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View Full Version : Steel-toed boots or not......



sophijo
11-25-2012, 09:50 PM
Did a search...nada. I recently had a highly respected machinist say to me that he'd rather have crushed toes than pinched off toes...or something like that. What's the skinny on steel toed boots; good idea in the shop or not?

tdmidget
11-25-2012, 10:10 PM
I have seen a forlift with solid tires run over a man's foot in steel toed boots. Scared him but no injury. Shoe looked kind of rough though.

cuemaker
11-25-2012, 10:15 PM
The force that would crush a ANSI steel toe boot would amputate, not crush, toes in an unprotected shoe, per ANSI....

I hated steel toe boots/shoes, until I found a pair of low tops that I found to be very comfortable. I dont do boots.

Here is what I have:

http://www.zappos.com/timberland-pro-mudsill-low-steel-toe-grease-black-oiled

gcude
11-25-2012, 10:16 PM
Didn't Mythbusters on TV already cover this? I wear steel-toed any time I go into my shop ... lost a big toenail twice before I changed my ways. Working smarter isn't always about getting a job done faster or with just the tools you have available at the time. Be safe.

UPDATE: Here are the results of the Mythbusters assault on the steel-toe boots:

http://kwc.org/mythbusters/2005/11/episode_42_steel_toe_amputatio.html

duckman
11-25-2012, 10:50 PM
I did not start wearing steel toed shoes until the night I was pulling a die cart with a 3,200 # mold on it and I stopped and the cart didn't rolled up on my toes did not break any thing but it sure hurt the rest of the night bought my STS the next day.

Dr Stan
11-25-2012, 10:54 PM
Did a search...nada. I recently had a highly respected machinist say to me that he'd rather have crushed toes than pinched off toes...or something like that. What's the skinny on steel toed boots; good idea in the shop or not?

You may want to check with him and find out if he wears his seat belt when driving or a helmet when riding.

Steel toes are a must, just like safety glasses. Early on I accidentally dropped a good sized piece of brass round stock end first on my steel toed boot. Cut the leather, but no foot injury. Plain leather boots would not have protected my foot.

ironmonger
11-25-2012, 11:02 PM
I didn't steel toed boots during the begining of my 40+ years in construction. Around 30 years ago or so most commercial/industrial contractors required their use. The problem was finding boots that fit me properly. Then I found Redwings.

I have worn Redwing boots with comfort for most of those years. ( I do not work for or own stock in Redwing... I just find them long wearing and comfortable). I tried less expensive footwear but the higher cost was not as much of a problem as the crappy fit of the others. Redwings work boots are still made in America.

The mythbusters episode should put to rest the cut off toes crap, if you buy shoes that fit properly, you will not even know that they have steel toes, and your feet won't hurt.

paul


Did a search...nada. I recently had a highly respected machinist say to me that he'd rather have crushed toes than pinched off toes...or something like that. What's the skinny on steel toed boots; good idea in the shop or not?

tdkkart
11-25-2012, 11:11 PM
I didn't steel toed boots during the begining of my 40+ years in construction. Around 30 years ago or so most commercial/industrial contractors required their use. The problem was finding boots that fit me properly. Then I found Redwings.

I have worn Redwing boots with comfort for most of those years. ( I do not work for or own stock in Redwing... I just find them long wearing and comfortable). I tried less expensive footwear but the higher cost was not as much of a problem as the crappy fit of the others. Redwings work boots are still made in America.

The mythbusters episode should put to rest the cut off toes crap, if you buy shoes that fit properly, you will not even know that they have steel toes, and your feet won't hurt.

paul


This.......
I wear my redwings 12-18hrs/day almost 7 days/week. My employer buys me one pair a year and they're just comfortable.
I wear them at work, in my shop, on my motorcycle, and when doing my volunteer ambulance duties. I don't mind having them on at all.

jkilroy
11-25-2012, 11:12 PM
If you work with any heavy material steel toes are mandatory.

11 Bravo
11-25-2012, 11:51 PM
I have to agree with what a few others have said. If you had something hit a steel toe boot hard enough to bend the steel toe and amputate the toes from your foot, you would have nothing left without a steel toe boot. The end of your foot would be exploded.

I have worn steel toes for over 30 years. Every employer I have ever had required them. That said, I wear them in my own shop all the time and wear them when doing about any work. Over the years I have had them save me foot injuries several times. Maybe these would not have been real serious injuries, but who wants a broken toe?

