everything looked normal. No tumors or anything else that shouldn't be there. That was a huge relief.
Brian

What kind of doctor? Your GP or an ophthalmologist? If your GP, I suggest you go find an ophthalmologist. Who looked at the MRI? Immediate turnaround like that could be a bit suspect. Now that I think of it, did the MRI use gadolinium contrast? Some tumors do not show up very well without contrast.

Frank

wawoodman
11-02-2012, 12:54 PM
Most important: DON'T PANIC! Plenty of time for that later, if it becomes necessary.

I have strabismus. One of my eyes is sort of rotated down and out. When I close one eye and then the other, my view shifts. It's gotten worse as I get older. Glasses ground to accommodate the prism takes care of it. I also have one pupil that doesn't respond the same as the other. No apparent cause. (Yes, I've had the MRIs, too.) See your ophthalmologist first. He may send you to another specialist.

Good luck.

Weston Bye
11-02-2012, 01:17 PM
Don't pass this off lightly.

My wife had a similar progression of symptoms with the addition of Bell's palsy. Turned out to be sarcoidosis afflicting the central nervous system. She had had a previous bout with sarcoid in the respiratory system, the most common place affected, but it flared up again years later. This time it affected a group of nerves serving her cheek, eye steering, and worst of all, the optic nerve.

She was passed around to all the doctors who carefully and repeatedly measured her field of (non) vision, stramismus, etc, etc,.. All the while, things were deteriorating.

I had done a lot of internet research and heavily suggested all this time that they check for sarcoid. But who was I? After all, the occurrence of this form is some miniscule percentage.

By the time they were done screwing around with their meticulous measurements and tests, and scratching their heads, the damage was done. She is functionally blind in that eye. She goes around looking wall-eyed also. The nerves that steer that now-blind eye were also damaged.

If you even think you might have had sarcoidosis in the past, get it checked out fast.

JRouche
11-02-2012, 02:32 PM
Bout five years ago I had a similar experience. But mine only lasted at most one minute. I couldn't imagine it lasting longer, what a horrible condition. Try an eye patch to allow you to drive and function till they get a handle on it.

With mine it was like my eyes would become "UN-synched" and then I would have some terrible double vision. Actually had to cover one eye to function for that minute of whatever it was.

It just stopped happening and I haven't thought about it till seeing this. I sure hope they get a handle on it for you. JR

flylo
11-02-2012, 02:40 PM
Brian, is it your dominate eye that's out of sink? Years ago I got a pc of steel in the eye, had it removed but had to wear a patch on my dominate eye & it really screwed up everything I did. If on the non-dominate one would have been much better. I hope your back to normal (or in your case as close to normal as you were) soon!

Evan
11-02-2012, 03:02 PM
It is called diplopia. Try looking up causes of diplopia here:

http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1214490-overview

BigMike782
11-02-2012, 03:03 PM
My wife woke up one morning in May 2011 and felt a twinge and started seeing double.......long story short they diagnosed inflammation where the optic nerve passes from the spinal column to the brain.In her case it went away on it's own but we may never know WHY it happened.If it happens you need a neuro opthamologist I would do everything I could to see Dr. Christopher Glisson at the Hauenstein Neuroscience Center in St. Marys Hospital in Grand Rapids.
Good luck!

Evan
11-02-2012, 03:17 PM
I will go out on a limb here as I am not a doctor. Are you diabetic? If so then consider this from the site I linked.



An important diagnostic clue is provided by detecting pupil sparing but otherwise complete third nerve palsy (eg, ptosis; inability to elevate, depress, or abduct the eye). A pupil whose function is spared, particularly if associated with complaints of headache or pain around the orbit, is virtually diagnostic of diabetic third nerve palsy. This can avoid expensive and unnecessary imaging studies. Complete and spontaneous recovery after approximately 6 weeks is virtually the rule. Similar temporary mononeuritis multiplex processes can affect the sixth cranial nerve (abducens) with temporary loss of abduction.


"Pupil sparing" means that both pupils react the same to changes in light.

Rustybolt
11-02-2012, 03:56 PM
Has anyone else experienced something like this? If so, what was the problem.


Bourbon

michigan doug
11-02-2012, 04:48 PM
Diplopia sucks. There are a lot of things that can cause it. Get it checked out promptly. Most of the causes are not life threatening and can be treated.

I'm an optometrist and see this with some regularity. My dad also got a bad case of it 5 or 6 years ago. His was due to myasthenia gravis, which is caused by an auto immune problem that attacks the junctions between the nerve and the muscles. The eye muscles are often hit first.

