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View Full Version : How is your lathe positioned??



goose
12-29-2012, 10:15 PM
Something that was on my mind, as I am moving stuff around in the shop, also, recently was at another HSM's workshop where he had two lathes, positioned in the center of the floor at roughly a 45 degree angle off the wall. Seemed to work well for him. Currently my lathe is positioned with it's back against a wall, which consumes alot of wall space, also leaves a pile of chips behind it that is hard to reach.

Any suggestions? What works best in your shop?



Thanx.

Tony Ennis
12-29-2012, 10:18 PM
My shop is about 12' x 12' (corner in the basement) so there isn't much room in any event. I have it against a wall, underneath a window. There's plenty of wall space behind the lathe, though I don't put anything on the wall behind the head stock for safety reasons.

herbet999
12-29-2012, 10:25 PM
Against the wall... Yes chips are an issue... Been meaning to build a backdrop to direct chips into a waste bin

PixMan
12-29-2012, 10:27 PM
Up against a wall...not enough room to put it anywhere and far too heavy to move it again. To clean out chips I generally just grab the ShopVac and vacuum the chips out from the chip pan and around.under the machine.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v466/kenm10759/Dads%20shop/IMG_1534-r.jpg

bborr01
12-29-2012, 10:30 PM
Gary,

My lathe is about 4,000 # so I needed to place it where I had a good solid slab under it. Found what I thought was a good place but I don't have enough length to its left to run long stock. I am currently running black pipe for compressed air and got to thinking that I could probably save myself some labor by using the lathe for threading pipe, but I don't have enough room to get long pipe into it without taking my tailstock off and feeding it in from that direction. I also hear you on the problem of cleaning out chips from the back of the machine when it is against a wall. You need some room to get in there. Our lathe department had about 8 lathes of various sizes and they were all at about a 30 degree angle like this \\\\\\\\. Benches on the tailstock end and open at the headstock end.

So I guess that the main thing is to have clearance to feed stock into it from the headstock end and room behind it to clean.

Brian

Greg Q
12-29-2012, 10:48 PM
One side of my two car garage workshop is set up like an "E". The top leg is workbench and toolboxes against a wall with overhead lights. The middle leg is the lathe, tailstock to the wall. I made an aluminum extrusion frame to support the splash back, DRO and tool storage. It too sports an overhead light shining on the lathe.

The bay behind the lathe has the mill, drill press and shop press. Placing the lathe at ninety to the wall has in effect given me eight more feet of wall and divided the garage bay into two smaller work areas.

Greg

KiddZimaHater
12-29-2012, 10:52 PM
Mine sits at about a 15 degree angle away from the wall, so I can get behind it to work on the motor, and sweep chips.
The headstock is against the garage door, so If I need to extend a long bar thru it, I can just open the door.
Like this:
_
http://img818.imageshack.us/img818/4612/lathe23.jpg

Toolguy
12-29-2012, 10:53 PM
Mine is against the wall, with the headstock out about 15" and the tailstock out about 4". This allows room to clean behind and gets the spindle in front of storage cabinets for long stock.

The Artful Bodger
12-29-2012, 11:10 PM
I put a concrete bench in the middle of my shop and positioned my machines (lathe, shaper, cold saw, drill) back to back on the bench with my mill floor standing at the end of the bench. I was careful to position the machines so that long stock would go in the saw and in the lathe.

Cleaning behind the machines is easy enough just by reaching in between machines on the other side of the bench.

The shop walls are reserved for storage cabinets and a work bench. A skylight over the machine bench provides a lot of natural light.

chipmaker4130
12-29-2012, 11:23 PM
After having my lathe against the wall in my garage for years, I resolved to do things differently in my 'new' shop. I have it 2' out from the wall both for cleaning and for the very occasional rear carriage gib adjustment. I also lined up my lathe, mill and drill press so that none interferes with the other, but with table adjustments (except the lathe, of course) each can help support long stock for the others. It's been working well.

mike4
12-29-2012, 11:42 PM
My main machines are positioned to allow access with large or long items , I can get behind the mill and the lathe which gets the most use is near a door and has a walkway to a tool store behind it , cleaning is easy if still a pain.
Michael

J Tiers
12-30-2012, 12:40 AM
You have some big shops...... 12 x 12 sounds like West Texas to me...... my main area is 8 x 7, with a bit of added space outside between the wall and furnace. It's full, and I have to fit another lathe and a mill in there besides what is already in place. No idea how that is happening.

