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Evan
11-02-2012, 01:18 PM
I'm back, sort of. I still have a great deal of work to do but I should explain my absence.

When I disappeared it was because I made an important discovery regarding my medical conditions and it was absolutely imperative that I research it thoroughly as quickly as possible to verify and document it. I have the final hearing on my disability claim coming up at the end of January and what I found nails my claim totally. I have been spending nearly every waking moment working on this and it is 100% correct. I am sorry for forgetting about a couple of people that I promised to send items to and will rectify that asap. When I get into something like this I forget everything else.

I have a wide variety of things wrong with my body and have been seeing many doctors for the last 30 years trying to find out what is wrong. It is only in the last couple of years that actual diagnoses have been forthcoming. However, none of the diagnoses go any deeper than simply verifying that the symptoms are real and represent some real medical problem. No doctor has been able to tell me the causes. That makes it impossible to determine what to expect in the future or what might be available in the way of root cause treatment.

What set me on this investigative track is my recent stroke. I learned sometime after that my cousin who owns a ranch in Montana also had a nearly identical stroke at nearly the same time. Cousin Pete is my age and we have always been good friends. He is a retired cop who worked for the feds and the state of CA and is now retired on disability. We started comparing notes and there are enough similarities in our medical conditions that I became very suspicious that there must be a genetic connection. I have been convinced of that for a long time but this information gave me a place to start looking.

The single key information is that we both have the same visible evidence of a genetic mutation. As children we both had one unusual feature, a patch of hair that was nearly platinum blonde. That hair eventually fell out fairly early, about age 30. When I looked it up I expected to find it was reasonably common. It isn't. No matter how hard I looked on line I was only able to find a single image of another person with the same type of hair colour. That really jacked up my WTF sensor.

I shortly found it was related to a gene in mice called "Piebald Lethal". The word lethal really got my attention. Then I discovered that humans have the same genetic feature and it is called Piebaldism. I also discovered that it only appears in about 1 in 400,000 live births. You are born with it and it doesn't change except for falling out. The reason it is so rare is the mutation is usually lethal to the foetus.

It looks like this:

http://ixian.ca/pics10/Evan_Williams_1957a.png

When I started looking into it I opened Pandoras's Box. In it I found every single one of my symptoms including ones that I had entirely forgotten or never even considered as in any way related to my current issues.

Every single one of my numerous medical issues save one are explained completely down to the tiniest detail by a series of related genetic mutations on one copy of Chromosome 4 that I inherited from my mother and the Danish side of the family. It includes my stroke, LO-CCHS (Central sleep apnea), Narcolepsy, Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia, Postural Hypotension, Carotid Sinus Hypersensitivty, Atrial Fibrillation, Polycythemia, Elevated Free Light Chains and other immune issues, fibromyalgia, coeliac disease as well as a number of other issues such as bad teeth and hypersensitivity to bright light. The one that isn't explained is due to a distant past infection and doesn't require explanation.

I even discovered a probable reason that I am still alive, which I definitely should not be. I have an especially mild form of the sleep apnea that doesn't kill you before age 20. There are about 50 known cases in the world.

It is all genetic, it's all directly related to Piebaldism and it's all on one copy of chromosome 4. My Aspergers is most likely on the other copy from my father.

I have always been interested in genetics so I had a leg up on the search. I knew what I was looking for. I found it, in spades. Genetic defects are often clustered near the ends of genes or the segment boundaries. That is what nails this to the ground.

This map shows the 4 most important mutated genes that are responsible for the majority of the serious problems I have.

http://ixian.ca/pics10/genes.png

Just those four genes are the cause of 90% of my problems. There are several more that code for things like tooth enamel that are nearby but they aren't relevant to my real problems. Coeliac disease is on there as well. It's even known as "Scandinavian type".

This is absolutely amazing. Not only does it explain everything it isn't a conjecture. The Piebald mutation is completely diagnostic by the blonde patch and the rest follows as is documented by studies. What has not been documented is anyone living to my age (and my cousin) with this set of problems. Piebaldism doesn't always kill people but the commonly associated LO-CCHS does. That stands for Low (lethality) Chronic Congenital Hypoventilation Syndrome. It has only been documented so far in somebody as old as about 50 in the last couple of years. In fact, I could not have figured this out even just a few years ago. The Human Genome Project is turning the medical world upside down and it is impossible to overemphasize just how significant this new knowledge is to medicine.