You can also have infectious problems that affect the nerves that control the eye muscles responsible for keeping the two eyes coordinated. There are also vascular problems that can cause this.

It's a long list...

Even cataracts can cause diplopia or triplopia, but your history sounds nothing like cataracts due to the sudden onset.

I'm not your doctor, so I can't give you any medical advice other than, get it checked out.

Good luck and keep us posted.

doug

laddy
11-02-2012, 05:20 PM
Quick LOOK in your wallet! For the first time you will have double your money. Hope you feel better Fred

flylo
11-02-2012, 05:42 PM
Double your tools & machines too!

HWooldridge
11-02-2012, 05:55 PM
From your description it could be a mild stroke. My aunt had very similar symptoms and it turned out to be a stroke around the optic nerve. It went away on its own - but a stroke eventually killed her some years later.

Evan
11-02-2012, 06:06 PM
A stroke should have been seen on the MRI.

J. Randall
11-02-2012, 07:53 PM
Stay after it until you find out, MS sometimes manifests itself with double vision as one of the early symptoms. Hope it is nothing serious.
James

Evan
11-02-2012, 09:13 PM
Has anyone else experienced something like this? If so, what was the problem.

Diplopia is the first sign I have that I am going to fall asleep shortly with no option to stay awake. That would be from narcolepsy. Since I started taking Modafinil that hasn't been as much of a problem. Modafinil is a non-amphetamine mild stimulant without addictive properties. I can only tolerate about 1/5 the usual dose but it makes it possible for me to avoid falling asleep with only a few minutes warning.

bborr01
11-02-2012, 10:51 PM
Hi Guys,

What a whirlwind this last couple of days. Two days ago I was preparing myself to be told to get my affairs in order. I have always been pretty healthy. But this came on so fast.

I got in to see a opthamologist this afternoon and after a lot of tests, he told me that I have palsy of the optical nerves. I asked him what caused it and was told that there is no known cause or at least no single cause. I asked him what needed to be done to fix the problem and he said it would just take time. Like 2 to 3 months normally. Later he told me it could be up to six months. I see him again in a month unless something changes before then.

Looks like no driving for a while but my wife is pretty good about helping me if I need help. Also looks like my shop that I just went commercial with a few months ago will be doing a little less for a while. Mostly it just feels good to know that there wee no tumors. I have a family history of cancer. They are also doing a complete blood work.

Oh, and I now have a sporty eye patch so that I can walk around without walking into things.

Thanks to you all so much for the moral support and advice. I really think of this board as the brain trust of the internet and will re-read all of your posts and try to digest all of the information.

Brian

flylo
11-02-2012, 11:07 PM
Argh Captain Hook! Bet you look great in that patch. Don't use sharp tools or you may get the hook to go with it! Hope all goes well & keep us posted please.

tyrone shewlaces
11-02-2012, 11:27 PM
I had a little bout with Bells Palsy about three months ago. Mine affected the left side of my tongue and jaw. It was strange and uncomfortable, but once it was diagnosed and I accepted it, it was just a bit annoying. It was gradual and I seem to have passed through it about two weeks ago, but of course tongue and jaw are pretty crude compared to anything optical. I'm just guessing that I've passed the point where I can notice it anymore, but with the precision of eye alignment and coordination, you might require a bit longer than that to feel back to normal. That is if everything else were equal - noone would accuse me of being a health nut so you could get over it faster, or take longer for some other reason. Good luck.

A.K. Boomer
11-03-2012, 10:22 AM
While most all of my double vision has been self induced I will say this - at least when it comes to focusing having proper rest is very important,
one of the first muscle groups to act up when tired are the muscle groups that squeeze the eye ball to change it's shape, toss in a little older age and crystalization and hardness of the eyeball and these tiny muscles really have their work cut out for them.

Iv felt this effect many times and sometimes it seems to effect one eye more than the other, when this happens and im trying to look at something direct it does kinda make it seem like it puts me into a little crosseyed mode. almost as if the one eye that can't adjust its focus correctly then resorts to searching for proper depth perception and therefore getting out of adjustment that way,(crosseyed) . I could see an extreme case even giving me a headache if it continued for awhile...

It's at least worth asking the real simple questions first - are you getting enough rest?
what about potassium?


Of course - im no eye doctor and precious time could be a wastin, so listen to Wes and Mich. Doug... all im saying is its worth asking the question I think - even if on the way to the eye doctor .....