When I was a young man back in the early 80's, I had a tractor axle that had been leaned against a work bench fall over and hit the end of my steel toe boot. I had ear plugs in and was wearing a face shield using a die grinder on the bench next to the one with the axle leaned against it. I didn't hear anything and caught it moving out of my peripheral vision. I moved out of the way, but the splined end of the shaft hit the end of the toe on my left foot. It tore the leather off the end of the boot exposing the steel toe, but absolutely no damage was done to my foot.

Accidents happen, and they are called accidents because you are not planning on it happening.

They are like safety glasses and ear plugs. Just wear them.

Another plug for Red Wings. Very comfortable and the leather boots are still made in the U.S.A.

firbikrhd1
11-26-2012, 12:03 AM
Some Safety decisions made by people who sit in an office are quite interesting. The Fire Department I retired from insisted on Steel Toes in boots to be worn with work uniforms for 28 of the years I worked there. During my last year they suddenly decided there was too much liability in using steel toes and went to a composite toe boot. The Rubber Fire Boots still have steel toes but the work shoes have gone to composite toes.
Whether the event I am about to portray had anything to do with the decision or not, I can't say, but here's what happened a few years prior to the change:
There was a female firefighter on an Aerial Ladder, a 50 foot Squrt. Against all good practice the Driver Engineer extended the ladder while she was on it with feet on the rungs of the fly section. When her toes met with the rungs on the bed section of the ladder the steel toes peeled the tips of the boots right off leaving her bare tootsies in the breeze. Apparently the steel didn't give way but the leather behind them did. Fortunately for all involved her little feet didn't reach the tips of her boots so her toes were spared. For quite some time afterward other firefighters were calling that Driver Engineer up on the phone asking if his Aerial was two feet shorter.

In the end whether composite toes would have changed anything, I can't say. But apparently the Safety guys thought about that steel toe being crushed and trapping her toes in the boots and possible liabilities involved and decided upon composite toed boots for the future. There's no telling what will happen in the future if someone's toes are injured because the composite didn't stop something that steel would have. Curiously, NFPA decides what standards fire boots must comply with and they still include steel toes. They are likely to be worn while on Aerial ladders as well.

mayfieldtm
11-26-2012, 12:08 AM
I also watched a friend get his toes run over by a solid tire Hyster.
Talk about some hollerin and carrying on!
The boot clamped down hard like a critter trap.
I heard that the Doctor had a heck of a time cutting the boot off.
I remember that a couple toes were broken, but, Seth didn't loose any.

Tom M.

tyrone shewlaces
11-26-2012, 12:08 AM
The OP's respected machinist friend is human too, complete with faults just like the rest of us.

His statement is very similar to the argument against seatbelts which goes something like "Seatbelts hold you in place and get you killed by the engine being rammed into your rigid body when you would have otherwise just been knocked free", even when the factual evidence overwhelmingly proves the pro-seatbelt side.

I've had my feet and toes saved from pain and injury plenty of times with steel toes and probably will several times in the future. They are worth wearing. Personally I don't see any difference between crushed off toes than cut off toes. The hospital will clean it up for you either way. The steel toes will save you from having crushed toes in the first place a few dozen times before that one-in-a-million time when the incident where they don't help. If it's bad enough that the steel protector crushes your toes, you will probably be losing them anyway. At any rate, they would be more damaged without the "helmet".

Best not to get your foot under heavy stuff in the first place. In the meantime, comfortable steel toes are a good investment.

Boostinjdm
11-26-2012, 02:05 AM
For those that wear redwings, what model do you prefer. I've never even tried on redwings, but everybody seems to love 'em. I've got a few that look good to me, but won't get to try any on for a while.

macona
11-26-2012, 02:52 AM
Sears sells or sold, not sure anymore, Sketchers steel toed tennis shoes.

Jaakko Fagerlund
11-26-2012, 04:03 AM
I'm just happy that it is forced by work safety laws around here that you have to wear steel toed work shoes. And in every place I've been they have asked if I have my own so I can start immediately or will they have to wait a day or two to get them ordered & shipped to me.