My existing lathe is positioned against the wall, headstock out a bit further due to drive setup, about 18" from wall to end of headstock for longer stock.

oxford
12-30-2012, 12:59 AM
I am putting mine against a wall. Head stock should end up in the middle of a 20' wall. I may angle the lathe slightly so anything really long will have some clearance away from stuff on the wall. I will also be building a back for it to try at keep chips at ease and the wall clean.

lakeside53
12-30-2012, 01:08 AM
I have benches and cabinets against the wall, a 3+ foot "isle" then the lathe facing the benches with its back to the middle of the room. Grinding stations behind the lathe. Works perfectly and I can walk behind it if needed. I put some thought into this... and it will be there "forever" - way too heavy to consider moving.

Black Forest
12-30-2012, 02:59 AM
I feel sometimes as though I am getting in touch with my female side! I have moved my machines around quite a bit in the last two months trying to come up with the best workflow and space utilization.
The way my wife moves the furniture in the living room. Right now my lathe is against a wall but far enough out to get behind if I must.

I am set to move them all again in the next couple of weeks. I want to put them on the other end of the shop.

big job
12-30-2012, 04:57 AM
My shop is 2200 sq feet and Im out of room.

DATo
12-30-2012, 05:22 AM
60% stocks ... 40% bonds.

1-800miner
12-30-2012, 09:47 AM
Mostly horizontal,with a small list to starboard.

vpt
12-30-2012, 09:54 AM
Against a garage door. That way if I am real desperate to reach the back side I just open the door.

http://img210.imageshack.us/img210/8682/lathewoodbase003.jpg

Ohio Mike
12-30-2012, 10:30 AM
The lathe I use the most was the first I purchased and its still against the wall with a Bridgeport to the right of it. Lathe #2 is undergoing some repairs. If I had the space I'd have the lathes out in the open and angled like the OP mentioned. My preference would be to have all the large machines out in the open with benches, tool cabinets and smaller tools like grinders etc along the walls. To have an efficient layout I need somewhere between 50-100% more space than I currently have.

Tony Ennis
12-30-2012, 10:47 AM
Against a garage door.

Haha Andy, no chance of using your garage as a garage, is there! I'm glad you're not in denial :-D

Rustybolt
12-30-2012, 01:42 PM
How is your lathe positioned??



Well. It's not as well off as I'd like it to be, but I'd like to think it's positioned to advantage of a falling market.

Scottike
12-30-2012, 02:09 PM
I have my 5' long lathe set about 1' away from the 12' wide back wall of my shop. A garbage can for chips at the
tailstock end and a small roll away for tools at the headstock end. I have about 3' from the end of the headstock
to the wall. Since my spindle bore is only 1", working stock longer than I have room for seems unlikely.


, but I'd like to think it's positioned to advantage of a falling market.

Put Options?

Dr Stan
12-30-2012, 03:34 PM
I am set to move them all again in the next couple of weeks. I want to put them on the other end of the shop.

If you have access to CAD try using it for your shop layout. If not, make a grid of your shop say 12:1 (Imperial measurements) or 10:1 (metric) along with to scale footprints of your machines. A whole lot easier to move around bits of paper/cardboard than multi-ton equipment.

If you want to get really fancy, have 3D models made using a rapid prototyping machine. :rolleyes:

As to the original question like most others have said keep in mind room so longer stock can extend out of the spindle. One thing many/most forget is room to pull the lead screw if/when necessary. Same thing applies to mills.

loose nut
12-30-2012, 04:59 PM
Doesn't Grizzly have an online shop layout/design cad program.

Dr Stan
12-30-2012, 05:36 PM
Doesn't Grizzly have an online shop layout/design cad program.

Now that you mention it, I think you're correct.

vpt
12-30-2012, 06:58 PM
Haha Andy, no chance of using your garage as a garage, is there! I'm glad you're not in denial :-D

Well not that stall any more. lol

I do have two other doors and bays open to use though. :)

hareng
12-30-2012, 07:40 PM
Mine hasnt been used as a garage for 23 years.