Evan
11-03-2012, 11:41 AM
Nerve palsy can be caused by many things. It means the nerve isn't conducting signals properly. That is what happens when your foot "goes to sleep". A little extra pressure somewhere on the nerve will do it as will chemical imbalances of various kinds. So can more serious problems such as pressure from a tumour or stroke but in this case it is most likely a muscle that has developed a little charley horse and spasmed on the nerve pathway.

A.K. Boomer
11-03-2012, 11:48 AM
Evan - so could potassium actually play a role in this?

Evan
11-03-2012, 12:02 PM
Yes but not just one nerve. Electrolyte imbalance would cause a lot larger problems to all systems before it would cause something like this. Also, it wouldn't be unilateral. A systemic problem would be bilateral.

A.K. Boomer
11-03-2012, 12:44 PM
really is amazing when you get right down to it how trouble free most of us have been over the years, when you take into account the millions of things that can go wrong,
Are we perhaps one of the most maintenance free "machines" of all time?

I mean - next of course to the galapagus turtles...

michigan doug
11-03-2012, 01:10 PM
Now, for a bit of insider information. Ophthalmologists are trained as medical doctors first, then eye surgeons. They also get a modest amount of training in optics/glasses/contacts.

Optometrists are not medical doctors at all (that's me), but get lots and lots of training exclusively dealing with optics and vision and muscle problems. To get your diplopia diagnosed, and to rule out all the bad things, go to your ophthalmologist. Once you have a firm diagnosis, go to the optometrist to figure out a pair of glasses with prism to get your residual (if any) diplopia fixed up.

Prism can work wonders. Most optometrists are better than most ophthalmologist at figuring out prism problems. Assuming you have any residual diplopia.

Also, there are optometrists that specialize in binocular vision problems, which is what you have. They have a dozen other tricks to resolve your diplopia using eye exercises, glasses, etc. If you want to talk to a VT doc, call any optometrist and ask them who their favorite Vision Therapy referal doc is. They will all have one, unless they them selves specialize in VT.

Most ophthalmologists think VT is one tiny step above witch doctoring. They are plain wrong.

Good luck, keep us posted.

By the way, yes, I agree this group is smarter, much smarter than the average bear.

Finest regards,

doug

bborr01
11-03-2012, 03:30 PM
What kind of doctor? Your GP or an ophthalmologist? If your GP, I suggest you go find an ophthalmologist. Who looked at the MRI? Immediate turnaround like that could be a bit suspect. Now that I think of it, did the MRI use gadolinium contrast? Some tumors do not show up very well without contrast.

Frank

Hi Frank,

The doctor was my GP. He reccomended a ophthamologist. The hospital had a radiologist on staff to read the mri. They also did the mri about 30 minutes without die and then injected dye through an IV and did another 10 minutes or so of mri.

Thanks,
Brian

bborr01
11-03-2012, 03:35 PM
My wife woke up one morning in May 2011 and felt a twinge and started seeing double.......long story short they diagnosed inflammation where the optic nerve passes from the spinal column to the brain.In her case it went away on it's own but we may never know WHY it happened.If it happens you need a neuro opthamologist I would do everything I could to see Dr. Christopher Glisson at the Hauenstein Neuroscience Center in St. Marys Hospital in Grand Rapids.
Good luck!

Bigmike,

If things don't progress like they should, I will keep Dr. Glisson in mind. How did you hear about him from the four flags city?

Brian

bborr01
11-03-2012, 03:39 PM
I will go out on a limb here as I am not a doctor. Are you diabetic? If so then consider this from the site I linked.



"Pupil sparing" means that both pupils react the same to changes in light.

Evan,

No, not diabetic. BP at doctors office was 124/68. My BMI is 22.5. Ideal is from 20-25.

I feel fortunate to be dealing with something that appears a lot less serious than what I read that you are dealing with. I also don't have the mental abilities that you have for diagnosing my own problems.

Brian

bborr01
11-03-2012, 03:43 PM
Diplopia sucks. There are a lot of things that can cause it. Get it checked out promptly. Most of the causes are not life threatening and can be treated.

I'm an optometrist and see this with some regularity. My dad also got a bad case of it 5 or 6 years ago. His was due to myasthenia gravis, which is caused by an auto immune problem that attacks the junctions between the nerve and the muscles. The eye muscles are often hit first.

You can also have infectious problems that affect the nerves that control the eye muscles responsible for keeping the two eyes coordinated. There are also vascular problems that can cause this.

It's a long list...