So what if your toes would get smashed in the steel shoe? It would have been enough force to rip apart the whole leg if it wasn't steel in between. And that is really the one-in-a-million-accident, the most usuals are things that you can lift yourself (under 50 kg) and suddenly it drops/slips or falls over and boom, it hits your feet! Without steel shoes you would have had serious injury every time.

LKeithR
11-26-2012, 04:08 AM
I've been working and wearing boots since about 1964 and I've always worn steel toes. It's just foolish not to. Over that time I've worn a lot of different styles of boots but a few months ago I decided I was tired of tying bootlaces so I bought a pair of Blundstones. Hands down one of the most comfortable boots I've ever worn; and with a long shoehorn I don't even have to bend over to put them on...

http://www.blundstone.ca/csa.html

RLWP
11-26-2012, 04:38 AM
Did a search...nada. I recently had a highly respected machinist say to me that he'd rather have crushed toes than pinched off toes...or something like that. What's the skinny on steel toed boots; good idea in the shop or not?

Highly respected by who? He sounds like an idiot to me

Richard

vpt
11-26-2012, 08:07 AM
I just don't drop things on my feet.

I know when growing up all threw high school steel toe boots were the big redneck thing to have. All of them complained about frozen feet in winter.

willmac
11-26-2012, 08:40 AM
If you ever dropped something heavy on your foot while not wearing safety boots you would not need any encouragement to wear them in future, (assuming that you still could wear any kind of boot that is.) To my shame I did just this a very long time ago. The pain was absolutely excruciating and it didn't go away for a long time. I was very lucky and escaped any permanent disability but it might have been different. If you are a machinist on anything other than a watchmaking scale there is simply no sane reason not to wear proper boots.

mattinker
11-26-2012, 08:41 AM
Hmm, Andy, I hope you continue to not drop things on your feet! I wear steel toe capped boots all the time. I've been saved uncountable little "impacts" like only yesterday, a supermarket "cart". I wear them when riding my motorcycle, twice in twenty years in dense slow moving traffic I've had cars drive over the edge of my foot! Nothing broken. The marks on my boots are an indication of how much they've saved me.

Wouldn't be without them, they are no colder than ordinary boots or shoes I'm so used to them that my feet feel naked without them!

Regards, Matthew

Willy
11-26-2012, 09:02 AM
Just like any other piece of mandated safety gear, whether it be hard hats, safety goggles, seat belts, high vis vests, boots or what have you, somebody will have a personal anecdote of how somebodies second cousin hates them and why.

As always there may be the rare occasion when things don't go as planned, but in the vast majority of cases these safety measures have been responsible for allowing more workers to remain on the job until retirement than if these safety measures weren't implemented. Just look at the injuries and deaths in third world countries if you like the alternative.

True, over the forty five years of having worn steel toed boots I too have had days when I had issues like cold feet from certain boots, but looking back I can safely say that I would definitely not have all of my toes if they had not been forced on me.

A set of Hush Puppies just won't cut it in an industrial environment.
The guys here that work in these situations occasionally may get away with it but you are playing a numbers game. The higher your hours of exposure, they sooner your odds are of coming out hurt.

Willy
11-26-2012, 09:13 AM
Hmm, Andy, I hope you continue to not drop things on your feet! .........
.............

Yes and make damn sure everyone you work with is as cognizant of you feet as you are!
Bad enough that you have to be fully aware of what's going on around your toes at all times because you choose not to wear protective footware, just don't expect everyone else to be so concerned about your well being.

fjk
11-26-2012, 09:24 AM
I recently had a highly respected machinist...

If a "highly respected" safety expert (with no obvious machining expertise) told you how to cut a thread, would you listen?


p.s. I don't wear steel toed boots in my basement shop --- nothing big enough to cause serious injury there, but when I'm cutting trees, splitting wood, etc ... he.. yes. And I like Timberland Pro 8" high ankle boots ... Fairly cheap when ordered on line (last was something like $110 a pair), are not too heavy, and fairly warm. They are not waterproof, but a good dose of silicone waterproofing spray every year does the trick

garagemark
11-26-2012, 09:24 AM
I just don't drop things on my feet.

You have got to be kidding.

I just don't drop things on my feet either..... intentionally. I also don't roll things across my feet.... intentionally. I also don't kick things in tight places.... intentionally. All of which have happened at one time or another in my 30 odd years of heavy industrial work and heavy hobby work at home. I don't know how seriously injured I might have been without steel toes, but I was never injured with them.

