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aostling
01-18-2013, 11:58 AM
Any one of us could have invented this, but somebody else did. I assume the Y-Tube is an aluminum extrusion. How would you have made a prototype?

From http://www.dpreview.com/news/2013/01/18/giottos-introduces-ytl-series-tripods-with-space-saving-design


http://i168.photobucket.com/albums/u183/aostling/ytube2_zps20e8caf5.jpg

Lew Hartswick
01-18-2013, 01:34 PM
Unless youre transporting it to Mars or at least the space station, WHY would
anyone be concerned enough about the tiny amount of "space" or "weight"
saved by so complicated construction????????
Just another "invention" for the sake of being "new". :-(
...lew...

LKeithR
01-18-2013, 02:07 PM
Unless youre transporting it to Mars or at least the space station, WHY would
anyone be concerned enough about the tiny amount of "space" or "weight"
saved by so complicated construction????????
Just another "invention" for the sake of being "new". :-(
...lew...

Yup, whether you're a "Camera Geek", a "Machinery Geek" or a "Car Geek" it's the "gimmicks" that'll get you every time. A lot of people will "want" one of those; only a few will "need" one...

cameron
01-18-2013, 02:42 PM
Not exactly a "tiny" amount of space saved, the enclosed cross-sectional area of the folded pod is about half or less of the other. Also , the closer spacing of the legs results in a smaller tribrach at the top, which should make for greater stiffness of the setup.

Do many people need this? Of course not, most fancy photography gear is sold to people who want it, not to people who need it. Not unlike the situation in our group here.

charlie gary
01-18-2013, 07:54 PM
When it all has to fit on the back seat of a motorcycle, every cubic centimeter counts.

brian Rupnow
01-18-2013, 08:47 PM
Aostling---If you have a good 3D cad program and know how to use it, you don't need to make a prototype. I have 2 or 3 customers who periodically fax or email me a sketch of some new product that they have had an idea for, and want me to model it up as an extrusion. I model it up as an extrusion, save a 2D drawing of it as a .dxf file, and send it off to the extruders. They use the math data embedded in the .dxf file to build a die. The price for aluminum extrusion dies ranges from $1200 for non complex parts up to $20,000 for complex parts. If my customer puts in an order for a large enough quantity of extrusion, the extruder will build the dies free. (I'm sure its not "free" but the cost of the die gets rolled into the cost of "product".)--I have had extrusions made for everything from water cooled battery boxes for lithium-ion batteries on New York busses to parts for boat docks and medical instruments.---One funny result of this---Every year at Christmas time, the aluminum extrusion company I deal with makes up a die for an extruded Christmas tree ornament. They extrude using a continuous extrusion process and part the extrusion off about every 3/8" as it solidifies and then send the cut off parts for colorfull anodizing. I have been getting all of these amazing, intricate Christmas tree ornaments for about 10 years now.---Brian

lakeside53
01-18-2013, 09:03 PM
Any one of us could have invented this, but somebody else did. I assume the Y-Tube is an aluminum extrusion. How would you have made a prototype?

From http://www.dpreview.com/news/2013/01/18/giottos-introduces-ytl-series-tripods-with-space-saving-design


http://i168.photobucket.com/albums/u183/aostling/ytube2_zps20e8caf5.jpg

Production is another question...

Prototype? easy... mill the center section out of solid Al (billet of course ;) )

Or.. if you are trying to make it "light', mill it from wood and paint black. Can be remarkably convincing.

OR... tig three pieces of inverted tube sections togther, mill/sand off the welds, and paint

aostling
01-18-2013, 09:47 PM
The price for aluminum extrusion dies ranges from $1200 for non complex parts up to $20,000 for complex parts.

That's a reasonable price. If extrusions can be made straight enough for nested telescoping this might facilitate the suggestion by Amnon G, in the comments section following the dpreview article:



Why not take that one step further and make the shape of the tripod almost cylindrical when closed? Instead of using circular legs use different shape legs, for example half circles or ovals.

elf
01-18-2013, 10:07 PM
Will that center section be more rigid or less rigid than the tube?

Lew Hartswick
01-18-2013, 10:14 PM
Why not take that one step further and make the shape of the tripod almost cylindrical when closed? Instead of using circular legs use different shape legs, for example half circles or ovals.

Obvious to me. They are saving that for the next "great improvement". :-)
...lew...

aostling
01-18-2013, 11:20 PM
Will that center section be more rigid or less rigid than the tube?

According to a comment under the original dpreview article it would be less rigid. But tabletop tripods don't really need a center section. All they need is two telescoping sections for each of the three legs.

That suggests a cross-section like this, consisting only of three legs (each a 120 sector), no center section, and a ball head on top.

http://i168.photobucket.com/albums/u183/aostling/Screenshot2013-01-18at91507PM_zps440101ec.png

macona
01-19-2013, 02:51 AM
Unless youre transporting it to Mars or at least the space station, WHY would
anyone be concerned enough about the tiny amount of "space" or "weight"
saved by so complicated construction????????
Just another "invention" for the sake of being "new". :-(
...lew...

You have never carried a big tripod around, have you? The one on the left is like my Gitzo, not fun to carry more than you have to.

Paul Alciatore
01-19-2013, 03:43 AM
Would you care to explain exactly what principal of engineering or science you think makes the "setup" stiffer for the smaller tripod? I would think that the larger one would be stiffer because if they have the same amount of play in the joints, the smaller one would rotate side to side by a larger angle than the larger one.

Paul A.



Not exactly a "tiny" amount of space saved, the enclosed cross-sectional area of the folded pod is about half or less of the other. Also , the closer spacing of the legs results in a smaller tribrach at the top, which should make for greater stiffness of the setup.

Do many people need this? Of course not, most fancy photography gear is sold to people who want it, not to people who need it. Not unlike the situation in our group here.