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JCHannum
12-18-2012, 11:31 AM
I might be late to the party, but just ran across his videos on engine building, casting and general machining. They are quite well done, short enough as not to become tedious yet still be informational.

I see some good tips such as the lead filled flywheel and the taper mounted, wobble free flywheel. I do have a question for anyone who might be familiar with his work; his castings appear to be aluminum (aluminium? he simply refers to it as alloy) and he seems to finish bore his cylinders without an iron liner. Am I missing something or did I not look at enough of the vids?

Set aside a couple of hours before clicking on link;

http://www.youtube.com/user/myfordboy?feature=watch

michigan doug
12-18-2012, 09:23 PM
What kind of engine do you want to build?

Aluminum might be just fine, lot's have done it.

Cast iron will last a lot longer, properly cared for.


How did we get along before youtube???

doug

JCHannum
12-18-2012, 09:55 PM
The IC engines I have built are of cast iron and those with aluminum cylinders that I have seen previously, such as those built by Phil Duclos use cast iron liners. I am just curious as to how MB does it. Does he sleeve them, or use other than cast iron rings, which is the norm. I am aware that some use O-rings for piston rings, replacing them when worn.

For steam or hot air, I see no problem with brass or aluminum for the cylinder, I have built several steam engines of brass.

Bob Fisher
12-18-2012, 10:34 PM
Remember the Vega? GM found a way to run an engine in an Aluminum block. It got a bad rap, mostly because of bad head gaskets. As I recall, they impregnated the aluminum with silicon carbide. Had one, but my son totaled it at 27K, so can't say how long it might have lasted. Still easier to use cast iron. Bob.

wierdscience
12-18-2012, 11:05 PM
I guess service factor would have some say in cylinder material.It's not like a model engine will be running under 75%-80% load for hours at a time day in day out for years.If it were expected to then design accordingly.

MyfordBoy's video series is great,if your at all interested in home casting he pretty much covers all the bases.

Optics Curmudgeon
12-19-2012, 01:01 AM
The Vega's downfall was the "siamese cylinder walls", not enough cooling there, eventually the wall scuffed and the thing would suddenly burn oil like a freighter.

MrFluffy
12-19-2012, 05:00 AM
Cool wall technology small Brigg's run the piston right in the block casting material as do a lot of "budget" small engines now. It's not a nikasil liner plated on or other surface conditioning, as you can bore the block oversize when its knackered.

I'm used to taking them apart and finding scores and damage, they seem a bit rubbish compared to the longevity of the cast iron linered IC series, but most of the engines are used and abused. For a model engine with small number of hours, I'd guess it would be fine.

The speed of myfordboy's donkey saw always alarms me. That thing must cut at insane sfm's. I watch my old donkey saw take hours to chew through a bar of material at its own gentle pace, and he just throws stock on it and it whizzes through!

IanPendle
12-19-2012, 06:25 AM
What I like about the Myfordboy videos, is that in addition to excellent content, he actually edits the video so you avoid endless footage of repetitive and/or mundane operations. I suspect that he has put an enormous of effort and thought into his videos. First class stuff, which puts a lot of paid-for videos to shame.

Ian.

Highpower
12-19-2012, 03:46 PM
Remember the Vega? GM found a way to run an engine in an Aluminum block. It got a bad rap, mostly because of bad head gaskets. As I recall, they impregnated the aluminum with silicon carbide. Had one, but my son totaled it at 27K, so can't say how long it might have lasted. Still easier to use cast iron. Bob.

I bought one of those cheap back in the late 70's that smoked like a chimney. Nice looking GT coupe/hatchback. Tore it down and took the bare block to an old machine shop down in the city. Some locals that were hanging out on the corner were eyeballing me as I walked to the back of my pickup to retrieve the block. Several jaws hit the sidewalk as I reached over the side of the bed and pulled the block out with one hand and carried it into the shop. LOL!

Slipped in a set of cast iron liners and drove that car a good many years. Eventually sold it with 185K on the clock to a neighbor, who's daughter drove it another 5 years or so. I still miss having it. It could be 20 below zero outside and it would still fire up every time before the crank hand a chance to spin over two revolutions.