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John Stevenson
12-14-2012, 06:20 PM
Well had to shoot out this morning straight from home and didn't get back until 1:30 and this was waiting for me on the yard.

http://www.stevenson-engineers.co.uk/files/woodstove1.jpg

The bit covered with the blue tarp. Big pallet 5' x 5' x 8' full of hardwood offcuts from the local furniture place, free of charge and delivered free.




Fired up Lucifer the wood burning stove.




http://www.stevenson-engineers.co.uk/files/woodstove2.jpg




And this is the result 2 hours later.




http://www.stevenson-engineers.co.uk/files/woodstove3.jpg




Bear in mind this is heating two shops, other shop is too far away to get any decent heat and that's only got a couple of machines, all the welding gear and about 4 tonnes of steel stock.




Luverly jubbly.

Grind Hard
12-14-2012, 06:22 PM
Old wood-stoves are fascinating. What can you tell us about Lucifer?

flylo
12-14-2012, 06:45 PM
Nothing better than wood heat to keep your brass warm!

MrFluffy
12-14-2012, 07:08 PM
I fired up our wood furnace tonight and had a nice tipple with evening meal and forgot to start the circulating pumps. Remembers about the fourth drinkie in, and rushes into the utility and the gauge is on 130c and its kettling out the security valves! It holds 600L of water in the furnace alone, so thats quite some energy thing going on...
Circulators on, its back down to 100 within 20 mins of the pumps on and the dampers closed while we all hide in the next room hoping it calms down :)
I'm going to have to automate that bit, its obvious the single heatsink radiator that circulates by thermosyphon to stop this sort of thing isn't man enough for the job...
Wood, brilliant heat output. Got to be careful you don't get too much though...

sasquatch
12-14-2012, 07:26 PM
I've burnt wood for heat for 40 years, wouldn't be without it!!

My shop is in my basement with an outside entrance, if the power goes out, i can wait, i can still be warm, cook food, dry my clothes, heat water, etc and still be nice and warm regaedless of the cold temps outside. Don't have a "Rusting" problem either.

KiddZimaHater
12-14-2012, 09:25 PM
I'm glad I live in the tropics, and don't have to worry about that 'heating' stuff.
72 F (22 C) today in San Antonio.

cameron
12-14-2012, 11:01 PM
That good weather must get awful tiresome after a while.

Mike Burdick
12-14-2012, 11:21 PM
Fess up ... how much "stuff" did you have to move in order to find the stove?

herbet999
12-15-2012, 12:14 AM
I hope you don't need to use any of that bar stock behind the stove. Might be a bit hot to handle

mike4
12-15-2012, 04:41 AM
Those are being annealed by the time he gets to them they will machine like butter.
Michael

+ or - Zero
12-15-2012, 04:58 AM
I fired up our wood furnace tonight and had a nice tipple with evening meal and forgot to start the circulating pumps. Remembers about the fourth drinkie in, and rushes into the utility and the gauge is on 130c and its kettling out the security valves! It holds 600L of water in the furnace alone, so thats quite some energy thing going on...
Circulators on, its back down to 100 within 20 mins of the pumps on and the dampers closed while we all hide in the next room hoping it calms down :)
I'm going to have to automate that bit, its obvious the single heatsink radiator that circulates by thermosyphon to stop this sort of thing isn't man enough for the job...
Wood, brilliant heat output. Got to be careful you don't get too much though...

It's not too much wood, it's too much drinkie... still, automation seems like an excellent idea --drinkie or no. :rolleyes:

Paul Alciatore
12-15-2012, 05:08 AM
Oh gosh, and I am just finishing the installation of a AC unit with heat for my garage/shop. Winters are mild here on the Gulf Coast so it should keep me nice and toasty until spring.

Black Forest
12-15-2012, 01:07 PM
Firewood! I gave my 10 year old daughter a tract of forest to manage so when she turns eighteen she will have enough money to buy a car or finance her college, etc.. She is doing all the management regarding wood harvesting no matter what class of wood. She is doing spreadsheets for all the costs and growth expectations, etc.. To the point, I told her I was going to put wood heating in my "new" shop. She just smiles at me and tells me that she will give me a discount on my firewood! Gotta love kids.

bborr01
12-15-2012, 01:26 PM
John,

Did you build the wood stove?