I am currently working on what amounts to a Paper/Case Report and together with my doctor it may be published. He was already planning to publish a case report but has been waiting to see what more could be found out about my condition. He is blown away by what I found. So am I.

I still have a lot more work to do in documenting this so you may not see much of me here for some time.

If anybody reading this has a similar type of hair colouration you should visit your doctor for some checks even if you feel perfectly well. The mutation greatly raises the risk for certain type of cancer, especially multiple myeloma which is what my grandfather died from. He of course had the same mutation. It is autosomal dominant which means you only need one copy and if you have that copy it is operational. However, my grandfather managed to live into his 80's before it killed him. That may be due to the other thing I found. On the same chromosome 4 there is a gene that when mutated codes for exceptional longevity. It has an unknown protective effect. Not all mutations are bad but this one doesn't make much difference to the gene pool. Exceptional longevity runs on both sides of my family so I may have a chance to at least make it to 70.

The best news about all this is that my children did not inherit it and so then neither did my grandchildren. I have been looking for this for around 30 years and I finally have the answer. It is a very strange feeling.

EddyCurr
11-02-2012, 01:26 PM
Well done.

flylo
11-02-2012, 02:03 PM
Good job. Glad your back!

dp
11-02-2012, 02:56 PM
Interesting sleuthing, Evan. I have several things in common with slight modification - I had white hair as a kid but it turned darker in my 20's. I had a dark patch of hair, very small, that I could never see but my mother spent a lot of time trying to scrub it out. My father was born in Denmark. I have central apnea (an obvious fact to me but which sleep studies fail to identify. With central apnea you stop breathing - no obstructions are involved. I don't even have to be asleep to experience it.). If I have other similar symptoms I'm not aware of them, but I'm now curious. How did you go about having your DNA examined?

RussZHC
11-02-2012, 02:59 PM
From what you have written, I guess the good thing is its sounds like you will now not have trouble "establishing" what is actually going on or has happened with you as far as the medical community is concerned.
From my own experiences it is hard not to give up trying to prove something, like a medical condition (never really sure what to call it when there is seemingly no cause) when you are outside that community. There is no one that can know their own body better than themselves and compared to years ago, the internet access can be tremendously helpful BUT trying to convince others can be insurmountable esp when similar symptoms can go in opposite directions vis a vis treatment, if there even is a "treatment".
Knowing, as you now do, will help tremendously, esp the mindset. Plus that last line is no small bit of importance. I can't imagine how it feels.

michigan doug
11-02-2012, 03:38 PM
Determination is the number one predictor of success.

I see a lot of determination on on Evan's part.

It is satisfying to have a definitive diagnosis after all this time.

doug

Evan
11-02-2012, 04:17 PM
How did you go about having your DNA examined?

I haven't. The piedaldism is definitive, especially since we can trace it back photographically through 4 generations. There are only a few syndromes that cause that sort of white hair patch. Piebaldism usually has associated melanin free skin patches but not always. Vitilligo always does and progressive, piebaldism is never progressive with a single isolated exception traced to another gene. Waardenberg Syndrome is similar but always is accompanied by some degree of deafness and/or eyes of two different colours, usually green and blue. We had a cat with that defect, he was stone deaf and a one blue and one green eye. Also, the facial structure is affected with eyes far apart.

The only thing left is piebaldism. It is absolutely diagnostic. The matchup between known associated mutations and the placement on the chromosome clinches it.


With central apnea you stop breathing - no obstructions are involved. I don't even have to be asleep to experience it.). If I have other similar symptoms I'm not aware of them, but I'm now curious.

Awake breath holds are a part of LO-CCHS and not much else unless you are at high altitude or have serious COPD. It resembles Chenye-Stokes breathing but not quite. Chenye-Stokes is usually seen as people are near death or are seriously short on oxygen. You should see your doctor and have your kappa/lambda free light chains checked. That is the most deadly side effect of piedaldism, the strong predilection to myeloma. Most doctors have never heard of piebaldism because it is so uncommon.

