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BigJohnT
11-04-2012, 10:04 AM
Anyone spun metal using a metal lathe?

I've seen some videos before and saw it once up close by some automated machinery... so I have the general idea of how it works. I have a Samson that will swing 16" without pulling the insert out, so a fairly stout lathe to work with and it will run as low as 80 rpm.

I'm looking for tips or any other information on spinning brass and aluminum. My neighbor wants to make a bullet shaped end for a 155 shell for his urn.

John

Dr Stan
11-04-2012, 10:18 AM
I have used a 16" Cincinnati to spin copper and when I visited a spinning company in Nebraska all of the manual spinning lathes were built using the head stock & bed from old clapped out metal lathes. There should be plenty of info available on the web and I'd bet Lindsay probably has books on the techniques.

mikem
11-04-2012, 11:01 AM
Where in Nebraska do they spin metals?

flylo
11-04-2012, 11:07 AM
I have an Oliver metal spinning lathe & the tools but haven't tried it yet so I'm very interested in learning how.

BigJohnT
11-04-2012, 11:15 AM
I have an Oliver metal spinning lathe & the tools but haven't tried it yet so I'm very interested in learning how.

Do you have a photo of it?

John

flylo
11-04-2012, 11:32 AM
Here you go.http://i1119.photobucket.com/albums/k631/fly-lo/th_1340660439.jpg
http://i1119.photobucket.com/albums/k631/fly-lo/th_1340660436.jpg

BigJohnT
11-04-2012, 11:43 AM
Pretty neat! The spinning tools are interesting.

John

Mcgyver
11-04-2012, 12:29 PM
not tried it but watched some excellent DVD's on it - there's enough to it, and enough different about it, that i would be watching those dvd's very carefully before powering up. I was left with the definite impression there are some basics to it that you just have to know to get it to work. It was at friends place, I'll try and get the name for you

bborr01
11-04-2012, 01:16 PM
Youtube has lots of spinning videos. Have not tried it myself ......yet.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DGszBVy3cgU

Brian

Dr Stan
11-04-2012, 01:18 PM
Where in Nebraska do they spin metals?

Kearney, NE

L & S Industries

l-sindustries.com

4100 E 39th St, Kearney, NE

Phone: (308) 236-5853

Dr Stan
11-04-2012, 01:20 PM
I have an Oliver metal spinning lathe & the tools but haven't tried it yet so I'm very interested in learning how.

Well who would have thunk it. :) flyo has a metal spinning lathe.

Any thing else you're hiding from us? :)

rythmnbls
11-04-2012, 01:29 PM
One tip is to use a cheap bearing as the "tool" point.

Pic here of spinning a flange on a sheet of 0.5mm 316 stainless using a 608 bearing as the tool.

http://i87.photobucket.com/albums/k142/madluther/Misc/100_0897.jpg

The lathe is an import 10x22 which coped with the load admirably.

Regards,

Steve

BigJohnT
11-04-2012, 01:59 PM
Steve,

Thanks for the photo that gives me some ideas to work with.

John

jeremy13
11-04-2012, 03:30 PM
Big John T I tried spinning it has a lot of learning curve. Plan on at least making 100 test try’s before you get it right. I bought the videos and made the tools. Still takes the finesse you get from doing it a long time. You say you want to make the nose cone for a 155? It should have a threaded fuse well. I would turn one from solid aluminum or go to Big Sky surplus and buy one. Back to using a metal lathe go for it. You need around 900-1200rpm for the spinning proses. I used my 16X60 lathe. The centrifugal force helps keep the spinning disk perpendicular to the shape you’re spinning on.

BigJohnT
11-04-2012, 03:38 PM
It will be interesting to say the least and that is 90% of the fun of trying new things... we don't seem to have a Big Sky surplus nearby nor do I see an internet presence for them.

John

flylo
11-04-2012, 05:06 PM
Well who would have thunk it. :) flyo has a metal spinning lathe.

Any thing else you're hiding from us? :)
Plenty! You were only 100 miles away, you could have stopped in & said Hi.

jeremy13
11-04-2012, 05:44 PM
I had the web site saved they go by CDVS now.
http://www.cdvs.us/Nose-fuses-C75.aspx

loose nut
11-04-2012, 06:47 PM
I spun a couple of pieces several years ago. First try on both failed but the second try was good on both. Fun actually. I used my 9 x 20 lathe for that and it should be OK for the occasional job but a hefty lathe is needed for regular work.

Dr Stan
11-04-2012, 07:01 PM
Plenty! You were only 100 miles away, you could have stopped in & said Hi.

That trip required a quick turn around. I'll have to see what the future may bring.

Dunc
11-05-2012, 02:12 PM
Here's some vintage links to get you started.

Metals & Spinning, 2nd Ed., Tuells & Painter, Machinery's Reference Book #57, 1912
http://archive.org/details/metalspinning00tuel

Metal Spinning, Crawshaw,Popular Mechanics Handbooks, c.1909
http://archive.org/details/metalspinning00crawuoft

Turning Lathes: A Manual For..., Lukin, c. 1890 (has a chapter)
http://archive.org/details/turninglathesman00lukirich

The above are downloadable in several ebook formats.

Popular Mechanics: Dec 1934, Feb 1942 & June 1954
go to http://books.google.com/books?id=RdMDAAAAMBAJ and navigate to the issues

Popular Science: May 1933 & July 1933
go to http://books.google.com/books?id=iigDAAAAMBAJ&source=gbs_summary_r&cad=0_0#all_issues_anchor
and navigate to the issues

I use a screen capture program to obtain these magazine files.

flylo
11-05-2012, 02:20 PM
Wow Dunc, That's fantastic, Thanks!

BigJohnT
11-05-2012, 03:02 PM
Dunc,

That is a ton of resources thanks.

John

bruto
11-05-2012, 06:29 PM
Long ago I watched a couple of metal spinners working at various places, and they were using wood lathes for pewter and copper, with modified tool rests and large wooden tools lubricated with wax. The speeds were pretty fast, and the loads on the bearings pretty high, so I think they liked the big (and easily replaced) ball bearings on a wood lathe head. They also were using multiple wood forms permanently mounted to face plates, so the availability of multiple face plates made the standard Delta thread a convenience.

There was one fellow at a New Hampshire League of Craftsmen show who was knocking off pewter bowls at a tremendous rate. He'd take a round piece of material, place it more or less on center of the form, bring in the tailstock, start spinning and center it with a hammer, then spin with a tool that looked a bit like the shaft of a canoe paddle, using what looked like a standard tool rest with holes in the top for metal pegs. Waxed and worn to a fine finish itself, the tool left the spun bowl needing very little further polishing.