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View Full Version : Semi OT - Wood Working Project: A Christmas Gift (Easily made in machine shop!)



Fasttrack
01-02-2013, 10:21 PM
Made a tabletop game for my BIL who is recovering from an operation and has to avoid strenuous activity for about a month. This was my first "fine" wood working project. Up until now, everything I've done was either trim work in my bathroom or dimensional lumber (e.g. building work benches and the like). All in all, I'm pretty pleased with the outcome. I designed it and built it in two days. If I had it to do over again, I'd make some changes but that's what happens when you wing it.

It was made using basic tools: drill press, circular saw, etc. I did borrow my father's router table to put the roman ogee profile on the playing quadrants. The quadrants are solid 3/4" oak and the rest of the visible stuff is oak plywood or trim. The "core" consists of two pieces of 3/4" OSB laminated together. This provides a warp free, thick substrate for quadrants to pivot about. The surface directly under the quadrants is 1/8" hardboard that has been painted black. The quadrants are attached to a 1" oak dowel rod that passes through the OSB. This was all made from remnants from my bathroom remodel (except the solid oak quadrants). The oak plywood I purchased to make a medicine cabinet which I finally did tonight.

Not much to it, really. The drawers pull all the way out so you can dump them over to quickly get the pieces out. The pieces are drawer pulls from Hobby Lobby. They are painted with thinned acrylic paint and then toweled dry so the wood grain shows through the color. Everything got a couple of coats of satin polyurethane. Underneath the 1" dowels are some fender washers to keep the players from accidentally pulling the quadrants all the way out of the game structure/box thing.

Sadly, my rotary phase converter isn't up and running yet so all the holes were drilled by hand. I thought I would post this, though, since it would be a really easy project for any of us with a mill. You could probably even do the profiling in the mill although chip out on the end grain/corners may be pretty bad at low (i.e., milling machine) speeds. There was nothing I did that couldn't be done with a milling machine and a circular saw. I suppose you might not even need a circular saw if you cut the pieces out in your mill!

Rules: http://www.pentago.se/ENRules.pdf

Pictures:
(Don't mind the dust ... I was sanding another project and it got coated in dust. It's actually a nice satin finish and not at all blotchy)

http://i108.photobucket.com/albums/n22/fasttrack237/Wood%20Working/P1040643_zpsee3bce2f.jpg

http://i108.photobucket.com/albums/n22/fasttrack237/Wood%20Working/P1040645_zps89a87364.jpg

http://i108.photobucket.com/albums/n22/fasttrack237/Wood%20Working/P1040638_zpsc579583c.jpg

http://i108.photobucket.com/albums/n22/fasttrack237/Wood%20Working/P1040637_zps778bff37.jpg

RetiredFAE
01-02-2013, 10:30 PM
Nice work!

taydin
01-03-2013, 02:04 PM
That is beautifully made! I suspect that a metalworking background makes one a better woodworker, maybe because subconsciously you're still working to metalworking level accuracy.

Jaakko Fagerlund
01-03-2013, 03:36 PM
That is beautifully made! I suspect that a metalworking background makes one a better woodworker, maybe because subconsciously you're still working to metalworking level accuracy.
I would like to disagree. I have miserably disappointed many times in my woodworks as for example leaving 5-15 mm room around a door and a frame so it operates properly just doesn't fit in my mind :D I'm nearly whipping out a micromete when doing wood stuff and I hate the wood swolling from water etc and needing a finish on it to protect it better. And that reminds me of painting...

Fasttrack
01-08-2013, 10:14 PM
I would like to disagree. I have miserably disappointed many times in my woodworks as for example leaving 5-15 mm room around a door and a frame so it operates properly just doesn't fit in my mind :D I'm nearly whipping out a micromete when doing wood stuff and I hate the wood swolling from water etc and needing a finish on it to protect it better. And that reminds me of painting...


Hah! I know what you mean. It took me a long time to get the hang of finishing drywall. I was really anal about the smallest imperfection on the surface ... the typical routine was put on joint compound - sand it off - check with straightedge - put on more compound - sand it off - check with straightedge - repeat ad nauseam. Then I wised up to the fact that it was getting painted with typical interior paints and not gloss black lacquer.

Thanks for the kind words, folks!

chip's
01-09-2013, 12:19 AM
You did very well for a first time! It looks excellent, nice work!