Keep in mind that I am not a doctor so I am free to give medical advice. Also remember it's worth what you paid for it. See your doctor for the real thing.

Evan
11-02-2012, 04:34 PM
Knowing, as you now do, will help tremendously, esp the mindset. Plus that last line is no small bit of importance. I can't imagine how it feels.

I showed this to my doctor. He is extremely critical and requires close to absolute proof before he will accept my evidence on anything. When he saw this it took about 2 minutes and he was completely convinced. Every doctor know enough about genetics to understand how definitive this is. A matchup like this simply cannot be coincidence, especially when there are absolutely no differential diagnoses. That means there are no other plausible explanations that take into account all the presenting symptoms. This one does and perfectly too.

And yes, knowing with certainty that our kids don't have it is a huge relief. We have two children and coin flipped in their favour each time.

cuemaker
11-02-2012, 04:45 PM
And yes, knowing with certainty that our kids don't have it is a huge relief. We have two children and coin flipped in their favour each time.

I dont know if there is a "best" part to this story, except maybe what hard work can bring, but the above is definatly the icing on cake...

Is there a luck gene? Maybe you passed that one on too...

Dr Stan
11-02-2012, 06:20 PM
Evan,

Wow. Its tough to figure out what to say, but a whole lot easier than to deal with your condition. Now that the cause has been pinned down what can be done? Given you and your cousin have beaten the short longevity odds coupled with the rarity of the disease is there anyone who has researched it and found someway to at least control it?

I wish you well and hope you can at least find some relief.

Stan

sasquatch
11-02-2012, 06:23 PM
Wishing you also the best from here Evan.

(This place seems strange at times without your'e postings!!)

beanbag
11-02-2012, 06:53 PM
So I guess you can stop blaming the chemicals you worked with back in your photocopy days?

Evan
11-02-2012, 07:41 PM
No chemicals or other environmental variables. The old nature vs nurture argument is finally settled. Nature (genetics) has the big stick and nurture just sometimes kicks off what genes may be expressed. EVERYTHING is genetic. Environment can change that by causing mutations and it can change what genes kick into gear to deal with environmental stressors. The system is incredibly complex. The piebald (KIT) gene is one of the big players. Every cell has every gene but depending on what the cell does for a living many of the genes are suppressed so most mutations have no effect in those cells. The KIT gene is different from most. It is responsible for acting as a receptor for a chemical signalling agent, Tyrosine Kinase. That is used by many other cells in the body and especially mast cells, aka stem cells. Mast cells are everywhere and are a major part of the immune system. KIT is also responsible for melanin which it what give our skin and hair colour. However, melanin has a lot more purposes than that. It also is used in the ear as part of the cochlea and if missing you don't have hearing. That also applies to many other mechanisms in the body. I still haven't researched all the possibilities and there are many.

Right off the top the KIT receptors directly control the activation of about 20 other genes, including one that controls angiogenesis. That is the production of new blood vessels including in the brain. My stroke has been diagnosed as a burst ateriovenous malformation (AVM) and the AVM was most likely produced by an out of control gene that should be modulated by KIT. If the KIT receptor in any cell isn't working right then the Tyrosine Kinase signals don't act as they should.

I think there is a good possibility that now that I know what is going wrong at the bottom level I may be able to figure out some treatments to reduce some of the effects. This sort of problem is so rare that there are no attempts being made to figure out how to control it. They are only just approaching figuring out how to recognize these types of problems. I have already found one very likely connection that nobody seems to be aware of. That isn't the least surprising since the flood of new possibilities is overwhelming for the research community.

wierdscience
11-02-2012, 07:51 PM
Good to hear you have a definite answer,sometimes just knowing is a relief.

So one question,when do we get to see pictures of all the cool home built gene splicing and re-sequencing equipment that you are no doubt dreaming up?:D

Arcane
11-02-2012, 09:06 PM
Welcome back Evan!

rohart
11-02-2012, 09:57 PM
Very well done for your research and analysis, and good luck for the future. Don't lose sight of the fact that combating possible strokes may be very important for you.

