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bborr01
12-31-2012, 12:11 PM
I just watched a youtube video of a snow plow from 1939. Pretty amazing what they could do way back then. If you have plowed snow or not, you might want to check it out.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=TZR2WbD3Hz0

Brian

gbritnell
12-31-2012, 12:34 PM
I wonder what the life cycle of the trucks and equipment was with all that pounding?
gbritnell

chucketn
12-31-2012, 12:46 PM
I remember a snow storm in the 60's in upstate N.Y., near Sidney. The township resorted to a WWII vintage halftrack truck to plow our road. The driver used the same battering method to break through 8-10' drifts. He would get a running start an slam into the drift, and the snow would fly back over the top of the cab. It even got stuck a couple of times and another plow truck behind it had to pull it clear of the drifts. When they were done plowing, the snowbanks were so high, my 6'4" Dad could hold a long handled snow shovel above his head by the hoop handle and not reach the top.
We had been snowed in for 2 weeks prior to the half track plowing. Dad would walk down our road to Rt8 and hitch a ride to work.
The next couple of years we built snowshoes!

Chuck

Edited to correct typos

uncle pete
12-31-2012, 03:29 PM
I've done quite a bit of snow plowing with tandems and the modern style single direction Frinks, and a hell of a lot with a variety of graders up to 16-G's with wings. That video makes me hurt all over just watching it. Your going to be beat to hell and your clutch leg is going to be trembling after an hour of that. And I can assure you that the frames and running gear mounts in those trucks were cracked everywhere due to that pounding. Even today the trucks are real high maintenance just from the front mounted plows in pretty easy conditions compared to that video..

I'm more than impressed though, 12' of wind blown snow drifts couldn't be handled very well even with a D-8 cat. And those weren't even thought of back then. And there's no way today's plows could do that job.

Pete

Black Forest
12-31-2012, 03:49 PM
What got my attention was the men standing directly in front of the plow when it hit the bank. They at times seemed just a few feet in front. I refer to the men rolling the snow boulders out of the way. I bet those trucks were completely destroyed after that battering they got. When were bulldozers common? That is what I have seen moving snow that deep. But that would have been in the 50's and 60's.

sasquatch
12-31-2012, 03:49 PM
Great video Brian, thanks for posting that!!

becksmachine
12-31-2012, 04:12 PM
I've done quite a bit of snow plowing with tandems and the modern style single direction Frinks, and a hell of a lot with a variety of graders up to 16-G's with wings. That video makes me hurt all over just watching it. Your going to be beat to hell and your clutch leg is going to be trembling after an hour of that. And I can assure you that the frames and running gear mounts in those trucks were cracked everywhere due to that pounding. Even today the trucks are real high maintenance just from the front mounted plows in pretty easy conditions compared to that video..

I'm more than impressed though, 12' of wind blown snow drifts couldn't be handled very well even with a D-8 cat. And those weren't even thought of back then. And there's no way today's plows could do that job.

Pete

Which is probably why someone invented the snow blower.

Dave

Carld
12-31-2012, 04:25 PM
Makes me real glad I don't live in snow country like that.

uncle pete
12-31-2012, 04:36 PM
Dave,
Yep your 100% right, but today those really are pretty rare other than in some of the mountain passes. At least in the west anyway. And they really are fairly slow with just how much distance they can cover in a shift. If you can get the speed up fast enough, you can throw snow a long ways with a plow. I'd doubt our truck mounted plows would work very well trying that with much over a couple of feet though.

Pete

bborr01
12-31-2012, 05:04 PM
I plowed snow when I was in high school for someone else and later bought a Chevy 4x4 short box and put plows on it, front and rear. When I was plowing for someone else, I spent a couple of years plowing sidewalks in Grand Rapids. Drove a Jeep cj3 I think with a v-blade that had 2" thick rubber scrapers on it. That was fun. How else can you drive on sidewalks without getting a ticket?

When I got my own rig, I really enjoyed plowing. Did some really large lots like trucking companies, driveways too but they were a pita with all the turning around to look at the back blade.