Brian

Peter.
12-15-2012, 01:50 PM
Firewood! I gave my 10 year old daughter a tract of forest to manage so when she turns eighteen she will have enough money to buy a car or finance her college, etc.. She is doing all the management regarding wood harvesting no matter what class of wood. She is doing spreadsheets for all the costs and growth expectations, etc.. To the point, I told her I was going to put wood heating in my "new" shop. She just smiles at me and tells me that she will give me a discount on my firewood! Gotta love kids.

I didn't realise there was any money to be made from a stretch of woodland, short of cutting it down and selling it for Crimbo trees :D

Black Forest
12-15-2012, 02:09 PM
I didn't realise there was any money to be made from a stretch of woodland, short of cutting it down and selling it for Crimbo trees :D

I hope that was meant as a joke because if not you are very misinformed!

davidwdyer
12-15-2012, 02:14 PM
I just don't understand all this concern from you guys about heating the shop.

My problem has always been cooling in the summer. :)

Grind Hard
12-15-2012, 02:26 PM
I hope that was meant as a joke because if not you are very misinformed!

My uncle and my grandfather managed 32 acres in Lisbon CT for a very long time before selling it as parkland. I found out afterwards from going through estate records that by just selling specific trees at certain points they were able supplement their retirements quite nicely, some of those really old well-preserved hardwood trees can fetch some serious money.

I remember spending summers helping keep the gypsy-moth larva under control and learning the difference between gypsy-moth and other species of butterfly and moth.

I never picked up much of the "tree" stuff besides learning how to identify oak, maple, birch and so on. To me, wood is wood and I leave the wood-working arts to the masters.

walyo
12-15-2012, 03:25 PM
On the same subject.http://i1297.photobucket.com/albums/ag27/walyo1/Image1292.jpghttp://i1297.photobucket.com/albums/ag27/walyo1/Image1311.jpg

bborr01
12-15-2012, 03:50 PM
On the same subject.http://i1297.photobucket.com/albums/ag27/walyo1/Image1292.jpghttp://i1297.photobucket.com/albums/ag27/walyo1/Image1311.jpg

Waste oil furnace?

jdunmyer
12-15-2012, 04:07 PM
Used this for about 15 years: (note the solenoid on the door)

http://www.oldengine.org/members/jdunmyer/personal/stove/dec23_10.jpg

controlled by this:

http://www.oldengine.org/members/jdunmyer/personal/stove/dec23_05.jpg

Now have a gas furnace. Not sure if it's an improvement, but it sure is easier!

full story on the stove is here: http://www.oldengine.org/members/jdunmyer/personal/stove/

John Stevenson
12-15-2012, 08:16 PM
John,

Did you build the wood stove?

Brian


No but finished it off as it wasn't quite finished.

The stove was designed by Arthur a local character. See this post for an introduction to Arthur.

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/threads/47408

Anyway before the hovercraft experience one of Arthur's mates buys a stove that is supposed to burn sawdust, it does but takes ages and give off hardly any heat.

So Arthur decides to built a stove that burns sawdust and requires no fans or outside sources, after the Mk 2345 he get it sussed but in the meanwhile he's attracted some interest from the International red cross for a stove that can run on brush wood twigs etc for emerging countries to boil water for sterilising etc, so my stove was born.

It got virtually finished and they lost touch so it stood in a corner, I tried to buy it a few times but he wouldn't sell saying it belonged the Red Cross. So one day I asked how much the Red Cross had paid and it turned out that all he had was a promise they would buy it so I managed to get him to sell it me. Think I paid £250 with some spare plates [ more later ]

The way it works is the 4 legs at each corner are --i___i-- shaped and bolted to the octagonal wrapper but there is a gap in the wrapper where the legs fit so ait can enter the stove thru a top to bottom slit.

Bolted over this slit inside are 4 louvre plates made of cast iron with louvres in that point down. These only lasted 2 years before they cracked and broke up with the expansion and contraction, the replacements were made out of steel with some 'U' s cut in with a lser and bet into louvres.

Originally there was a centre box open at the bottom with a louvre plate on all 4 sides. After this broke up thru cracking it was removed and the bottom square hole blanked off as it works fine with just the corner louvres.

In use you load it up with a big bag of sawdust from those industrial dust extractors, level it off and start a fire in all 4 corners with a bit of paper. it starts off slow and then get going. When you look in you can see 4 separate like whirlwinds rotating just above the sawdust in the corners and they roar.