Evan
11-02-2012, 10:20 PM
All I need to do for a stroke is stay standing. My blood pressure drops to about 80/40 . Just prop me in a corner and I will be fine.

sid pileski
11-02-2012, 10:30 PM
So, Evan Now what? Does this mean that now that you know what it is and has been, that you can more effectively manage your health and treatments?
Hope you can.

Sid

aostling
11-03-2012, 12:04 AM
I have been looking for this for around 30 years and I finally have the answer. It is a very strange feeling.

Evan,

I think this is the most amazing thread in the history of the forum. I can hardly imagine your emotions when you learned that your multitude of symptoms had single explanation, a syndrome with a name.

In principle, might piebaldism be treatable by gene therapy? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gene_therapy If so, I expect you to be consulting on the precision tools that would require.

wtrueman
11-03-2012, 01:22 AM
Hi Evan: Good to hear from you. Good luck. BTW: I did 1650 miles before home in the Model A.. Send a PM and I'll send a Xmas card of my wife Jan, me and "Baby", Wayne.

Evan
11-03-2012, 01:56 AM
In principle, might piebaldism be treatable by gene therapy?

I doubt it. It would have to somehow repair the existing gene in most of the cells in the body. While not all cells need the Tyrosine Kinase receptor enough do that it wouldn't be possible to target them selectively. As I said, this is incredibly complex. This is a map of the KIT signalling pathway. KIT sits there in each cell that needs to be activated or deactivated and a host of other genes in other cells send out chemical signals to do that. KIT directly affects human stem cells that can turn into whatever cell is needed within the limits allowed by other genes. KIT turns this on an off when it is working correctly. When it isn't you get things like over prolifereration of gamma globulin which results in myeloma or excess blood vessels in the brain or not enough melanin in the hair and skin.

http://ixian.ca/pics10/kitpath.png

All the little white blocks contain the names of other genes that interact with KIT.

I must cite this so here is a description to go with it.



Kit is a cytokine receptor that belongs to the type III receptor tyrosine kinase family. It is structurally similar to platelet-derived growth factor recpetors (PDGFRs), colony stimulating factor-1 receptor and fms-like tyrosine kinase. Kit signaling is plays important role in a number of physiological processes including erythropoiesis, lymphopoiesis, mast cell development and function, megakaryopoiesis, gametogenesis and melanogenesis. Sequence alterations in the c-kit gene are found to be associated with different cancers including hematopoietic malignancies, gastrointestinal stromal tumors, germ cell tumors, small-cell lung cancer and pancreatic cancer. The primary ligand for kit receptor is stem cell factor (SCF). It is also known as Kit ligand, steel factor or mast cell growth factor. SCF is a glycosylated, non-covalent homodimer. Alternative splicing and proteolytic cleavage results in soluble and membrane bound forms of the protein. that binds to two KIT monomers. Binding of SCF to KIT results in the dimerization of the receptor and its autophsphorylation. The residues that are known to get phosphorylated upon ligand binding include Tyr568, Tyr570, Tyr703, Tyr721, Tyr730, Tyr823, Tyr 900 and Tyr936. Signaling events downstream of the KIT receptor are well studied. Among the signaling cascades that are activated are the Ras/Raf/MEK/MAPK and the PI3K/AKT/RPS6K pathways. KIT stimulation is also known to activate the JAK/STAT and PLC/PKC signaling pathways. Among the other key proteins that are regulated by KIT are the kinases BTK, TEC, LYN, SRC, FYN and JNK. Regulation of KIT receptor tyrosine kinase occurs through many mechanisms. Activated KIT receptors are degraded via CBL, a E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase. CBL induces the degradation of the receptor via the proteasome or lysosome. KIT can also be dephosphorylated and inactivated by the protein tyrosine phosphatase Shp1. Also, activation of protein kinase C results in a negative feedback loop, wherein it phosphorylates specific serine residues leading to the inactivation of KIT.
Please access this pathway at NetSlim database.

