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Ridgerunner
11-02-2012, 12:23 PM
I am making new skids for a snow blower and on one pair I would like to bend and glue Delrin Acetal to the bottom. The Delrin is 3/4 inch thick and I have tried heating it with 2 commercial heat guns but did not want it to melt. The screws I turned and milled out of the same delrin material to bolt the 3/4 material to the 1/2 inch thick 1018 steel skids that I bent. Can this thick delrin material be bent and is there a glue (waterproof?) that will help hold it to the 1018 steel? Thanks for any advice.
The rusty skid plates are the old worn ones in the first picture.

http://i1122.photobucket.com/albums/l539/ridgerunner1212/Snowblowerskids1.jpg

http://i1122.photobucket.com/albums/l539/ridgerunner1212/Snowblowerskid2.jpg

http://i1122.photobucket.com/albums/l539/ridgerunner1212/Snowblowerskid3.jpg

atomarc
11-02-2012, 12:32 PM
I have heated and formed similar material although not that thick. While I don't know the answer to your question I will say that I think you are going to have problems with the areas where the socket heads are countersunk. The material is going to try to tear there and the hole will become deformed such that I doubt the fastener will even fit back in.

I would try bending before I drilled and countersunk the bolts.

Stuart

michigan doug
11-02-2012, 03:27 PM
There is pretty much no glue that will reliably stick to delrin.

Not that I know of anyway. I've been wrong before.

doug

1-800miner
11-03-2012, 01:14 AM
Rather than bending, consider shortening and beveling the edges to match the bevel of the steel part,

jnissen
11-03-2012, 06:51 AM
DO you have any scrap to play with? I'd heat up the scrap to near melting and then try to form it at that point. It will probably be best in an oven that heats slowly and evenly with a piece that thick. I would then machine the holes in the bottom after the bend was put in place. I think the holes will elongate and be difficult to maintain shape. I just don't know of a good way to bend a piece that large without getting it near the melting temp.

You could always post machine it to clean up the edges if that is a concern. Heating it will likely round off some of the sharp corners you have now.

RussZHC
11-03-2012, 10:02 AM
Rather than bending, consider shortening and beveling the edges to match the bevel of the steel part, I think this too...if you want to have a more complex milling operations, get an even thicker piece and mill so as to slide over the bent ends of the steel part (i.e. more depth than just beveling). For what it is worth when I added skid plates to a much lighter project, I sort of beveled/radiused the ends just so edges would not catch...wasn't acetal though

Ridgerunner
11-03-2012, 06:12 PM
Thanks everyone for the advice and suggestions. I do have a scrap piece I could practice on. I was hoping there was a glue for this stuff in case I bash the plastic in to something under the snow.

yul m6
11-04-2012, 08:48 AM
Delrin has a softening temp around 300F. try your kitchen oven.

browne92
11-04-2012, 09:37 AM
Delrin has a softening temp around 300F. try your kitchen oven.

Just not when the wife is looking! :)

Edit: Google came up with this: http://www.reltekllc.com/adhesives-for-delrin.htm