What I think happens is that as the wood burns it generates wood gas in the layer below which gets sucked out of the louvres and into the leg where being hotter it rises and comes out the upper louvres where it burns. It takes 4 hours to burn a bag.

For the last few years i haven't been able to get sawdust and shavings mixed which is what it likes, the horsey crowd buy all the spare shavings so i have been burning furniture wood offcuts.

No sweat though as our town is the furniture capital of the UK and scrap wood isn't a problem, you can even get it delivered if you take enough. Local to me must be over 20 factories making furniture and doing upholstery, all the skills in in this town.

If anyone wants more pictures or dimensions shout up.

Grind Hard
12-15-2012, 08:44 PM
Amazing. I'd love to see more of the stove, including any interior shots you can get.

Thanks!

Bobrenz
12-15-2012, 08:45 PM
The wood stove we had in the old shop was originally built to burn coal, so the walls were about 1.5" thick. We had so much infrared from it that we were getting worried about the shop's walls, so we bent up a 12 gauge galvanized sheet metal shield that wrapped about 2/3 of the way around the stove, and was spaced about 6" out from the sides. We'd sometimes dump in a 5 gallon bucket of Illinois coal, and within 1/2 hour or so, we'd have the doors open on the shop trying to cool the place down. The stovepipe damper adjustment was critical with coal.

A friend of mine has a propane unit heater that he uses to keep his shop at 50F, and a wood stove that he uses to get it comfortable. He found that when he just used the wood stove, it would get decent in the shop just about the time to go home. He added a small tank on top of the stove for his drain oil - he feeds it into the fire with a small petcock, one drop at a time.

sasquatch
12-15-2012, 09:29 PM
In Ontario dripping used oil or any oil, into a stove will be an automatic cancelation of your'e building and contents insurance.

John Stevenson
12-15-2012, 09:46 PM
Do some pics tomorrow as best I can, hard to gets shots inside.
Got some spare louvre plates, brand new, had about 16 cut but the first set are still OK 10 years on because the expansion and contraction is the same or close to the body of the stove.

One problem I do have is that every 4 years or so I have to rebolt the louvre plate / leg bolts and these pop of with expansion
It needs going next summer as I have lost about another 10 or 12 so far this winter, really should have been done start of winter but it crept up fast this year ;)

Mime can't burn coal there are no low vents.
Wood burns from the top down, coal burns from the bottom up and needs a grate which mine doesn't have.

MrFluffy
12-16-2012, 05:06 AM
Used this for about 15 years:
controlled by this:

http://www.oldengine.org/members/jdunmyer/personal/stove/dec23_05.jpg

Now have a gas furnace. Not sure if it's an improvement, but it sure is easier!

full story on the stove is here: http://www.oldengine.org/members/jdunmyer/personal/stove/
Thats really cool, on my previous house, the underfloor heating was ran by a old pentium laptop with a smashed display hooked up to a load of dallas ibutton temp sensors in a serial network round the house. For heat control in the ufh system, there was a relay box on the parallel port, bits of which matched up to zones in the house in software, and you could set per room and per time of day heat settings in some webgui that it stashed in a mysql database I rolled up and we programmed it and checked it via the house network...
Sounds like a lash up but its still running and controlling the house automated 7 years later, at the moment the property is empty so it's set low as a frost free watcher
I was thinking about doing something similar here but with a arduino controller + ethernet sheild to cut down on the wattage required 24/7 for the controls but still definitely want it to report status etc into the network, so I can get the furnace to ping my phone when it starts to run down on wood so I don't have to watch it :)

John, I have a photo somewhere of the fire in our hs tarm running at full chat, I think they work in similar fashion. You can see the glowing wood coals and flames, but no smoke as its all being sucked down to the bottom of the fire. Its surreal, I'll try and find it.

The principle behind inverted fire systems is that the wood is heated first by the fire at the bottom, which gives off wood gas, this is then drawn past the flames where it burns and gives the energy in the gas off also. The four cyclone aspect seems really really interesting.
Theres a lot of development to be done on wood technology and its been bypassed as its seen as "old" tech, but its come a long way from a fire inside a pile of stones to keep animals fended off..
I often idly wonder about a propane based ignition system with flame failure devices etc to stop it turning the furnace into a bomb. At the moment I light it with a roofers propane torch in through the lower access door till the fire takes hold and the draw gets going...