Even cataracts can cause diplopia or triplopia, but your history sounds nothing like cataracts due to the sudden onset.

I'm not your doctor, so I can't give you any medical advice other than, get it checked out.

Good luck and keep us posted.

doug

Hi Doug,

The ophthamologist mentioned myestenia gravis too but didn't think that was the problem. He did order blood tests just in case.

This forum sure has a broad range of followers. Reading the thread about members occupations the other day really surprised me. Thanks for the advice.

Brian

bborr01
11-03-2012, 03:49 PM
While most all of my double vision has been self induced I will say this - at least when it comes to focusing having proper rest is very important,
one of the first muscle groups to act up when tired are the muscle groups that squeeze the eye ball to change it's shape, toss in a little older age and crystalization and hardness of the eyeball and these tiny muscles really have their work cut out for them.

Iv felt this effect many times and sometimes it seems to effect one eye more than the other, when this happens and im trying to look at something direct it does kinda make it seem like it puts me into a little crosseyed mode. almost as if the one eye that can't adjust its focus correctly then resorts to searching for proper depth perception and therefore getting out of adjustment that way,(crosseyed) . I could see an extreme case even giving me a headache if it continued for awhile...

It's at least worth asking the real simple questions first - are you getting enough rest?
what about potassium?


Of course - im no eye doctor and precious time could be a wastin, so listen to Wes and Mich. Doug... all im saying is its worth asking the question I think - even if on the way to the eye doctor .....

Boomer,

I am not sure if I am getting enough potassuim or not. How does potassium effect the eyes?

As for rest, since I retired over 6 years ago I get plenty of rest. I even treat myself to a nap now and then. Sometimes late in the evening I will wear reading glasses because my eyes are tired, but not very often.

Brian

bborr01
11-04-2012, 01:04 AM
A few other things to mention.

When I look out of my eyes at about 1:30, up and to the right, the diplopia goes away. It is only a very small area but I can see fine in that area. When I got up this morning I noticed a slight improvement with that area of vision. Now when I look to the right from about 1 to 3 oclock the diplopia goes away.

Doug,
About prisms. Yesteday when I was at the ophthamologists he held a prism in front of one eye and the problem went away. I asked him if I could get a pair of glasses that have prisms so I could see normally and he told me that it would likely be price prohibitive and would need to be changed often.
I have also considered checking into therapy. I know of a Dr. Hohendorf who deals in vision therapy. Another thing I have been wondering about is how the headaches relate to the vision problems. I am wondering if the headaches were started by the nerves having problems well before I started seeing double. The headaches have been a little better since I have been wearing the eye patch.

Thanks for a lot of good advice. It is very much appreciated.

Brian

A.K. Boomer
11-04-2012, 10:04 AM
Boomer,

I am not sure if I am getting enough potassuim or not. How does potassium effect the eyes?

As for rest, since I retired over 6 years ago I get plenty of rest. I even treat myself to a nap now and then. Sometimes late in the evening I will wear reading glasses because my eyes are tired, but not very often.

Brian


potassium effects the muscles and muscles control both focus and depth perception alignment - we all are crosseyed looking at things up close - if you hold a finger in front of you and focus on it your very crosseyed, remove the finger and don't reposition your alignment and you will see double off in the distance,,,

If your focus adjustment is messing up (tiny muscles that squeeze the eye ball to change its shape)
then sometimes your eyes will go into the alignment search mode to try and dial things in,
at least this is what seems to happen to me - that's when I get double vision.

Potassium is just one of the key minerals it takes to keep muscles running smoothly...

im no expert - I just try to cover some basics first,,, as Evan stated he thinks you would be experiencing problems with larger muscle groups first - but I did read years ago that the focus muscles are the very first to act up due to them being so tiny and really having their work cut out for them esp. when one gets older due to the eyeball crystalyzing and becoming harder and non-pliable.

I was driving the other night and had to pull over to read a map, the map was an entire blur, and it's kinda like it was two blurs, it took minutes and was frustrating as all hell for my eyes to adjust enough so that I could hold it at a distance to read the small print...

My shoulders are getting better - it means my eyes might shortly follow, cuz then I can play tennis again and every hit back and forth is a great eye exercise with both focus and alignment,
eye's are like anything else - use it or lose it - by using it you help to keep the eyeballs more pliable whilst at the same time strengthen the muscles that conform them...

Its worth speculating to some degree but Mich Doug's the one to listen too...