Eventually the idea of plowing all night and then going to work for 8 hours got old, so I just plowed my own driveway and a few for friends and such. Finally I sold the truck and now I plow with a John Deere 1020 that has a backblade and a loader. I sure miss the heat and stereo but with the amount of snow that we get in Michigan nowadays, I don't spend much time plowing.

Sasquatch, you're welcome.

Brian

Ohio Mike
12-31-2012, 05:07 PM
Very cool video. The man in front of the plow would hold up a shovel so the plow operator could have something to aim at. There was a note somewhere in there that the operator would drop is foot on the clutch just before impact to take the stress off the drive train. The scenes of the rear end of the truck bouncing up and down, made me hurt. Model hydraulics were not commonly available until after WW-II. The industrial modernization that happened with WW-II made hydraulics affordable.

As a side note to Uncle Pete, the Caterpillar D-8 was in production by 1939. Rated at something like 85HP is was a monster, as the average farm would had a 20 HP tractor at that time. A large ag tractor would have been in the 30-40 HP range.

flylo
12-31-2012, 05:34 PM
Our county is so poor, those would be an upgrade!

mygrizzly1022
12-31-2012, 05:36 PM
Hi All

Fast forward a few years.... http://www.thedieselgypsy.com/Labrador%20Snow.htm

Regards ..bert

Willy
12-31-2012, 05:37 PM
Great video. My whole body aches just thinking about the poor guy operating that thing.
The closest thing I can equate that to is running into a sand dune continuously!
Judging by all of the extra hands on deck and the fact there's a camera running I'm sure that it must have been a promotional film for Frink.

No one in his right mind would do that on a daily basis, not to mention expect the equipment to last very long.
Like Pete said front plows are very hard on trucks used in much easier conditions. I have plowed snow while employed for British Columbia highways maintenance contractors for 15 years and can testify to the fact that once you add a front plow, an under-body plow, a wing, and then throw on 30,000 lbs of sand your hands are full. Even with all that weight and 500 HP it's still awful tough on both man and machine busting through small snow drifts.
I don't think I'd be interested in buying that particular machine when they were done with it.:)
Never the less pretty amazing and entertaining film clip. Thanks.

uncle pete
12-31-2012, 05:44 PM
Mike,
Many thanks for the clarification. I didn't know that the D-8's were available that early. 85 HP and with those cable operated blades? I think I'd take a pass on trying one out. The D-11's do a much nicer job.;)

Edit,
And Willy neglected to add with all those blades on the ground and working along with the sander, you've still got to keep your head on a swivel for the odd fool who's determined to screw up beside or in front of you. I had a guy pass me on the right with the front plow down. No windsheild, grill, headlights, or even much paint left.

Pete

sasquatch
12-31-2012, 06:19 PM
There is still a few of those old "V" plows in my area, but all are being used on the front of log skidders to open winter roads.

JohnHarbeck
12-31-2012, 06:28 PM
In the '50's in NW Indiana, most of the county plows were Diamond-T with vee plows. In the heavier drifted places, they had a drawbar they used to couple another truck behind the plow truck and did the same kind on ram, back & ram to open the roads. At the time the county only had a couple road graders with vee plows, and it took nearly a week sometimes to get all the roads reopened. Later years, like after the 1967 'Great Blizzard', they provided some old vee plows to farmers owning some of the early articulated tractors. That helped open the roads much quicker. But, I recall a few times when a payloader was the tool of choice. I think they tried a rotary plow once, but never bought one for themselves -- probably 'ate' too many mailboxes, etc.

John in NW Indiana

Willy
12-31-2012, 06:31 PM
Edit,
And Willy neglected to add with all those blades on the ground and working along with the sander, you've still got to keep your head on a swivel for the odd fool who's determined to screw up beside or in front of you. I had a guy pass me on the right with the front plow down. No windsheild, grill, headlights, or even much paint left.

Pete

You too?
Must be the standard way of passing, sometimes I wonder..."why am I making the road faster"?
Glad I'm not doing it anymore.
Several times with front plow and underbody down, once with the wing down!
Sure makes a heck of a racket.http://i76.photobucket.com/albums/j31/250willy/cee48e43.jpg

Edited to add: The guy that tried passing with the wing down didn't make it by me!

bborr01
12-31-2012, 06:45 PM
I think they use graders aroung here when we really get hit hard and they have big drifts to open up. Big v-blade and belly blade with wing. They can move a lot of snow.

