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jcaldwell
01-13-2013, 04:00 PM
The guy I bought my mill from owned a machine shop and said he always used a misting coolant when cutting materials. The mister looks very simple. It seems to have a pickup in a container of the coolant mix that goes to a venturi nozzle on the air hose that goes to the cutting area.

I imagine that the misting coolant is less messy than spraying regular liquid coolant, but it likely still makes a big mess.

What does everyone do for cooling cutters? Nothing? Mist coolant? Liquid coolant? Air only?

Thanks,

JC

derekm
01-13-2013, 04:15 PM
flood ... that way i dont breathe it in
castrol excel

Toolguy
01-13-2013, 04:25 PM
Mist is very bad for your health plus it ends up settling on everything in the area, making a big mess. Either flood or just put a dab of oil where you need it (drilling & tapping for example) is the way to go.

JoeFin
01-13-2013, 05:04 PM
I have a mist coolant system that came on my cnc mill but I always run flood on it. Been thinking of moving the mist coolant over to the lathe where it might be much more useful

Scottike
01-13-2013, 05:18 PM
I have a mist coolant setup that I move between my lathe and mill, but I always
setup a fan to blow the mist away from me and crack open the door and a window or two so I don't have
to breathe it too much.
My goal is to eventually have flood systems on both machines, but any coolant is better than none.

robosilo
01-13-2013, 09:57 PM
+1 for flood. It's simple and effective enough for most applications unless you are consistently running RPM's above 8,000 Mist has the advantage of being able to force it's way down into pockets and flutes when the RPMs are very high. With flood, you assume the coolant is getting where it needs to go but if the tool or SFM is high enough the coolant i just spun away. Boeing is big on mist because they claim they go through less coolant, but they have some very complex mist collectors for health reasons and to make sure they don't lose any of the coolant. Also, don't use "coolmist". That stuff is rubbish and i seems is mostly food coloring.

I'm sure you could make a simple mist collector from a blower fan and cyclone filter but i wouldn't do that unless the machine has guards that can contain the mist long enough to be collected, otherwise it just get everywhere.

good luck

MichaelP
01-14-2013, 01:25 AM
I don't use flood cooling in my home shop although my lathe is equipped with one. It's the best, of course, but a way too messy. Most often, I use cutting oil on a small brush and WD40 spray for aluminum or cut dry. Sometimes I use microdrip on my lathe, mist or cold air on the mill, saw and surface grinder.

macona
01-14-2013, 02:11 AM
I use microdrop systems on both the cnc mill and cnc lathe. They are nice, they dont make the atomized mist like a venturi system does and it does not make a freeking mess.

MrFluffy
01-14-2013, 03:31 AM
Flood on the mill, & a can with a paintbrush in it with soluble oil in the can stuck to the tailstock by a magnet on the lathe. But it will be liquid when I get round to building a setup again. I used to run a fishtank pump in the small suds container but it got broken when a chuck squashed it.

I just built a flood coolant setup for the grinder too. Suds pump mounted on a old square caravan grey water tank, just waiting on the boat bulkhead waterproof plug to turn up (socket already on machine) to wire it in. I'm hoping liquid coolant will keep less of the spoil from being airborne and make cleanup easier.

robosilo
01-14-2013, 03:35 AM
Macona: how does your microdrop system perform when milling pockets? Do you have any issues with surface finish since the chips aren't being flushed away? Thanks

EVguru
01-14-2013, 08:21 AM
Do you have any issues with surface finish since the chips aren't being flushed away? Thanks

The idea with most of these 'no fog' systems is that an air blast gives the cooling/chip clearing function and that small drops of oil are metered into the air as a cutting lubricant.

Dr Stan
01-14-2013, 08:29 AM
+2, 3, 4 . . . on flood. Remember working at one shop that used mist and was constantly fighting upper respiratory problems.

I'm building my own flood unit for my lathe, a small submersible pump from Home Depot, a 5 gal bucket, mist tubing, piping,etc. I'm using the flex spout from a funnel as the flexible end of the piping. I'm also using oil based rather than water based coolant to help avoid skin irritation and bacterial contamination of the coolant. I'll do the same for my mill and will use a drip unit for my horizontal saw. Set up an aquarium pump on my vertical just to blow air on the blade. I also use paraffin on the vert saw when I'm doing much cutting.

Ed P
01-14-2013, 08:46 AM
+2, 3, 4 . . . on flood.
I'm building my own flood unit for my lathe, a small submersible pump from Home Depot, a 5 gal bucket, mist tubing, piping,etc. I'm also using oil based rather than water based coolant.

What about odor? I've used oil based coolant, actually thread cutting lubricant from Lowes/HomeDepot and it stinks. I have to clean it all up after using it.

Ed P

MrFluffy
01-14-2013, 08:53 AM
What about odor? I've used oil based coolant, actually thread cutting lubricant from Lowes/HomeDepot and it stinks. I have to clean it all up after using it.

Ed P
Machinists aftershave :)

Boucher
01-14-2013, 09:09 AM
Not all misters work the same. The Venturi type with cool mist was fogging the shop up and breathing the vapor was making me sick. I built a unit similar to the Bjur mister.
http://i109.photobucket.com/albums/n50/boucherbyron/IMG_0255Small.jpg
It blows air with a minimum of oil drops in the stream and produces less breathable vapor. Some smoke is produced but that doesn't bother me the way the cool mist vapor did. This shows the delivery nozzle.
http://i109.photobucket.com/albums/n50/boucherbyron/IMG_0256Small.jpg
The small amount of oil used is captured with these small bottles on each end of the table.
http://i109.photobucket.com/albums/n50/boucherbyron/IMG_0248Small.jpg
I am still playing around with using the shop vac to capture the cuttings and move them out of the cutting zone.
http://i109.photobucket.com/albums/n50/boucherbyron/IMG_0054.jpg
The final solution for me is probably going to involve the combination of a larger more powerfull vacuum outside the shop with a Cyclone swarf seperator inside and the Bjur Clone.

Toolguy
01-14-2013, 10:45 AM
What about odor? I've used oil based coolant, actually thread cutting lubricant from Lowes/HomeDepot and it stinks. I have to clean it all up after using it. Ed P

Most water soluble coolants start to go bad when they get way lube mixed in. The sulfur in the way lube is often the problem. Thread cutting oil often has sulfur in it too. This causes a cycle of bacteria growth which then requires a bacteria killing additive in the coolant and makes the shop an unpleasant place to be.
I have found a coolant made by Hangsterfer's (I'm using S-555) that works great and has none of these problems when used with their coolant-compatible way lube. There is no smell and no maintenance except to keep the right ratio of water to coolant. I am using the same coolant in 2 CNC mills, surface grinder and band saw. I have been using this mix since 1999 with no smell or problems whatever. You just add more water or more coolant to get the mix right and you're done. It takes a few minutes once a week.

Dr Stan
01-14-2013, 01:30 PM
What about odor? I've used oil based coolant, actually thread cutting lubricant from Lowes/HomeDepot and it stinks. I have to clean it all up after using it.

Ed P

I'm old school so I like the smell of petroleum based cutting fluids.