EVguru
12-16-2012, 05:37 AM
I've been looking at sawdust burners.

My big problem is condensation. We've just had a week or so of nights below freezing, with days not so far above. Everything with mass in the workshops 'cold soaks' and when we get a 10C jump in temperature like we did on Friday, I suddenly have a lot of humid air waiting to condense on everything. It used to be bad enough to cause puddles! These days I have a pair of dehumidifiers, which usually keep things under control, but this time they both iced up, despite having a defrost cycle. Running my 4.5Kw fan heater for a couple of hours kept things under control.

I probably need to sort out some machine heaters. These should ideally have a differential thermostat so they just try and keep the Iron a degree or two above ambient keeping the energy cost low.

If I can work out where to place a cheap/free to run sawdust burner then I can prevent the cold soaks, even if I don't feel like going out and working. I've been looking at these stoves; http://www.stovesonline.co.uk/wood_burning_stoves/Steel-workshop-stove.html

Peter.
12-16-2012, 05:58 AM
I hope that was meant as a joke because if not you are very misinformed!

It's no joke. If you don't know something - you don't know it. I never had cause to research it is all.

Black Forest
12-16-2012, 08:20 AM
It's no joke. If you don't know something - you don't know it. I never had cause to research it is all.


I thought you were telling me there is no money in timberland. There is a lot of money in timber. One tree can be worth thousands of Euros. My project with my daughter is structured so the timber is harvested for prolonged income from the forest. No clear cutting.

walyo
12-16-2012, 09:13 AM
Yes Brian, waste oil. It keeps the place nice and snug.
I was also able to create my first "V" spring with it recently.

Kevin

vpt
12-16-2012, 10:28 AM
I have been wanting to burn waste oil as well in my wood stove. However it is about 100 years old and has leaks everywhere. I've been watching for a newer one.

J Tiers
12-16-2012, 12:09 PM
I thought you were telling me there is no money in timberland. There is a lot of money in timber. One tree can be worth thousands of Euros.

Sure is.... A friend of mine has 5000 acres of woodland (owned with 2 bro and a sister) which for years they managed, had an on-site forester who did the work. Did fine, not a huge amount of money, but pretty decent. Paid taxes, wages, and made a good profit. Problem is that there is a lot of scrub growth, it's all hills. Not so many larger trees that are worth more.

Then the others got greedy and wanted to sell it for development...they figured to make millions.... Problem is most of the land goes either up or down (depending if you are at bottom or top) , and isn't "ideal" for building.........;) Before they figured that out they nixed the management idea and fired the forester. Next it was mining... it used to be a lead mine.... they were going to sell the mineral rights to a company that would dig it all up and supposedly pay them millions....but that didn't work out either.

Now they still haven't figured out what to do, besides operating it as a hunting preserve. And the trees are not improving. No millions yet, but management of the forest would get them the profits again....

walyo
12-16-2012, 04:03 PM
Andy, I had the same notion initially but went with the gas cylinder instead.
http://i1297.photobucket.com/albums/ag27/walyo1/Image1285-Copy.jpg
I http://i1297.photobucket.com/albums/ag27/walyo1/Image1280.jpghttp://i1297.photobucket.com/albums/ag27/walyo1/Image1282.jpghave been wanting to burn waste oil as well in my wood stove. However it is about 100 years old and has leaks everywhere. I've been watching for a newer one.

Kevin

bborr01
12-16-2012, 06:36 PM
Yes Brian, waste oil. It keeps the place nice and snug.
I was also able to create my first "V" spring with it recently.

Kevin

V spring?

walyo
12-16-2012, 07:08 PM
"V" spring. Unfortunately, where I reside it`s illegal to have them without a piece of paper called a licence/permit.
I`m not quiet sure how to post pics discretely; but I guess you have guessed already.

Kevin

vpt
12-16-2012, 08:53 PM
Andy, I had the same notion initially but went with the gas cylinder instead.
http://i1297.photobucket.com/albums/ag27/walyo1/Image1285-Copy.jpg

Kevin



That is great! I think I would need something bigger though for a 25x36' shop, yes?

bborr01
12-16-2012, 10:17 PM
John,

Thanks for the information on your stove. I just caught the part about it burning sawdust. I have a friend who uses a chainsaw sawmill to cut logs into lumber and he gets HUGE amounts of sawdust. He asked me if I thought I could design a machine to press it into large pellets. I think it had to do with being easier to handle and burning better. Maybe the sawdust doesn't need to be compressed after all. I look forward to more pictures also.