As far as liability, there can probably be little to none, unless some manufacturer willfully made a defective product. All heavy work carries some risk. And PPE (personal protective equipment) can only aid in injury prevention; it cannot prevent it altogether. As long as an "employer" takes practical steps to require or provide PPE to protect an employee, that part of the liability is usually covered. Willful actions are more likely to cause liability issues than PPE.

vpt
11-26-2012, 09:27 AM
I work alone.

Not sure about other country locations exactly. When you guys say your feet don't get cold what exactly are the temperatures your seeing? Around here your feet can freeze in 1000 grain thinsulate sorrel boots. -0f and lower is very common around here. Frostbite hurts!

Now I'm not saying they aren't a good idea especially if your an accident prone person. Bad stuff normally doesn't happen to me because I am fully aware of what is going on around me all the time. I take my time with things and if something starts to fall I don't stick my foot under it unless it is a wrench or light enough tool that I know won't hurt me.

Like Willy mentioned there is no limit to safety. if your gonna preach to wear steel toed boots you may as well go all out with the harnesses, helmets, knee and elbow pads, vests, shin guards, chain mail gloves, and on and on.

H8Allegheny
11-26-2012, 09:40 AM
When I was in high school, I saw a guy have his toes cut off by the steel cap of his boot. Of course he had the end of his boot run over by a railroad hopper car full of ballast - having 20 or 30 TONS on top of your toes, no matter what you are wearing, is not going to end well.

John Stevenson
11-26-2012, 09:47 AM
Always worn steel toe cap boots for work.
For years I wore lace up commonly known round here as pit boots, cheap cheerful and worked.
best to get two pairs and keep swapping and then they don't affect your feet as much having the change.

Few years ago a guy gave me a pair of rigger boots as he was given them by work but didn't use them.
Just put them on one side as over here they are a source of derision, usual comment is having Rigger boots surgically removed.

Well one day my lace up split and it was the last pair so dragged the rigger boots out until I could get to buy some more boots.
After a couple of days I really got used to these, easy to slip on and off, warm in winter and cool in summer [ don't know how ? ]

Now won't wear anything else. If I pop into the shop at night to pick something up with trainers on I feel naked which is no bad thing.

Had one accident with steel toecaps when a big truck gearbox fell off a low bench, jumped back but it caught my toe cap, enough to bend it in, didn't actually trap anything but the end of my foot was badly bruised.

One reason why I still insist on wearing these type of boot.

garagemark
11-26-2012, 09:50 AM
if your gonna preach to wear steel toed boots you may as well go all out with the harnesses, helmets, knee and elbow pads, vests, shin guards, chain mail gloves, and on and on.

Yeah, we do that. Arc rated clothing, arc rated harnesses, Kevlar gloves, etc... The real liability comes, at least on large industrial sites, when you don't provide just about everything safety you can think of. And true, I find some of it borderline on ridiculous. But when a company lawyer is sitting in a courtroom across from a guy who did something stupid and got hurt, he simply says "we provided him equipment to prevent this injury, and trained him to use it. But he was not using it.".

Happens all the time.

fjk
11-26-2012, 10:09 AM
Not sure about other country locations exactly. When you guys say your feet don't get cold what exactly are the temperatures your seeing? Around here your feet can freeze in 1000 grain thinsulate sorrel boots. -0f and lower is very common around here. Frostbite hurts!


I said I found my Timberlands fairly warm --- In winter I mostly use them in the Peoples Republic of Massachusetts, suburban Boston. They are fine for 3-4 hours of shovelling snow off the driveway and that sort of thing (typically in the 0f-30f temp range). My day job is in an office, so they don't see 8-10-12 hours of outside work.

Frank

mayfieldtm
11-26-2012, 10:29 AM
Seems like the only times I drop anything on my foot is when I'm NOT wearing my Steel Toe Boots!

My big brother shocked the willies out of me so that I would know what electricty can do.
So I dropped a sledge hammer on his foot so that he would know what little brothers can do.
Kinda felt bad about it.

Tom M.

saltmine
11-26-2012, 12:08 PM
I've worn steel toe boots for most of my 45 years working on cars and as a welder & machinist. I suppose it's true. Once you get used to them, it doesn't make any difference. Besides, OSHA required them on most job-sites....After retiring, and putting away my last pair of steel toe work shoes (almost new), I've managed to break three toes in five years....retirement is rough.

