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View Full Version : Tons and tons of antique iron



Luke55
12-08-2012, 09:55 AM
http://urbanindiana.com/in_mauzy/in_mauzy.html

Tony Ennis
12-08-2012, 10:22 AM
That's a hell of a lathe, just before the D-9 Cat picture. Still has a 4-jaw, carriage, and a tailstock!

Dr Stan
12-08-2012, 10:35 AM
not too far from me. Should plan to visit in the summer.

becksmachine
12-08-2012, 10:56 AM
Hmm, I think I resemble that. :o

It is probably a good thing that I am no closer to it than I am.

Dave

Grind Hard
12-08-2012, 11:29 AM
There are people who have gone to great pains to keep old steam traction engines running.

This fellow has dozens of them, mostly intact but rusted solid.

What I wouldn't give for just ONE, to restore to static-display standards.

1-800miner
12-08-2012, 12:27 PM
The photography is just as incredible as the content.

Guido
12-08-2012, 12:52 PM
Two or three day's of hands-on inspection of the collection should be a requirement for any ME prior to graduation. Every principal of mechanics, hydraulics, electrics, thermo----can be reviewed. Even the chemistry of rust, and the art of black/white/color photography, and business economics, and, and, and-----------.

--G

Paul Alciatore
12-08-2012, 01:52 PM
When I see something like that I have an urge to hire a crop duster and have him spray the whole thing with Rust-Oleum. I mean, why do people collect these things and then just let them rust? I don't understand.

Grind Hard
12-08-2012, 02:04 PM
I mean, why do people collect these things and then just let them rust? I don't understand.

Exactly what I was wondering. Either restore them and pass them on/display them properly, let them go to someone who can, or (and I hate to say it) sell the lot for scrap.

Lot of decent radioactivity free steel and iron in that lot, sold to the right scrapper it could net a fair amount of coin.

Mcgyver
12-08-2012, 03:30 PM
I mean, why do people collect these things and then just let them rust? I don't understand.

agreed, probably no net damage to posterity though; it was probably him or the scrapper. He's not making them better or even slowing down the entropy.....and unless he gets busy i doubt he'll get them all restored. Not too much of a stretch to say its the same mental illness you see on that show "hoarders"....although more benign in that its the back 40 rather than the house

Weekend_Scientist
12-08-2012, 03:34 PM
Lot of decent radioactivity free steel and iron in that lot, sold to the right scrapper it could net a fair amount of coin.


I'm curious. Not about the radioactivity per se. I used to work at a cyclotron so I'm no stranger to radiation but how does it make its way into modern steel? Does it come in as thorium with the rare earth elements that are added to certain types of steel?

What are some applications where you would want "radioactivity free steel"?

Nice pics of the old iron by the way.

The Artful Bodger
12-08-2012, 05:20 PM
If I understand correctly all steels made since the dawn of the atomic age have plutonium contamination from the air used in the blast furnaces.

Grind Hard
12-08-2012, 05:26 PM
Radioactive sources get mixed into metal all the time, low-level items from nuclear sources get recycled... Things of that nature. Most steel since 1948 has been found to be mildly radioactive to one degree or another. Its typically low enough levels that it won't harm you... but there are applications where even that slight "taint" from recycled power plant parts or accidental contamination from missed sources could be an issue.

Radioactivity free steel would be used in an application such as the framework for a particle accelerator target, or labware used in applications where stray emissions could influence results.



Interesting to note... the power plant back east of me Ginna Station underwent a steam-generator replacement back in the 90s. The worn out SG units were stored in a vault on the plant site, apparently despite their radioactivity several companies bid on salvaging the special tube-steel alloy. They have to wait X number of years for the radiation to die back (think I was told 25 years) then they can come and get them and melt 'em down.

oxford
12-08-2012, 05:52 PM
There are people who have gone to great pains to keep old steam traction engines running.

This fellow has dozens of them, mostly intact but rusted solid.

What I wouldn't give for just ONE, to restore to static-display standards.

There is a steam and engine show local to me that they do a few times a year. They have a big steam tractor there that they get out and run the saw mill with. I remember it when I was a small kid, but it is cool to still see it working when I go there.

oldtiffie
12-08-2012, 06:22 PM
Apparently the author saw this first about 40 years ago. It seems that there is a lot more evidence of hoarding than there is of restoration. There was no mention of any of it having been sold either.

If that's the case assuming that the owner will keep it until he dies and will not be maintaining any (or not much anyway) it seems that his inheritors or his executor are going to have quite job clearing it out.

The sale catalogue will be interesting.

My guess is that when it is sold some will go the enthusiasts and what is left will be left for a low bid by the scrappers.

I wonder what would happen if some here who enthuse about a particular item were to be given to them "as is" to remove in say 30 days.

It will be even more interesting to see how much the new owners get done as regards restoration or will it be a case of moving it from one junk heap to another and then to the scrappers.

I was impressed at how well the grass was cut in those pics.

Fasttrack
12-08-2012, 07:40 PM
Radioactivity free steel would be used in an application such as the framework for a particle accelerator target, or labware used in applications where stray emissions could influence results.

A target? Why?