Thanks,
Brian

+ or - Zero
12-16-2012, 10:33 PM
"V" spring. Unfortunately, where I reside it`s illegal to have them without a piece of paper called a licence/permit.
I`m not quiet sure how to post pics discretely; but I guess you have guessed already.

Kevin

Forgive the OT question, I won't pursue it further in this thread, but I'm very curious about this one thing.

There are parts here in the USA that require a license, I do not think a V spring is one of them, but the real question is, where you are is it the part that requires the license or is it the entire unit it's part of that is verboten there? (because I find a V spring to be an odd part to be licensed)

Thanks.

walyo
12-17-2012, 08:16 AM
Yes +or- zero, the entire unit needs the licence.


Kevin

walyo
12-17-2012, 08:23 AM
That is great! I think I would need something bigger though for a 25x36' shop, yes?
Andy you could always double up. One on top of the other type thing.
My shed is 30`x20 and I find it works well for me.

Regards Kevin

lwalker
12-17-2012, 12:34 PM
Awesome. Is that a CoCo II ? How does it restart if power goes out?

[edit] Just saw your link. That's really neat: I've been a CoCo fan since high school and owned at least one of each model starting with the Micro in 1983. I used a TRS-80 Model 100 (? the one with the LCD display) to replace the thermostat in a couple of apartments I lived in. Somehow once I became a homeowner, home automation kinda lost its charm.



Used this for about 15 years: (note the solenoid on the door)

http://www.oldengine.org/members/jdunmyer/personal/stove/dec23_10.jpg

controlled by this:

http://www.oldengine.org/members/jdunmyer/personal/stove/dec23_05.jpg

Now have a gas furnace. Not sure if it's an improvement, but it sure is easier!

full story on the stove is here: http://www.oldengine.org/members/jdunmyer/personal/stove/

jdunmyer
12-17-2012, 08:02 PM
lwalker,
Yes, that's a COCO 2. We got into both woodstoves and computers in 1980, and I immediately wanted to marry the 2. The A/D stuff was a bit beyond me, but one day I thought of the COCO: it has 4 A/D converters in the joystick X & Y inputs, and has a relay output that turns on/off the cassett recorder. All are accessable from BASIC, of course. I grabbed a couple of books on OpAmps and a Radio Shack breadboard and went to work. It took a surprisingly short time to cook up a working prototype, and I later built V2.0 that worked even better. The COCO had a battery backup, plugged directly into the cartridge port to keep it going during a power bump.

I have 2 or 3 Model 100's, picked up at a hamfest just because they were only 10 bucks. Also have a Model 200. We must have bought nearly every model of R.S.'s computers up through the Model 3000. Starting with a Pocket Computer, then a Model I, etc.

The stove and computer setup is still here, but I doubt I'll ever put it back into operation. For one thing, I took out the chimney. It sure worked well for lots of years, though.

derekm
12-18-2012, 11:20 AM
Well had to shoot out this morning straight from home and didn't get back until 1:30 and this was waiting for me on the yard.

...
Luverly jubbly.

If that counts as industrial waste and you are disposing of it, dont you need loads of bit of paper, other than to light the fire? and dont you need to give said furniture place loads of bits of paper in return?
I suppose therefore it doesnt count as industrial waste then. :)

michigan doug
12-18-2012, 11:48 AM
All interesting facts floating around in this thread.

Mr. Waylow, how would you feel about a build thread on your oil burner? Is this a drip-in-the-pan oil burner, similar to the Mother Earth news product?

How is the oil flow regulated? Needle valve?

Is the oil filtered??




Inquiring minds want to know.

doug

Rex
12-18-2012, 02:35 PM
Interesting thread. I have a 55-gallon drum wood heater, came with the building. I stack my metal stock on top of it in a rack, as a heat-sink/thermal mass radiator.
I have been intending to convert it to waste oil, using a siphon spray on shop air.

walyo
12-18-2012, 04:40 PM
Hi Doug,
Yes, an ordinary drip-in-the-pan job. A lever valve was the nearest thing available at the time. Regulating it takes practice,(not ideal). The oil supply line extends up into the bottom of the supply tank about 2". Unfiltered for the time-being.
Ideally , I think the supply pipe should be wrapped around the burner to pre-heat the oil also.
Rex, your idea of the siphon and air sounds like the way to go.