EddyCurr
11-26-2012, 12:49 PM
For those that wear redwings, what model do you prefer.I wear the Red Wing D 3507 - 6" Boot (http://www.redwingsafety.com/safety-boot/3507-safe-us/3507-red-wing-mens-6-inch-boot-black).

This model fits to US 15 (UK 14, EUR 49.0) in a D, they also have it in B, EE & H widths.

Unlike early the days, Red Wing now offer a wide selection of styles, finishes and features.

Where you are not required to buy to a certain standard for employment, giving some thought
to the actual level of protection required might result in a choice that improves comfort in a
trade-off of protection from a non-existant (for your intended usage) danger.

There are several other choices for protective footwear. I selected RW because of they offer
large sizes in suitable styles and there are well-stocked local retailers where I can try fitment
before buying.

EddyCurr
11-26-2012, 01:25 PM
... a few months ago I decided I was tired of tying bootlaces so I bought a pair of Blundstones (http://www.blundstone.ca/csa.html).
... with a long shoehorn I don't even have to bend over to put them on...I notice Mellow Walk (www.mellowwalk.com) is another vendor in the steel toe comfort safety shoe segment.

However, I find there are occasions where I go to the shop for a few minutes
and I want to be able to effortlessly swap from house to shop footwear and
back again.

What I want is a heel-less slip-on with a protective toe - sort of like a safety
clog, but without the tall wooden sole.

EddyCurr
11-26-2012, 01:44 PM
What I want is a heel-less slip-on with a protective toe
- sort of like a safety clog, but without the tall wooden sole.Like this one intended for Chefs (only in a larger size):


SIKA Steel Toe Safety Shoes, Open Back, Style 895 (http://sikafootwear.com/products/On-Sale/SIKA-Steel-Toe-Safety-Shoes-Open-Back-Style-895-895)

Edit:

Well, Shazam !

Turns out that Sika says the steel toe open back shoes fit one size larger.
- Plus, prices on the CDN site are slightly less (exchange rts).
- Plus, there is a 20% discount and free shipping today for Cyber Monday.
- Best of all, there is stock in my size.

Works for me.

Just ordered a pair of the Style 895 (calf flex sole.) For traditionalists, there
is also the Style 54 Birchwood Steel Toe Open Back (birchwood sole).

SGW
11-26-2012, 03:27 PM
The guy reminds me of my uncle who wouldn't wear a seatbelt because he wanted to be able to get out in case there was a fire. Never mind telling him that if there was an accident and a fire, with a seatbelt he would have a much better chance of not being hurt so badly he couldn't get out.

He was in a head-on collision and killed when he hit the steering wheel and crushed his chest.

One can always think up a scenario when a seatbelt could be a liability, or when steel-toed boots could be a liability, but the odds strongly favor the use of both.

mike4
11-26-2012, 04:52 PM
I only wear lace up high ankle steel toed boots , I have worn the slipon types and forund that many didnt give any form of ankle support ,also its cheaper to replace a set of laces than a pair of boots if they have ti be cut off .
The Jogger style that some here have a preference for will get you kicked off a lot of sites unless you are a rigger or plimber working on a roof or similar .
The fallacy that steel toes boots are uncomfortable is total BS as like others here I have worn some type of steel toed boot for over forty years and always purchased ones that were good fitting and I also wear heavy socks , often for eighteen hours a day, they are comfortable to drive ,operate machinery and be on my feet for extended periods.
I still have all toes and only once have had a broken bone when a beam rolled over and landed across the top of my foot , six weeks off work .
But the heavy leather upper prevented any cuts.
I will always make it mandatory for the necessary PPE to be worn at all times when working ,complaints about what it looks like or the gear is too hot will always be given the same reply ,"wear the PPE or leave" from me .
Work is not always meant to be comfortable or a fashion extravaganza, if you dont like getting dirty or hot and sweaty find a different occupation.
Michael

Peter.
11-26-2012, 05:01 PM
I put the foot of a Brokk 250 on my boot once. The toecap didn't fail, it sank into the sole a bit and trapped my toes. It hurt like hell but if it wasn't for the toecap I would probably be asking for 'one platform shoe' as a present each Christmas.

coalsmok
11-26-2012, 05:18 PM
i wear my steel toes pretty much seven days a week. They are required on the job and I farm on the side. A big cow will make you a beliver in steel toe boots fast if you have to get up close and personal with her in a tight spot. To me they are just as comfortable as my other shoes.