Rest is important and sounds like you got that covered - bananas are a great source of potassium...

bborr01
11-16-2012, 01:05 PM
UPDATE:

Well, it has been a couple of weeks since I was diagnosed with "palsy of the sixth optic nerve". My field of normal vision has gone from one about the size of a baseball held at arms length to about six inches wide and top to bottom. That probably means that it went from less than one percent to about ten percent. It's a start.

I have done a fair amount of reading on the subject and it seems that no amount of therapy will do anything for it, just time. I think that the opthamologists estimate of 2 to 3 months recovery time seems likely.

Couple of other things. When this first started, I had to close one eye to navigate in foot or I would walk into things. I started to close my right eye because my left eye is my dominant eye and it was easier to close the right one. Then I got a patch and put it over the right eye. After a couple of days I put it on the left eye and tried to walk. Just about fell over within 2 or 3 steps, so I switched it back to the right eye. The doctor never said which eye to cover. I looked in the mirror without the patch and turned my head side to side and found that my right eye is the one not tracking properly. It would go from far right to center but not to the left at all. Now I have started to wear it on the left eye and my brain has adjusted to that. No more feeling like I am going to fall down.

I have found that I have been able to do anything that I could do with 2 working eyes, it just takes a little longer. This has taught me a lesson in patience that I probably needed to learn as I have never been the most patient person. Wonder how long that will last when things get back to normal.

One other very interesting thing. Night vision. The eye patch does not block out 100% of the light, but most of it. One night I was walking from my shop to the house in the dark. Couldn't see a thing, except some light coming from around the eye patch. I pulled the patch away and could see things like I had night vision goggles on. Pretty amazing. I always knew that eyes adjusted to light conditions but never covered one eye for long enough to have a dramatic change like wearing an eye patch all day.

Just thought I would share this in case anyone was interested.

Brian

flylo
11-16-2012, 02:12 PM
Glad your getting better Brian! It sure sends a message when something changes like this doesn't it? Keep improving, Eric

bob_s
11-16-2012, 03:52 PM
Brian:

Question
Prior to development of the symptoms had you been machining/handling a lot of 1144 steel, brass or zamac?

see

http://www.infinitehealthresources.com/Store/Resource/Article/1-4/2/1156.html

check out mercury --> parasthesia visual disorders

Other heavy metal toxins include Aluminum, Antimony, Barium, Bismuth, Cadmium, Cesium, Nickel, Platinum, Rubidium, Thorium, Tin, Tungsten, and Uranium.

Alistair Hosie
11-16-2012, 04:12 PM
i WAS SEEING DOUBLE FIRST TIME i WENT TO THE STATES AND FALLING OVER WHEN i TURNED QUICKLY IT TURNED OUT TO BE VERTIGO WHICH SPOILED MY HOLIDAY /VACATION AS IT RUINED IT FOR TWO WEEKS BEFORE i COULD WALK DRIVE ETC.i HOPE IT IS NOTHING SERIOUS eVAN SEEMS TO BE ON TO SOMETHING aLISTAIR

bborr01
11-16-2012, 06:18 PM
Bob,

No, I have been machining mostly 1018 CRS. No brass, zamac or 1144 at all. A little aluminum too. What is the connection with these materials?

Alistair, did you get yourself an eye patch. That helped me a lot. Not much fun seeing double, is it?

Brian

Evan
11-16-2012, 06:46 PM
I am very familiar with diplopia. It is one of the reasons I was forced to quit my job with Xerox. In the late 90s my inability to stay awake was really becoming serious (narcolepsy and/or similar problems). As I said before, for me diplopia is the first sign that I will be falling asleep with no option. Back then I was just able to stay awake while driving but to drive I had to cover one eye with a hand so I could see well enough. I finally had to quit my job which in the long run has cost us around half a million dollars. Without a definitive diagnosis (impossible back then) I could not qualify for long term company disability.

The extreme light sensitivity you have noticed is indeed caused by wearing the eye patch. The chemical in the eye that is responsible for the action of the rod cells (light intensity receptors as opposed to colour receptors) is called Rhodopsin, aka visual purple. During the daytime bright light depletes the store of visual purple so that by nightfall the rod cells are not very sensitive. We are not adapted to living in bright sunlight but instead in the jungle with little direct sunlight. This varies somewhat depending on the shape of the skull. Neandertal had very deep set eyes which provided a natural sunshade. I have the same.