Regards
Kevin

Alistair Hosie
12-18-2012, 05:30 PM
John You make me sick lucky or what I believe if you stepped in doggy doodie there would be a few large diamonds to be found in it.I never get free wood hand delivered then I don't know as many people as you so anyway when are you sending me a few samples EH? when I ask WHEN it's so unfair I'm better that you I have nearly seventeen and elevenpece halpenny all in gold can we swop. I thought not.LUCKY BUGGER Alistair ps have a nice christmas maybe santa will bring you a sliding table saw for your new wood? ,

Black_Moons
12-18-2012, 06:05 PM
If john was really smart he would (hire someone) to sort through that wood and pick out all the pen blank sized peices and sell em for $1~5 each. ($1 in assorted bulk, $5 for some rather rare woods indivualy)

Thats basiclly any chunk 3/4x3/4x5" or so.

+ or - Zero
12-18-2012, 06:31 PM
If john was really smart he would (hire someone) to sort through that wood and pick out all the pen blank sized peices and sell em for $1~5 each. ($1 in assorted bulk, $5 for some rather rare woods indivualy)

Thats basiclly any chunk 3/4x3/4x5" or so.

I would not be surprised if he does do that --I'd be very surprised if he mentioned it...

(if I correctly understood the deal involved in getting it for free)

John Stevenson
12-18-2012, 06:42 PM
Just had another full skip delivered today and will get another on late Thursday or Friday before they shut down for Christmas.
Now getting mixed wood, some hardwood but a lot of chipboard and OSB or sterling board.

This company is very busy, they make 1300 units per week, a unit could be an easy chair or settee. Most goes for export to the Middle East hotel trade but the cheap end of the market.

The hardwood is always beech and it's not always of the best quality as you never see what's inside a settee, add to this many of the shapes have been bandsawn so got conducive for wood turning.

They do get some nice pieces that would do for pen blanks but these pieces, called lumpwood, in the furniture trade are kept separate and go into big 1 tonne builders sand bags. Can get plenty of these bags in the summer for free but in the winter their own guys keep these back as they all have wood burners.

Thanks for the idea though.

Their guys aren't interested in the crap stuff that goes into the big pallets, once in it's hard to get out unless you tip the whole pallet.
They tip the pallet into those big roll on roll off skips and pay £385 to have it tipped, the more I take, the less they have to pay.

The factory is literally 150 yards up the road, they bring the pallet down on a fork truck and dump it on the yard. I pick it up and moved it over the wood compound I have made and open the flap and it self empties, then take it back on my new fork truck, that's why the panic a few weeks ago to get a new fork truck.

Took some photo's in the shop tonight to help a couple of guys out but realised not got any of the inside of the fire, will do it tomorrow.

madman
12-18-2012, 10:14 PM
Used to have a old coal stove , we would burn anything in it to heat our shop,,old hydro poles railroad ties ,,,also hooked up a oil dripper to get rid of old motor oil from the Motorbikes, man that stove would glow red then the heat would really pour off, Lucky never burnt down the Barn.. Now in floor heat with space saver hot water tank I set up works extremely well zero maint now for a few years.

goodscrap
12-19-2012, 08:21 PM
A chap up the road from me has a beast of a wood burner, all home fabricated (he is a sheet metal worker), it's been rebuilt about 5 times over the years but the current evolution is holding out well, previous models warped so much the door wouldn't shut at times, that version was mostly 1/8" Thick plate the current one is 1/4" all over except for the door, the door has a box section frame about 2" off the door plate and threaded studs join the two, the door can then be adjusted if it changes shape.

It's got cross tubes above the firefox (with a very thick wall) and a fan with ducting and vents to blow hot air into his shop, he's also added a water radiator that can be motorised onto the back to heat water indirectly or run a couple of radiators in the next shop.

I popped round last week for a chat and he was just unloading a van full of MDF waste, aparantly it burns about three times as well as wood because of all the glue/resin. Baring in mind it was below freezing outside and close to 25C inside, the burner works very well, takes up about a 3ft square footprint and heats a 40'x80' shop.