Guido
11-26-2012, 06:26 PM
SHET happens--------

http://i126.photobucket.com/albums/p86/Guido_album/100_1065.jpg

--G

GT1
11-26-2012, 06:53 PM
Forty years ago when I worked at the airport as a baggage handler, my foot was run over by a tug. My steel toed boots did their job and I have worn them ever since. My last four sets have been Wolverines, and I have found them to be comfortable. The last set were with the composite guards. I found them to be much lighter.

loply
11-26-2012, 06:55 PM
I remember walking into a motorbike accessory shop and the bloke behind the counter eyed me up and said 'Are they steel toed boots? You'd be better off with trainers mate, at least trainers will come off if you have an accident...'

I was literally speechless, I can't to this day comprehend what situation he was imagining whereby bare naked feet are better against abrasive tarmac and car tires than a pair of thick leather/steel boots. Words didn't reach my mouth. Now that I remember it I feel like going back just in case he's still there.

There are some true morons in the world and the OP may have met one of them.

vpt
11-26-2012, 07:46 PM
Bunch of clumsy bastards in this thread. :P

Dr Stan
11-26-2012, 08:38 PM
Bunch of clumsy bastards in this thread. :P

Yep and we all have our toes. :)

me included

BigMike782
11-26-2012, 09:23 PM
I have to wear boots with caps and full metatarsal covers.I have 6E wide feet and had to have custom boots made.The caps are supposed to be steel but there are none made wide enough for my feet so I have composites.Prior this job I had no reason to wear STBs and wore H Redwings.....a pair would last about 6 months before I had the sides blown out I now wear my boots almost exclusively they are like wearing slippers.

sophijo
11-26-2012, 10:14 PM
Mike...where are you boots made?
Dave

11 Bravo
11-27-2012, 12:54 AM
I work alone.

Not sure about other country locations exactly. When you guys say your feet don't get cold what exactly are the temperatures your seeing? Around here your feet can freeze in 1000 grain thinsulate sorrel boots. -0f and lower is very common around here. Frostbite hurts!................................

I worked in field service on large mining machines for almost 20 years before going into the natural gas compression industry. I have worked in the mountains of Colorado, in Idaho, Utah, Northern Nevada and Wyoming. 0 degrees F is very common. 20 below is not uncommon. If you get boots that fit properly, get 2 pairs and rotate them so they can dry completely, wear good socks and change them out a couple of times a day you won't have any problems. If it is real cold I wear 5 buckle overshoes over my work boots. Of course, in weather that cold you end up taking warm up breaks a few times a day anyway. I honestly have more trouble keeping my hands warm than my feet. Like someone else here posted, the notion that steel toe boots are colder than other boots is BS.

Make fun of safety equipment all you want. Of course you still need to use good sense, and sometimes PPE can be required at a level that seems overkill, but I have had the stuff save my butt a few times and I know guys who I fully believe the stuff saved their lives.

11 Bravo
11-27-2012, 12:57 AM
For those that wear redwings, what model do you prefer. I've never even tried on redwings, but everybody seems to love 'em. I've got a few that look good to me, but won't get to try any on for a while.

Model 4418 are the ones I like. Brown logger with the red quilted lining. I wear them winter and summer. Great boots.

These are the ones:

http://www.redwingsafety.com/safety-boot/4418-safe-us/4418-red-wing-mens-8-inch-logger-boot-brown

BigMike782
11-27-2012, 11:18 AM
Mike...where are you boots made?
Dave
http://www.grundmanshoe.com/

thaiguzzi
11-27-2012, 10:14 PM
What's wrong with flip flops? Hot swarf between the toes makes a real man.
Mike
NE Thailand.

Dr Stan
11-27-2012, 10:25 PM
What's wrong with flip flops? Hot swarf between the toes makes a real man.
Mike
NE Thailand.

You could just run around bare footed like they do in foundries in India. :eek:

spope14
11-30-2012, 09:38 PM
A kurt vise coming off a machine and a person running into my elbow was enough for me to appreciate steel toe boots. All I had to do was stone the vise, my toes were just fine. I do not wear a brand name boot, found a pair at good old Wally world that was really comfortable, have been wearing them three years now. Second pair for the house. Stubbing the toes on a hard machine base is also good enough to warrant their use. The machine base does not move, neither do the steel toes.