If you use this pathway, you must cite following paper:

Kandasamy, K., Mohan, S. S., Raju, R., Keerthikumar, S., Kumar, G. S. S., Venugopal, A. K., Telikicherla, D., Navarro, J. D., Mathivanan, S., Pecquet, C., Gollapudi, S. K., Tattikota, S. G., Mohan, S., Padhukasahasram, H., Subbannayya, Y., Goel, R., Jacob, H. K. C., Zhong, J., Sekhar, R., Nanjappa, V., Balakrishnan, L., Subbaiah, R., Ramachandra, Y. L., Rahiman, B. A., Prasad, T. S. K., Lin, J., Houtman, J. C. D., Desiderio, S., Renauld, J., Constantinescu, S. N., Ohara, O., Hirano, T., Kubo, M., Singh, S., Khatri, P., Draghici, S., Bader, G. D., Sander, C., Leonard, W. J. and Pandey, A. (2010). NetPath: A public resource of curated signal transduction pathways. Genome Biology. 11:R3.

http://wikipathways.org/index.php/Pathway:WP304

Evan
11-03-2012, 02:16 AM
So, Evan Now what? Does this mean that now that you know what it is and has been, that you can more effectively manage your health and treatments?

That may be possible. I have a lot more studying to do to determine what I might be able to use to control KIT activation/deactivation without killing myself.

BillTodd
11-03-2012, 08:56 AM
[old-git] Bloody mutants ;) [/old-git]


But seriously...

It's good news you've tracked it down Even, 'cos it seems unlikely your doctor would have !

Now you have a name for it, the medical profession should take an interest (especially given its rarity) and hopefully offer you some treatment.

It must be a great comfort to know that your kids are clear of the syndrome :)

michigan doug
11-03-2012, 12:26 PM
Unfortunately, people who are affected by extremely rare conditions rarely get much interest from the medical research community.

1. There's no money in it. So what if you can totally improve the lives of 50 people. you'll never make your money back. Of course, they feel bad about that, but it is the financial reality.

2. there is generally no beneficial crossover to other conditions. If you figure out how to beat cancer A, that often has implications for cancer B. if you figure out how to fix the super rare thing, you most likely haven't fixed anything else as a bonus.

3. The research community is perpetually faced with the moral question of how to best use the funds and personnel to help the most people with the limited resources they have. That usually works out to the rare conditions don't get much attention. They're referred to as orphan diseases.

Of course, there are exceptions. If you run into a lab that has a director with a special interest in piebaldism, b/c that's what he wrote his phD in, you might get some traction.

Ultimately, I think Evan, you and your motivated GP are your best bet.

Finest regards,

doug

laddy
11-03-2012, 01:34 PM
Beautiful job of research and write up. I would think that the New England Journal of Medicine would be Delighted to publish such a story!!! It would help alot of people. Great Job! Fred

A.K. Boomer
11-03-2012, 02:04 PM
This is a fascinating read and info.

To me it's proof in the pudding as to the benefits of self diagnoses, all the details that doctors cannot possibly know about you, all you can do is scratch the surface when you go in for an office visit and try to remember all the details (in 15 minutes) - after all - who's on the 24/7 test drive right? who has the most invested interest in getting well?
who has only one real patient to focus on???

Good Job Evan and you very well might be on the right path, I - like beanbag stated can remember some of the blame being on the silicone lube for the copy machines - and still very well may be as far as your FM...

If there's one thing I can offer it's this, Don't exclude allot of your earlier brainstorming either,
I think it's a mistake for believing in everything being of "genetic predisposition" and my main belief is this;

Were so far off the mark with the most simplest of needs for proper biological function it's important to realize that all were simply doing right now is finding out who's the best cockroach,
anotherwords - there are many people who are suffering from one thing or another and yet would actually be excelling beyond "normal" had they been eating the correct things and exercising and such,

but instead they are like running a Ferrari on half kerosene - might get by if it was a yugo,
might not even start if it's an F-40, therefor the yugo is not "superior" in any way - except for the fact that its simply a better cockroach but it can basically run on part bat yearn due to it actually being inferior... (could be convenient though when alls you gots is bat yearn to run on - or "fast food")

Therefor, most all genetic predispositions are in question as long as the test studies are all people eating cooked food and incorrect foods with improper meal combining all while sitting on the sofa day in and day out, and all test studies usually are...

this is not hogwash, it's been proven - there are many so called predispositions that excel in the right set of circumstances - im not saying your particular one - but there is proof of many others for sure...