Only my scrapped Myford ML7 toy lathe was at an angle as it had no back splash and by some chance if could create some swarf i could get round the back or drag it out with stand.

Other two up against the wall length ways with back splash. I just delve in and grab an arm full of swarf and sling by the door. Heres after a couple of hours with previous scrapped Harrison 140
http://i1140.photobucket.com/albums/n563/Jonhareng/Jons%20machining/T5020offInitialswarf.jpg
Luckily got a far bigger pan to hold swarf now between clean outs.

Boucher
12-30-2012, 07:50 PM
Mine is positioned about 10" out from the L shaped wall.
http://i109.photobucket.com/albums/n50/boucherbyron/IMG_0150Small.jpg

There are 8" shelves above the back of the lathe for storage.
http://i109.photobucket.com/albums/n50/boucherbyron/IMG_0165Small.jpg

Two tool chests for storage are to the right of the tailstock.
http://i109.photobucket.com/albums/n50/boucherbyron/IMG_0041.jpg

rubes
12-30-2012, 10:39 PM
If you have access to CAD try using it for your shop layout...If you want to get really fancy, have 3D models made using a rapid prototyping machine.

Problem with that for me is I never make a final decision...hahaha. currently have no less than 10 layouts.
been messing with the shop layout on CAD all summer. 1 car garage ~12x22
not quite 3D models, but can move around to see how the flow works.
currently have the lathe 90deg to the wall, and the mill 90deg to that.


http://img195.imageshack.us/img195/7342/shoplayout8.jpg (http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/195/shoplayout8.jpg/)

Paul Alciatore
12-30-2012, 11:31 PM
I am in the process of setting up a shop. I have a CAD plan and in it the lathe and mill are back to back in the middle of the room (a 20' x 21', two car garage) at about a 45 degree angle to the walls. I have the back of the lathe spindle pointing toward a corner with about 8' 6" clearance so I can feed 8 foot long stock into it - with suitable outboard supports, of course. Ditto for the tailstock end. The mill also has large clearances at the ends of the table so over sized work can be positioned on it, again with suitable outboard supports. I have seen a lot of older shops where the lathes are positioned at an angle to the isles or walls and I assumed it was to allow over sized work when needed.

In my layout it also works out well for viewing the TV, which is in a corner. That was one of the first things I installed.

I plan to drop power from the ceiling to these machines and a small bench in this island.

J Tiers
12-30-2012, 11:53 PM
I like CAD.... but CAD designs often have a problem with being close, but not really "on", when it comes to actual workable layouts. You have to be able to quantify the "ease of use" considerations, or there will be lots of "I need to move this 6" over" type issues.

Hopefully, you actually HAVE the 6" you want.

JoeFin
12-31-2012, 09:20 AM
Against a garage door. That way if I am real desperate to reach the back side I just open the door.

http://img210.imageshack.us/img210/8682/lathewoodbase003.jpg

Mine is just like yours, up against the garage door with the exception of the garage door being insulated with "Easy to wipe the oil off of" Foil Backed Styrofoam Insulation

ogre
12-31-2012, 09:37 AM
I cant believe flylo hasnt chimed in lol. He'd have to start by first saying my 300' by 150' hanger is not enough room for my 30 lathes,15mills,4 shapers and hundreds more misc machines and rotory tables,antiques and toys lol.
As for me,I have a 2 1/2 car garage so packed i can hardly pull a car in for fuxing anymore,which was my main hobby,but have always done my own house and woodwork also along with kids scooters/go karts and metal fabrication with my Hobart mig. I always wanted to do machining but couldnt afford another hobby,so i found a semi cheap 13"Southbend that i just moved up against a wall w headstock open to the left and 3' till wall at tailstock. I just finished its complete teardown and paint,adjust,lube.Shes from 1929 or 1931 i forget. My Van Norman vertical AND horizontal mill is sitting 90 from lathe headstock w approx 3'between then. The Van Norman is in process of complete teardown,cleaning,paint,lube,adjust.
Ive enjoyed seeing and hearing about your shops guys,and learned some valuable stuff. 1st thing im doing is puttin a chip catcher/cardboard wall behind the lathe for chip control. By the way,i got my VN mill from flylo who i couldnt thank enough for his generousity. Thanks guys!

vpt
12-31-2012, 09:42 AM
Mine is just like yours, up against the garage door with the exception of the garage door being insulated with "Easy to wipe the oil off of" Foil Backed Styrofoam Insulation



That is an old photo, since then I have insulated and drywalled the shop (well at least drywalled the ceiling). For the doors I insulated them with styrofoam and then used a bathroom type (plastic) paneling cover.