John Stevenson
12-01-2012, 05:27 AM
If I go back into the shop late at night for the odd thing in trainers I feel naked and uncomfortable.

I put this down to many years ago i was fitting a Blackburn engine into a Cotton from to make a grass track racer [ not mine ] This engine had never been fitted to this frame so mew plates were needed.
I leant the bike up against a set of drawers and stood the engine on bricks and blocks of wood to get it in the right position and then cut some cardboard templates out for the engine plate which I was going to cut out at work the following day.

Knocked off for the hight, locked up and went and got some tea.

Later on realised I wanted something out the shop so nipped in, wearing slippers, pulled the frame towards me to get in the top drawer and the bloody engine fell on my foot.

I can remember saying something like "Oh golly gosh " or similar in a loud voice.
The toe next to my big toe was broken in one maybe two places and made a brilliant impression of a flat ended screwdriver.

Gert wanted to take me to the A&E but it's a waste of time, they can't do anything for a toe so I got here to bind it to the big toe with masking tape, big believer in surgical masking tape.

Only good thing about that episode was it healed quickly as the next day, middle of winter this was, I got called out to an artic that had jackknifed and run of the road and was sitting in 3' of snow. Unfortunately when it jackknifed it ripped all the air valves off the upright behind the cab.

I spent about 3 hours repairing pipework and bypassing valves so we would have some brakes for the trip back, by then my feet were that frozen i couldn't feel the broken toe

philbur
12-01-2012, 06:44 AM
Ask him what he knows about probability theory.

10 minutes from now an unknown object is going to apply an unknown force to the end of your shoe. Heres' a pair of steel toe-capped shoes and and here's a pair of ordinary work shoes. Choose which pair you want to be wearing 10 minutes from now.

Phil:)


.... I recently had a highly respected machinist say to me that he'd rather have crushed toes than pinched off toes...or something like that....

AD5MB
12-01-2012, 09:54 AM
all other considerations aside: it is downright painful to shift a Harley with soft toes. the steel toes get you past the stiffness of the shifter.

vpt
12-01-2012, 10:26 AM
all other considerations aside: it is downright painful to shift a Harley with soft toes. the steel toes get you past the stiffness of the shifter.

Get a double paddle shifter.

I am amazed how many people just drop things on their feet in here. Is it because you guys wear steel toes that you quit worrying where your feet are or what falls on them?

John Stevenson
12-01-2012, 10:35 AM
I am amazed how many people just drop things on their feet in here.

OK point taken.



Clumsy bastards.....................

Jaakko Fagerlund
12-01-2012, 10:46 AM
Ask him what he knows about probability theory.
..or if he knows this one guy, I think Murphy was his name ;)

Jaakko Fagerlund
12-01-2012, 10:47 AM
I am amazed how many people just drop things on their feet in here. Is it because you guys wear steel toes that you quit worrying where your feet are or what falls on them?
Yes, I intentionally cause accidents.

Richard King
12-01-2012, 11:08 AM
A month ago I bought a pair of steel toe'd boots and work shoes at a Red-Wing store in St. Paul MN. Both pair were made in China. I was told that the toe covering is not steel anymore and its made from a carbon based material and stronger then steel. The salesman said they still call it "Steel Toe'd" because that's what it's been referred to for years. They were expensive. $199.00 for the boots and $149.00 for the shoe's. I also bought the foot pad insert they sell that you warm up in an oven and then slide it in the shoe and stand on it. It forms to the foot and really makes it comfortable. The lifetime warranty is nice too.

Willy
12-01-2012, 12:59 PM
........
I am amazed how many people just drop things on their feet in here. Is it because you guys wear steel toes that you quit worrying where your feet are or what falls on them?

No it's because in the real world you don't have total control of what's going on around you. Whether it's working with livestock, by yourself, or working with twenty five guys on a construction site...sh!t happens.

The same reason most people buy house insurance, they aren't planning on having a fire (well at least most anyway) but it's nice when the policy is there after the fact.

I could go on with countless other example where people don't intentionally plan on getting hurt but take precautions to avoid or lessen their injuries.

No one is in total control at all times of his surroundings or actions.