Abner
12-21-2012, 11:24 AM
A wood stove named 'Lucifer'. That is what my mother-in-law needed in the basement so she could burn her kids rock music instead of just breaking them...:/
Does it have a 'door' or is it the 'gate of hades'. Oh my god that stove is pregnant with humor possibilities.
Lu∑ci∑fer (ls-fr)
n.
1. The archangel cast from heaven for leading the revolt of the angels; Satan.
2. The planet Venus in its appearance as the morning star.
3. lucifer A friction match.

John Stevenson
12-21-2012, 03:37 PM
OK pic from inside


http://www.stevenson-engineers.co.uk/files/woodstove4.jpg

Behind each of the 4 corner louvre plates there is a gap in the outer wrapper about 1 1/2" wide so it can suck air up the hollow leg and thru the louvres.

The louvre plates are just flat 6mm thick steel plates with a U cut in by a laser. I then support these on the press with a piece of tube under the U shaped section, put a 1/2" nut on the top and press down, this form the louvre

Machine
12-21-2012, 09:39 PM
I toyed with the idea of kerosene, wood or waste oil heat in my garage (a 457 square feet double garage). But I opted for electric because of simplicity, ease of use and safety. I'm not afraid of wood heat, I actually heat my home almost exclusively with wood, but I really liked the idea of a simple, easy to use electric heater that minimized safety hazards. My workshop is relatively small and well insulated, so electric made the most sense for my application. I needed about a 5kW or better heater to get the job done, so shopped around and it seemed like the DR988 heater got good reviews. So I sprung for it and got it along with all the fixins' to hook 'er up to the breaker box. The heater needed a 220 VAC/30A NEMA #6 receptacle. Fortunately the breaker box was right next to where the heater needed to be, so that worked out fine once I got the parts to run to the outlet. I built a 2x4 and 2x10 wood overhead/hanging fixture equipped with a rotating mount so the heater could be adjusted and directed to where I wanted it at the flick of a wrist. Works great, and although it hasn't gotten that cold yet (mid 30's F or ~1.7 C) if left on for more than 2 hours it seems to pretty easily hit 70 deg F (21 C). I figure at my kW/hr rate it costs me about $5 for 8 hours of constant run time, which is unlikely considering our relatively mild winters and I prefer the shop closer to around 62 F anyway (as long as I'm working and not just sitting there sipping beer or pinot noir :rolleyes:).

http://i289.photobucket.com/albums/ll224/my-pics-are-here/garage/garage1_zps06ed5512.jpg
http://i289.photobucket.com/albums/ll224/my-pics-are-here/garage/garage4_zps8a8ee4e3.jpg
http://i289.photobucket.com/albums/ll224/my-pics-are-here/garage/garage2_zpscc9bf25b.jpg

Black_Moons
12-21-2012, 09:49 PM
Machine: bonus being you can plug a good sized welder into that plug now if need be.
Or a cloths dryer....

lakeside53
12-21-2012, 09:52 PM
That's how mine is set up. 7Kw heater (3.5kw on "low") plugged into my 50 amp welder outlet.

Machine
12-21-2012, 10:03 PM
Yeah it works out pretty good. Plus it's hung up out of the way so I don't lose any of my precious 457 sqft shop space. This unit is a 5.6kW and it seems to work great for a space this size as long as it's reasonably well insulated. I included a picture of my garage doors above because previously they weren't insulated. I bought a foam panel kit called "Insulfoam" and installed them to remedy the situation. The panels were kind of a pain in the a** to install into my garage doors (more problematic than I had been led to believe), but in the end it was worth it.
http://images.lowes.com/product/converted/732813/732813100676.jpg

sasquatch
12-21-2012, 10:10 PM
Machine, nicely insulated garage doors. In the second pic, what is that lathe on the cast legs showing?

Machine
12-21-2012, 10:17 PM
Machine, nicely insulated garage doors. In the second pic, what is that lathe on the cast legs showing?

That's a 1925 Southbend 11" X 5' I've been working on. I have it mostly taken apart right now for cleaning and paint stripping. Pretty soon I'm gonna start putting it back together and then the issue of "accurizing" it will be front and center. Hopefully the smart folks here can help me out with that because I won't have a clue how to get her straight.

