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View Full Version : Parallel's, recommendations and grinding wheels.



TeaMan
01-12-2013, 09:02 PM
I want to get a set of parallel's to go with my vise and am wondering if anyone has any recommendations. The vise has 1-3/8" deep jaws and I'm not sure where I'd used them except to raise something in the vise jaws. I saw a set on the enco web site that are 4 pairs in sizes 1/2, 5/8, 3/4, and 7/8". They are in the $20 range, the next set up has the same sizes, plus 1, 1-1/8, 1-1/4, 1-3/8, 1-1/2 and 1-5/8" and the price jumps to the $60 range. Any reason I'd want anything over 7/8", especially wider than the depth of my vise jaws?

Enco is running free shipping through January so I'm looking at getting a few things from them to save in the shipping. I'm still confused on what kind of wheels to get for my grinder. It doesn't mean that I can get what I really need, but if I can, it would help me out with shipping.

This is what I found. What advice can I get with this?
6" Ceramic Alumina /Aluminum oxide blend, Grit 80-K (Tru-Maxx)
6" Ceramic Alumina /Aluminum oxide blend, Grit 60-K (Tru-Maxx)
6" Aluminum oxide, Grit 120 (Tru-Maxx)
6" Aluminum oxide, Grit 60 (Tru-Maxx)

Thanks,
TeaMan

Denny98501
01-12-2013, 10:40 PM
I want to get a set of parallel's to go with my vise and am wondering if anyone has any recommendations. The vise has 1-3/8" deep jaws and I'm not sure where I'd used them except to raise something in the vise jaws. I saw a set on the enco web site that are 4 pairs in sizes 1/2, 5/8, 3/4, and 7/8". They are in the $20 range, the next set up has the same sizes, plus 1, 1-1/8, 1-1/4, 1-3/8, 1-1/2 and 1-5/8" and the price jumps to the $60 range. Any reason I'd want anything over 7/8", especially wider than the depth of my vise jaws?
Thanks,
TeaMan

You will want blocks that can take you very near the top of the vise. Let's say that you have a piece of 3/8" thick plate and you want to put a bevel or radius all the way around it. With the taller parallels, you can leave 1/4 inch sticking up. For the $40 difference in price, I would get the shorter parallels and a couple of pairs of 1-2-3 blocks and use the blocks for the first inch. If you will be radiusing small stock that precludes the use of the 1-2-3 blocks, you will need the more expensive set of parallels.

Hope this helps,
Dennis

macona
01-12-2013, 11:39 PM
Get the full set, you will need them.

+ or - Zero
01-13-2013, 08:40 AM
Get the full set, you will need them.

macona called that right, except also get (if you don't already have them), 123 blocks and V blocks, angle blocks, and every other bloody block you can possibly afford.

Yeah, some of them may just sit around with you thinking "hummm, wonder why I bought that?". Right up until you really need it, then in one shot it will change to "D...n glad I bought that, it just paid for it's self in spades, even if it now just spends the next 10 years sitting around".

That's the problem with shorting yourself in the beginning --you'll have just enough stuff to end up tied up for want of something you could have bought as a set at the start.

I understand non of us are made of money, but it's still good advice anyway --just get the best you can every time, it pays. And not a thing wrong with making stuff your self, so long as you can with the required degree of true.

TeaMan
01-13-2013, 03:42 PM
Thanks for the replies on the parallels. I suspect you're right, more is better and the advice on the blocks is also good. Need to see how much I can afford.

Any advice on the grinding wheels? They will be primarily for grinding HSS. I'm finding my machine is limited in power and speed and even though carbides will work at slower speeds, I don't have the power to drive them very deep so they may not be the best bang for the buck. It also seems that HSS may offer more flexibility being able to reshape, rather than needing a special carbide. Not that I know what I'm talking about, but it's what I've gleened from reading and others that seem to know what you're talking about.

TeaMan

JoeFin
01-13-2013, 05:15 PM
Buy some Norton grinding wheels and make your own parallels

Unless of course you want the fancy plastic case - then of course you could always grab a set at HappyFart and dust them off on the grinder to make sure they are straight, plumb, and of course parallel

Co2 mech
01-13-2013, 05:30 PM
I used to use O1 flat ground for paralells, but found some spring steel from McMaster and surface ground it parallel. Quite an improvement with the hardness and the price. The grinding wheel recomendation is to visit the Norton website and look through their information on grades, grits and hardness. aA little education goes a long way.
Regards

TeaMan
01-14-2013, 02:02 PM
OK, did some reading on the Norton site. They say Premium White Aluminum Oxide for Tool Steel and Silicon Carbide for Carbides. Since I may get some carbides eventually, I'm looking at 4 wheels.

1- Premium White Aluminum Oxide (60 grit)
1- Premium White Aluminum Oxide (100 grit)
1- Silicon Carbide (80 grit)
1- Silicon Carbide (120 grit)

Look OK?

TeaMan

+ or - Zero
01-14-2013, 03:57 PM
OK, did some reading on the Norton site. They say Premium White Aluminum Oxide for Tool Steel and Silicon Carbide for Carbides. Since I may get some carbides eventually, I'm looking at 4 wheels.

1- Premium White Aluminum Oxide (60 grit)
1- Premium White Aluminum Oxide (100 grit)
1- Silicon Carbide (80 grit)
1- Silicon Carbide (120 grit)

Look OK?

TeaMan

Probably as good as any (someone with strong brand loyalty may come along, and I have nothing to offer on that). But I'd say you need at least two grinders --you will not want to be changing wheels back and forth. I have several grinders, mostly because they do pile up over the years, but they stay in use because I find there are several uses (wire wheels, buffing, etc.) as well as the two main green wheel grinder and HHS grinder for lathe cutters. And then there are the grey wheel grinders for general shop use.

After awhile you begin to notice there are a lot of uses for "grinders" --and we haven't started on the various angle grinders and their cousins... or the surface grinders... sigh.

Co2 mech
01-14-2013, 05:49 PM
The wheels come in different hardnesses too. you have to match the wheel hardness to the material hardness. The harder the material the softer the wheel. The softer wheel will cut harder material faster and the harder wheel will cut softer material faster.
Regards

Ron of Va
01-14-2013, 06:00 PM
http://www.tools4cheap.net/proddetail.php?prod=14thinpar
Set of 9 pairs of parallels in case. 1/4" thick x 6" long. Heights range from 3/4" to 1-3/4"
Parallel to .0002" $50..

bob308
01-14-2013, 08:17 PM
when i was learning tool making i made my own also made my own boreing bars our of broken carbide. made a set of 4 1x2x3 blocks. made it out of a2 then would send it along with a job that had to be hardened.

.RC.
01-14-2013, 08:47 PM
I would get a 38 or 46 grit wheel and just get a $15 diamond wheel to use for the final polish of the edge...

You certainly do not want anything finer then a 60... You will just cook the edge you are grinding as you attempt to rough out your piece of HSS...