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high country
01-20-2013, 02:13 PM
I have a 10 ton punch press sitting around and would like to explore the idea of building a die to form fishing lures, spoons specifically. Any advice would be greatly appreciated. I have a mill, lathe, surface grinder and loads of hand tools to work with. Most of my machine shop experience stems from automotive machine work and gun smithing.....so excuse me for not being quite as savvy as some of you here.

Thanks,
Greg.

smalltime
01-20-2013, 02:33 PM
I have a 10 ton punch press sitting around and would like to explore the idea of building a die to form fishing lures, spoons specifically. Any advice would be greatly appreciated. I have a mill, lathe, surface grinder and loads of hand tools to work with. Most of my machine shop experience stems from automotive machine work and gun smithing.....so excuse me for not being quite as savvy as some of you here.

Thanks,
Greg.

You first need to decide exactly what it is you want to make. Size, thickness, type of material, holes,forming,and in your case, surface finish (Peened finish). All of these things need to be known before you start designing and building a die.

When you decide those things, then you can start the design process.

Toolguy
01-20-2013, 02:45 PM
You have all the tools you need except knowledge. Get a book about punch press dies. There is too much involved to write it all here.
A 10 ton press is pretty light. You will have to stick with thin material, probably .03 to .04 max. You will have to make at least 2 dies, one blank, one form and one pierce or you can just drill the holes. Once you build a couple of dies you will see it isn't that hard but you do have to hold close tolerances. A DRO on the mill makes this way easier than leadscrew dials. This is probably well within your skill set once you see how it goes. Plan on having to redo a few things at the beginning to get it right. There is still a need for good die makers in case you need to earn some extra cash down the road.

shawnspeed
01-20-2013, 03:29 PM
After doing some prototype work back in the '90's...you may want to look at making plastic or epoxy dies....cost way less, and my bet would be with the shallow depth of a spoon, it would last quite some time...we used to buy a 5 gallon pail of epoxy fortified with iron, for a couple hundred bucks...you would need way less...and yes we were stamping steel 16ga parts for a exhaust system(2-1, collector in 2 halves) and got over 100 parts out of the die, and it looked like it would be good for a couple of hundred more...we were using a 20T hydraulic press, but I do not see why you couldn't set one up in an OBI style press....as aside note..I tried to clean up the backside of one of the dies with a flycutter...HSS....didn't make it across a 6" die before wearing a flat on the tool..I had to use carbide....http://www.toolchemical.com/c-586-surface-mass-casting-systems.aspx
Hope the link works....you should be able to find a supplier in your area considering the airplane business in that area...Shawn

high country
01-20-2013, 03:31 PM
Thanks. I wasn't quite sure if the peening could be accomplished at the same time as the forming. I have only built a couple dies for forming and it was years ago, and I was forming .250" mild.

I was thinking of using brass to ease the load on the press....and I do have a dro on all my mill and lathe.

high country
01-20-2013, 03:33 PM
Shawn.....that is quite interesting.....thanks.

shawnspeed
01-20-2013, 08:33 PM
Your welcome....that stuff has nearly killed the kirksite die business in the automotive sector....a alot of prototype stuff is now stamped on plastic dies..Shawn