Kenny G
12-24-2012, 05:48 PM
Seeing as the Scandinavian's have more severe winters than us here in Scotland, I took the decision some 10 years ago to install an old Morso Multiburner Stove which has seen me through some severe conditions. The trick is to have a plentiful supply of seasoned wood with a mix of coal and peat which I can get get in this neck of the wood's.
To keep the wife happy I bought her an Aga Cooker, also scandinavian. A great tool for stress relieving connecting rods and various parts!
Keep warm and a Very Merry Christmas to all.

https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-84bmgeLYYHM/UNjMqQCysbI/AAAAAAAAAk0/HuM8f9gAicY/s128/DSCF2066.JPG

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-YNAVoZ8CZBE/UNjLnpSIFzI/AAAAAAAAAkg/DnCqXiA-JNU/s640/DSCF2024.JPG

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-sxNmrYwOepU/UNjMFpK487I/AAAAAAAAAks/amzLR0bs3X0/s512/DSCF2093.JPG

John Stevenson
01-23-2013, 06:48 PM
Well it was a bit nippy this morning in the shop and I 'think' I might have got a tad over excited stoking up Lucifer.

http://www.stevenson-engineers.co.uk/files/woodstove5.jpg


Good news is I cam temper silver steel tools without taking them out the machine :rolleyes:

Peter.
01-23-2013, 06:55 PM
Christ them old bones must take some heating - I get woozy if I let the steam generator in my shower hit 30 degrees.

Richard King
01-23-2013, 07:15 PM
It's nice to see your shop, it reminds me of mine...super organized. :D

Black_Moons
01-23-2013, 07:15 PM
John: Never post pictures of your keys online, Or you might as well just leave them in the locks.

Its trival to copy a key based on a picture of it, because there is a limited number of 'cuts' and they are very diffrent from eachother.

John Stevenson
01-23-2013, 07:27 PM
They are for the laser cutter and internal in the shop.

If they do break in they have everything from oxy cutting to plamsa's to grinders to big hammers to break out again.:o

+ or - Zero
01-23-2013, 08:06 PM
Well it was a bit nippy this morning in the shop and I 'think' I might have got a tad over excited stoking up Lucifer.

Good news is I cam temper silver steel tools without taking them out the machine :rolleyes:

Need to be a bit easier about doing that --could cause a devil of a problem.

Black_Moons
01-24-2013, 08:02 AM
They are for the laser cutter and internal in the shop.

If they do break in they have everything from oxy cutting to plamsa's to grinders to big hammers to break out again.:o

Ah, You lucky bastard, laser cutter with key lockout!
When I bought my mill, the picture had a key lockout.
When I got it, No key lockout! I complained and was told they just randomly change the panel on him and he has not updated the picture. Grumble. I wanted my key lockout! Not that I have any use for it, It just seems that keys make machines cooler looking.

John Stevenson
01-24-2013, 09:26 AM
Mine didn't have it either.
Just put a key switch across the laser supply switch, reason for this is my grand daughter uses the machine.
Don't mind that but I have to be there when it's cutting.

This way she can program it and run it, just not cut.

A.K. Boomer
01-24-2013, 11:02 AM
Either of the temps is roasting away but the latter is too warm to work!...


What SJ failed to mention is that once he get's all the thermal mass in his shop finally up to temps he doesn't have to build another fire for three weeks...

Great name for a stove, if hell has a wood stove it's going to look exactly like "lucy", except a little bigger.

A.K. Boomer
01-24-2013, 11:18 AM
I almost had SJ beat for the ugliest stove contest;


http://i146.photobucket.com/albums/r249/AK_Boomer/DSC00405.jpg


but then this happened;


http://i146.photobucket.com/albums/r249/AK_Boomer/DSC00418.jpg

big job
01-24-2013, 11:20 AM
Nothing works around here but going back when you could do things cheap way
I think it was a 50gal vertical tank then a car driveshaft for the chimmney,
then gravity tank with drain oil with a ball cock dripping on a brake drum. Then
I coiled the copper tubing (drip oil in) and heated with berzomatic torch lit fire
in the brake drum, then get the drip just right that thing puts out BUT just like
now adays with the french fry oil for bio diesel , they gave away= rid of it, now
it aint even worth it. cause I dont generate enough drain oil now gas stations
want the bucks. there ya go the almighty buck. p/s it was good till they caught
on. also the berzomatic once the oil gets warmed and the brake drum gets
warmed till its happy then it gets a cookin get it just right and drum gets cherry.