When your eyes become fully adapted they are several magnitudes more sensitive to faint light. However, even just a few seconds of bright light can temporarily destroy the adaption until more visual purple is produced. That one rational for building fully divided highways.

michigan doug
11-17-2012, 11:12 PM
By the way, it's theorized that's why pirates wore patches, to have "night vision goggles" under certain circumstance.

Keep us posted how you're getting along.

doug

bruto
11-18-2012, 12:16 AM
I have a somewhat different nerve palsy, resulting in partial double vision. I was hit by a car while bicycling this spring, and though I luckily escaped the worst of it (that is to say I didn't get killed) I broke a couple of neck vertebrae and suffered brain and brain stem trauma (and a bunch of other boring stuff). One of the worst consequences is palsy of the "fourth cranial nerve," also known as the trochlear nerve, which controls rotation at the top of the eyeballs.

I can drive now with both eyes open, having about 1/3 to 1/2 the visual field binocular, the rest doubled owing to tilted eyeballs. I see through the windshield fine but have to squint to see the gauges clearly. I saw a neuro-ophthalmologist, whose opinion is that for me an operation would be a poor choice, because I function pretty well now, and there's a risk in an operation. If I had to occlude one eye to get around, drive, etc. then it would be a better choice, since even a bad result would just mean I'd have to keep occluding it. But I guess I'm stuck, hoping that over the years it might get a little better and that my brain will continue to figure out ways to process what it gets. In the case here I'd certainly keep all options open and get plenty of opinions. My case is obviously a bit different, because they could see the damage on the MRI, and everyone involved knows exactly what has happened and why, and also, amazingly enough, I have not had any headaches.

bborr01
11-19-2012, 01:42 PM
Evan,
I also used to have episodes of falling asleep involuntarily but I think mine was more related to shorting myself of sleep. As to diagnosis for your diplopia years ago, they sure do make use of technology nowadays. Lots of high tech and I am sure high $$$ equipment at the opthamologists office. Interesting information on the rod cells and Rhodopsin and all new to me. Most people who have to wear an eye patch probably don't experience this because they can't see out of the covered eye even when they uncover it.

Doug,
I wondered why so many pirates were missing an eye. I figured it was from sword fights. Maybe it was just for night vision.

Bruto,
Bummer to get hit by a car but it sounds like you feel lucky to be alive and probably are. As to eye surgery, the thought of it makes my skin crawl a little bit but if I was faced with no eyesight or surgery and the possibility of eyesight I think I could get my head around it pretty easily. Glad to hear you are doing OK and hope that maybe time will give you further improvements.

As to my eyesight, I got up yesterday morning and the non-double vision part of my field of vision increased form about 10% to about 30 or 40%. I am ecstatic and feel fortunate that things weren't worse than they were.

Brian

bborr01
02-02-2013, 06:31 PM
UPDATE:

Yesterday marked 3 months since I came down with sixth nerve palsy. I am very happy to report that my eyes are back to normal. In fact, I think they might be a slight bit better than they were before this ordeal. Mabye the exercise of using only one eye at a time made them stronger.

The ophthalmologist was pretty clost with his prognosis of 2 to 3 months for a recovery. The timing was pretty good though. I delivered a job the day before it started and didn't have anything come into my shop for 2 1/2 months. Just as things started to return to normal I had another job come in that was about a 2 week job.

I found a forum of sorts dealing with sixth nerve palsy and that helped me mentally to be able to read about other peoples experiences with it. What a long, strange trip it's been.

Brian

michigan doug
02-03-2013, 12:11 AM
glad to hear you're doing well.

finest regards,

doug

Your Old Dog
02-04-2013, 10:18 AM
From your description it could be a mild stroke. My aunt had very similar symptoms and it turned out to be a stroke around the optic nerve. It went away on its own - but a stroke eventually killed her some years later.

My friend is in rehab right now due to the same symptoms. I am on blood thinners for a condition called Atrial Fibrilation wherein the heart studders, a clot forms in the heart and then gets released into the brain. The blood thinners are to prevent the clot from forming. Know the signs of stroke and there are many places on the web with help.

flylo
02-04-2013, 11:08 AM
Good for you Brian, I'm glad!:D

Alistair Hosie
02-04-2013, 03:22 PM
I had a similar problem when I first went to America something happened and I saw double then kept reeling over and falling down I had a form of vertigo eventually it went away but they said it could be a tumor.I had a very unpleasent two weeks before mit cleared up fortunately we went for a month so I did get a little bit of the holiday after all.The problem we all complained about was cabin pressure in the plane we all got headaches and they thing something caused me to have double vision and balancing problems.Alistair