That being said - kudos Evan for as always taking things ten steps further - and also setting a great example....

Evan
11-03-2012, 03:28 PM
Beautiful job of research and write up. I would think that the New England Journal of Medicine would be Delighted to publish such a story!!! It would help alot of people.

That is the plan. I am working on an outline of the case study and then will turn it over to my doctor for his informed input and revision. Knowing him, it could be quite a while to see it anywhere. He is a procrastinator when it comes to paperwork. He does have a strong incentive though since if he publishes it counts toward his required yearly upgrading credit under our medical system. There is far more to the research than what I have posted here. In particular I seem to have found a very likely pathway causative of the type of stroke that I had. It appears to be at least unpublished at this time if not unknown.

I have also found an excellent source of information on each involved gene. When I said the complexity is incredible that was a serious understatement.

This is a complete map of all the genes relating just to muscles cells that the KIT gene interacts with. There are other such maps for other cell types. It is clear than nobody can be expert on even a significant part of the genome, never mind all of it. The subject is vast beyond comprehension. This is by far the greatest challenge I have ever addressed.

http://ixian.ca/pics10/kitmuscle.png

Evan
11-03-2012, 03:33 PM
Therefor, most all genetic predispositions are in question as long as the test studies are all people eating cooked food and incorrect foods with improper meal combining all while sitting on the sofa day in and day out, and all test studies usually are...

Not so. The majority of studies are done in animals because we share many identical gene sequences. The mouse is the most used because it has a great deal of similarity and we can do things to a mouse and genetically alter it in ways that are not permissible for humans. The knowledge gained is directly transferable to humans because the genes do the same things in people.


To me it's proof in the pudding as to the benefits of self diagnoses, all the details that doctors cannot possibly know about you,

I agree but with a very strong proviso. You must know what all the big words mean. I have been studying medicine all my life. Also, the only information worth paying any attention to is that from the respected medical journals and sources such as the National Institute of Health (NIH) and similar bodies around the world. Those are my sources, not internet forums or similar websites, not even ones that seem well informed. I also have a shelf full of medical books including basic information such as a full textbook medical dictionary that I purchased from a medical school. I was also very lucky to have a member of this board send me a full review book of all recent knowledge on Narcolepsy. It was expensive. Books like that can cost several hundred dollars. That reminds me, I have to get it back from my doctor. It was very helpful.

I currently have an electronic library of about 12 gigabytes of medical studies. EDIT: I just checked, make that 13.9 gigs, 1701 files, most are studies.

MotorradMike
11-03-2012, 03:41 PM
Wow. That's gotta be enough for a masters.

Welcome back.
You are an amazing guy.

Evan
11-03-2012, 04:04 PM
I have enough semester hours for a masters in engineering. About 210 I believe. I never claimed it because I would have had to take a semester in Vancouver at UBC or Simon Fraser and that was not feasible.

A.K. Boomer
11-03-2012, 04:32 PM
You make allot of sense Ev,
just glad the lapse on the board was from you hitting it hard - I thought you might be up to something - or at least hoped that's what it was all about...

I think it's gotten to the point that if anybody can fix Evan its going to be Evan...

and I know you already know this and I don't want to sound like a broken record - but you can take what is normally healthy people and make some or most of them unhealthy just by putting them on a bad diet, and in fact it will actually create certain types of specific "disease" - we all know this right?
so all im saying is what if what were calling a good diet really isn't one? then what do you call all the peoples who are having troubles symptoms?, and the fact that their children would react the same way?
is it a genetic predisposition?

We have to question how we got here, and how were now trying to remain here, and the two are not only like night and day, the latter also resembles a light switch as to how fast this is all taking place in comparison to the history of what got us here...

Evan
11-03-2012, 04:37 PM
When I disappear like that I never lurk or look at the board at all. It would be distracting. When I disappear permanently my wife is instructed to post a notice. I will probably write it myself.

lazlo
11-03-2012, 05:45 PM
I have enough semester hours for a masters in engineering. About 210 I believe.

A degree in engineering requires a lot of calculus, partial differential equations, ... A graduate degree even more so. I don't think you would like it much Evan...