Not sure if you can tell the doors are different (insulated and covered) in this pic. I was taking a pic of the jig I made to jack the drywall to the ceiling.

http://img338.imageshack.us/img338/9692/drywalljack004.jpg

ogre
12-31-2012, 10:09 AM
Awesome idea on drywall lift VPT. I will burn that into memory next time i need it.

Lu47Dan
12-31-2012, 10:13 AM
You have some big shops...... 12 x 12 sounds like West Texas to me...... my main area is 8 x 7, with a bit of added space outside between the wall and furnace. It's full, and I have to fit another lathe and a mill in there besides what is already in place. No idea how that is happening.
Then 12 X 33 must sound like Alaska to you. :D
My lathe is against the wall, by the man door, at the present time. When I finish the footer repairs and pour the new floor I am going to move it from where it is into it new position against another wall in the shop. My big mill (Kondia CNC Powermill) will set in the space occupied my my lathe at the present time.
Dan,

vpt
12-31-2012, 11:03 AM
Awesome idea on drywall lift VPT. I will burn that into memory next time i need it.



Its a bit slow but still better than trying to lift them by hand. lol

J Tiers
12-31-2012, 11:34 AM
Then 12 X 33 must sound like Alaska to you. :D


Just Texas.... Alaska is reserved for the 60 x 100 shops.....

And, I get my revenge....... you all have to HEAT those shops..... I don't have to heat anything to get good shirtsleeve temperatures in my shop.

Black Forest
12-31-2012, 11:48 AM
Just Texas.... Alaska is reserved for the 60 x 100 shops.....

And, I get my revenge....... you all have to HEAT those shops..... I don't have to heat anything to get good shirtsleeve temperatures in my shop.

That is really true. My shop is 34 feet by 68 feet and it is cold in winter. I really wanted to build a new shop this year with a bridge crane covering the entire shop but because of health issues(being electrocuted) I never got to the project. Next year I hope! I want to build a 10 meter by 20 meter shop essentially the same size as I have now. If I build it any bigger the wife will take it over and make a indoor riding hall out of it so I have to be careful.

Dr Stan
12-31-2012, 12:34 PM
I cant believe flylo hasnt chimed in lol. He'd have to start by first saying my 300' by 150' hanger is not enough room for my 30 lathes,15mills,4 shapers and hundreds more misc machines and rotory tables,antiques and toys lol.

Maybe he's already started celebrating the New Year! :rolleyes:

Alistair Hosie
12-31-2012, 05:02 PM
I positioned mine frml;y against the wall at 1250 killos it is not going to be moved so on the outside of the building I have a doorway which is lockable and can be opened to get to the rear for suds filling with oild etc and general maintenence.Have agreat new year folks it's ten o'clock and We are going to bed. Alistair

loose nut
12-31-2012, 06:25 PM
Right in the middle of the shop, easy to get at the back, which you will sooner or later. Other moveable equipment behind it.

JoeLee
01-01-2013, 01:57 PM
When I first planted my lathe on the shop floor it looked like it was in the middle of the shop. As things grew around the machine it didn't look so out of place. The space behind it sure comes in handy for adjustments or repairs as well as cleaning up and will make mounting my read out scales a lot easier.

JL................

http://i911.photobucket.com/albums/ac317/JoeLee09/MY%20Clausing%205900%20Lathe/Image006.jpg

Bobrenz
01-01-2013, 02:29 PM
Mine is about 18" out from the wall. I just relocated the rotary phase converter to the other side of the wall so it is out of the chip landing zone. I raised it up 5" when I installed it to make it my height, and I can now use a push broom to chase chips pretty well. Whatever's left gets caught by the shop vac. This position gives me an aisle on both ends of the lathe, so I have some room to handle longer stock. Like all machine tool installations, it should be at least 10% larger in all dimensions...