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Tony Ennis
11-22-2012, 11:26 AM
edit - The subject should be 'Malt grinder' since brewers generally don't grind their grain to powder.

My son and I were at a brewer's supply shoppe yesterday to get some malt ground. I looked at the grinder. The two grinding cylinders looked like they were fashioned using a common knurling tool.

What type of metals (materials?) are food-safe, workable by my Craftsman 12", and reasonably durable?

Another option according to one site would be to use larger diameter smooth rollers.

shawnspeed
11-22-2012, 01:45 PM
Most brewers (commercial) use high capacity Roller mills, which is what you are describing....you can use a Grist mill as well, which is 2 chilled cast iron plates, one fixed the other rotating. The Roller mill is easy to build, if you have the equipment. The biggest thing to remember is that the drive side is on a fixed bearing shaft, and the other side is on a adjustable tensioned bearing assembly , so it can be set to near 0 clearance to the fixed side, and giving a little compliance in case of passing a hard object (like a stone or bolt) that are sometimes found in small grains. You aren't really grinding the grain as much as cracking it, so the enzymes are easily released. I started to build one years ago with 4" rollers , 8" wide, that were Knurled. the commercial units seem to have a variety depending upon what they will be doing..diamond strait or smooth patterns are all there, but for a home shopper , diamond knurl is probably the easy way to go. Also you will probably need a good size motor ...a farmer I know rolls corn in a 10" model and it has a 5HP motor on it....I would imagine on a small unit you would want around a 1-2 hp motor If I remember right The roller speed I was trying to get to was around 550 RPM...Hope this helps...Shawn......Oh yes ...plain old mild steel will work just fine unless you are doing thousands of bushels a year..

Black Forest
11-22-2012, 03:58 PM
Too bad there is an ocean between us or I would give you one. I have and old grain grinder that would work perfect for what you describe.

Norm W
11-22-2012, 04:01 PM
The old hand cranked meat grinder would work for small amounts, just use a coarse plate.

BigJohnT
11-23-2012, 09:23 AM
edit - The subject should be 'Malt grinder' since brewers generally don't grind their grain to powder.

My son and I were at a brewer's supply shoppe yesterday to get some malt ground. I looked at the grinder. The two grinding cylinders looked like they were fashioned using a common knurling tool.

What type of metals (materials?) are food-safe, workable by my Craftsman 12", and reasonably durable?

Another option according to one site would be to use larger diameter smooth rollers.

I've built a few malt mills and have plans (http://gnipsel.com/beer/equipment/beer-equipment.html) on my web site for a couple of malt mills. The rollers on hobby mills are knurled because they are too small in diameter. The knurls help pull the grain in between the rolls but at the same time they tear up the husks which is bad. The commercial mills I looked at before making mine all used carbon steel rolls and carbon steel chutes. The bigger the rolls the less slipping and tearing you get and also makes the idler roller self starting. The rolls for home grinding don't need to be very wide. My feed pipe is 1 1/2" in diameter and I can grind 25 lbs of grain in a minute or two.

John