Evan
11-03-2012, 08:41 PM
Nope but I can do the math. It isn't my strong point though. I don't have problems with the concepts of differentials or calculus and trig is a breeze. The area that gives me trouble is what makes it hard for me. I don't like algebra. It doesn't make sense to me. I think it is because it depends on axioms that don't have an intuitive basis. They just are. If I don't use it much I tend to forget the principles.

I have written some pretty complex programs using higher math including one for navigation using Kepler's Equations and the mean perturbations of the 112 or so elliptical functions that influence Earth's orbit. It agreed with the US Navy ephemeris to within about 500 yards maximum position error over a 10 year period. That's very acceptable since it is very difficult to time a sight closer than that. It allowed you to reduce sights to a line of position without needing the book of ephemerides. It ran on a VIC-20 in only 4K of ram since those were very popular for a time with sailors. They could run directly on 12 volt power and didn't even care what polarity, That was before you could buy navigation calculators for under $50.

lazlo
11-03-2012, 08:49 PM
A large portion of engineering candidates wash-out in the 2nd or 3rd year with the two semesters of electromagnetics (Maxwell's equations, tensor calculus). The equivalent wash-out class for mechanical engineers is thermodynamics, fluid mechanics (Navier-Stokes), heat transfer, etc.

A.K. Boomer
11-03-2012, 08:50 PM
When I disappear like that I never lurk or look at the board at all. It would be distracting. When I disappear permanently my wife is instructed to post a notice. I will probably write it myself.

Well that would be one sad post, but now that were on this topic it will just be silence on this end,

maybe someone will put two and two together that AK's finally "kacked" because they heard of some guy in Co. that got ate by his pit bulls after he "shelled out" and nobody was around to feed his dogs, toilet will keep them around for watering for a bit I guess...

I do have a friend that gives a ring and asks for a body count every now and then, but very inconsistent - lol


edit; actually - my carcass might end up in one piece,
as much as my dogs would almost kill for food they have a 44 lb bag of dog food open and standing straight up right next to both their dog dishes - it's always been that way - one's over a decade and the other over 15 years, leave the house for all day and night sometimes and never a problem - and one would literally eat herself to death if you fed her bowl after bowl...

they won't touch a food plate that's been left on the coffee table either - but I would hope they would tip the df bag over if they were starving to death...

Dang, I got some good kids u know?

rohart
11-03-2012, 09:04 PM
I can't understand how you can say you're OK with calculus, differentials and trigonometry, but you have difficulty with algebra.

Unless there's different terminology across the pond, like in the case of the trapezium versus the rhombus. I regard algebra as the screwdrivers and spanners of the game. Algebra is just the language you use to express and analyse the concepts and proofs of calculus, trig and the rest of it.

Or maybe uou're saying you have mathematical dyslexia - you can understand the deeper stuff, but mathematical 'spelling' is a problem, if that makes sense.

Evan
11-03-2012, 09:06 PM
I have become pretty comfortable with the thought of dying. I am on borrowed time as it is. I don't want to die but I won't have any choice in the matter. There is no point in wasting time fighting the idea or trying to ignore it. My "affairs" are already in order and have been for some time. Right now there is no deadline that I am facing but it is a pretty sure bet that one of the problems I have will get me and it could be without much or any warning. One thing I will not do is trade quality of life for a few more days of misery.

Evan
11-03-2012, 09:10 PM
Or maybe uou're saying you have mathematical dyslexia - you can understand the deeper stuff, but mathematical 'spelling' is a problem, if that makes sense.

That is a pretty good description. When I say I am comfortable with trig for instance that also includes spherical trig that is required for astronomical calculations. It all makes sense to me but for the algebra. It does not come easily.

+ or - Zero
11-04-2012, 02:54 AM
That is a pretty good description. When I say I am comfortable with trig for instance that also includes spherical trig that is required for astronomical calculations. It all makes sense to me but for the algebra. It does not come easily.

How about; Great with visualization, zero problem with conceptualization, horrible time with the descriptive jargon.

davidh
11-04-2012, 10:50 AM
thanks evan , for sharing with all of us. . . . .