Radioactive free metals are important for low level detectors and radiation shielding of other sensitive equipment. For instance, I know of a cosmic ray detector group at the University of Chicago that purchased lead salvaged from a freight ship that sank in the early 1800s, IIRC. It was old enough that the naturally occurring radioactive isotopes had already decayed. This "low alpha lead" is important for shielding sensitive detectors.

Grind Hard
12-08-2012, 07:44 PM
I meant detector. Thank you Fasttrack.

Bobrenz
12-08-2012, 07:56 PM
If you ever plan to restore an old steam traction engine, check with your state boiler inspector first. Around here, some of the restorers had been trying to get approval for their restored engines, except with a single lap riveted joint in the boiler barrel, they are condemned for anything over 15 PSIG. If it has a double butt strap joint with 4 rows of rivets, you are in better shape with the inspectors. Also, at least one restorer was caught filling in rusted pits on the boiler shell with bondo - also a no-no.

kf2qd
12-08-2012, 08:54 PM
The reason folks have stuff like this is because at some point it got to where it wasn't worth anything and they stashed it out it the back 40 for "someday" and that someday never arrives. What it would take now is for someone to have a way of funding some restoration and storage to preserve it for the future. Remember - the reason why that stuff is there is because at some point it was just junk...

oldtiffie
12-09-2012, 05:18 AM
And to a large extent it is or will be - then the scrappers.

History repeating itself.

I rather think that despite (or because of?) all weeping, wailing, gnashing of teeth etc. as well as fervent praying and wringing of hands and entreaties for someone else (no surprises here) to "do something" - when ever - that not much in total will be done in terms of complete restorations.

_Paul_
12-09-2012, 06:10 AM
Even if only a small percentage of the gentleman's fantastic collection gets restored surely thats better than where it would have ended up perhaps as Baked bean tins on the shelves of Wall-Mart/Asda.

_Paul_

tdmidget
12-09-2012, 09:02 AM
Since the photos are dated 2007, what makes you think any of it is still there after 5 years of the highest scrap prices in history?

Forestgnome
12-09-2012, 11:41 AM
When I see something like that I have an urge to hire a crop duster and have him spray the whole thing with Rust-Oleum. I mean, why do people collect these things and then just let them rust? I don't understand.
It's called patina! For the most part rust doesn't have too much effect on iron that heavy. My dozer sits outside all year long and I don't worry much about the rust.

Fasttrack
12-09-2012, 12:45 PM
Since the photos are dated 2007, what makes you think any of it is still there after 5 years of the highest scrap prices in history?

Highest in history?

The highest in history was 1974 once you account for inflation of the US dollar. It's high right now, but not the highest in history.

http://minerals.usgs.gov/ds/2005/140/ds140-fescr.pdf

wierdscience
12-09-2012, 04:09 PM
Geez you guys missed the Camel Back drillpress and the Oliver 14 variety saw:D

He's got quite a collection that's for sure.I would love to have one of those portable engines or the two old Holt tractors to restore.

oldtiffie
12-09-2012, 06:30 PM
As the owner seems reluctant (or "just won't"?) sell in his lifetime all the enthusiasts here primed with the necessary folding stuff may just have to wait until the Executors auction/sale and compete with any other bidders - unless the executor sells it all as a job lot to the scrappers who may have to tidy the place up as part of the sale.

If the owner lives to a ripe old age some of the enthusiasm might have abated somewhat as time and old age catch up with the "restorers".

Perhaps if some here do eventually buy some of that "good stuff" it may well be that their executors sell it for whatever they can get - and if it isn't sold the scrappers will get it anyway.

jdunmyer
12-09-2012, 07:12 PM
Probably 20 years ago, there was a similar "collection" of old tractors and a bit of associated equipment sitting at a place right along I-75, near Monroe, MI. I'd bet that several people stopped there every week, bothering the owner. Then, one day, there appeared an auction sale bill in the local paper, and it was all gone in a week or so.

This collection will probably be the same.

Peter S
12-09-2012, 07:20 PM
Re. the interesting old bucket-chain trencher some way down the page....can anyone make out the makers name on the engine? It looks a bit like The Automatic Machine Company....and I can't read the address (and I'm not sure about the name either). I think it needs someone with Photoshop or similar skills to decode it!

I can't figure out how to post the image here via Photobucket, I think the images may have some protection embedded.

Thanks for any help!

Peter

oldtiffie
12-09-2012, 07:41 PM
Re. the interesting old bucket-chain trencher some way down the page....can anyone make out the makers name on the engine? It looks a bit like The Automatic Machine Company....and I can't read the address (and I'm not sure about the name either). I think it needs someone with Photoshop or similar skills to decode it!

I can't figure out how to post the image here via Photobucket, I think the images may have some protection embedded.

Thanks for any help!


Peter

Any help?


http://urbanindiana.com/in_mauzy/20070429-049.jpg

http://urbanindiana.com/in_mauzy/20070429-050.jpg

http://urbanindiana.com/in_mauzy/20070429-051.jpg

Peter S
12-10-2012, 05:02 AM
Any help?

OT,

Yes! Thanks very much. That's the machine.

http://urbanindiana.com/in_mauzy/20070429-051.jpg