Brian

bruto
12-31-2012, 07:01 PM
INteresting video. That's mighty deep snow, and it looks as if it has been there a while before they got to it. Around here when they get really really deep snow, they usually end up needing bucket loaders. We've had a few of those in the past few years, slow and tedious to clear the worst ridges. Most of the time, roads are simply plowed all day and night so they never can get so deep at once.

Back in 69-70 there was a huge snowstorm in upstate NY. Where I was working at the time they had a small Unimog (Mercedes based 4 wheel drive ) tractor. They got a front mounted snowblower for that, and it could cut through a ten foot drift in one go. Very impressive little machine.

panchula
12-31-2012, 07:04 PM
I came across this one up in Marquette, MI. Wife said "Where would you park it?". I didn't bother calling the number. Darn logic.
http://www-personal.umich.edu/~panchula/snowblower.jpg

Robo
12-31-2012, 07:18 PM
In the '50's in NW Indiana, most of the county plows were Diamond-T with vee plows. In the heavier drifted places, they had a drawbar they used to couple another truck behind the plow truck and did the same kind on ram, back & ram to open the roads. At the time the county only had a couple road graders with vee plows, and it took nearly a week sometimes to get all the roads reopened. Later years, like after the 1967 'Great Blizzard', they provided some old vee plows to farmers owning some of the early articulated tractors. That helped open the roads much quicker. But, I recall a few times when a payloader was the tool of choice. I think they tried a rotary plow once, but never bought one for themselves -- probably 'ate' too many mailboxes, etc.

John in NW Indiana

I remember in the late 70's in Michigan we use to get some snow and this was common to see 2 plow trucks coupled together with a big V plow on the front and they weren't stopping for anything :)

Robo
12-31-2012, 07:20 PM
I came across this one up in Marquette, MI. Wife said "Where would you park it?". I didn't bother calling the number. Darn logic.
http://www-personal.umich.edu/~panchula/snowblower.jpg

What a machine that is!!! Would love to run that rig for a few days in some serious snow :) I wonder how much HP that unit has?

uncle pete
12-31-2012, 07:33 PM
Willy,
LOL, Yeah me too. Maybe it was the same fool? And I really was amazed at the sound too, I'll never forget it. I didn't expect the guy to survive never mind drive out from under all the melting ice, snow, salt and so called "sand" I was throwing. He even drove into Argos yard just to bitch about what a poor operator I was and was threatening to sue. I figured an easy 8-10 grand in damage to that olds he was driving. All this was going on at about 50 ++++ mph. I did pinch another "braniac" trying to pass where he shouldn't between the end of a 12 G's wing and a curb at an intersection here in town while making a turn with the wing down. I almost felt guilty looking at how narrow that car got.

But you also didn't mention the shear joy of hitting a unknown high section in a road with the underbody down and then finding out your front tires aren't steering anymore once the spring gets compressed. An instant sphincter tightening eye opening jolt hard enough to give you whiplash on night shift.;)

But watching that video was just mind blowing. I'm positive your right about that being a promotional film. The driver and truck would be out of action till spring after one shift. No air ride seats, power steering, square cut tranny gears? Thanks................... but no thanks.

Pete

tryfred
12-31-2012, 08:57 PM
"What a machine that is!!! Would love to run that rig for a few days in some serious snow. I wonder how much HP that unit has?"


If memory serves me well…I believe that is an Oshkosh. I did a ride along on one many years ago... down the Niagara Falls Airport runway…second best ride I ever had out there. There are two engines, one for the truck and the other for the blower…about 1200 hp each…

Joe

panchula
12-31-2012, 09:57 PM
"What a machine that is!!! Would love to run that rig for a few days in some serious snow. I wonder how much HP that unit has?"


If memory serves me well…I believe that is an Oshkosh. I did a ride along on one many years ago... down the Niagara Falls Airport runway…second best ride I ever had out there. There are two engines, one for the truck and the other for the blower…about 1200 hp each…

Joe

Yup, it was an Oshkosh. I wonder how many gallons per mile it got?

-Mike