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View Full Version : Photos to Identify please - Dad's lathe, accessories, other items Part 1



Freedom2be
03-26-2013, 01:05 PM
Based on my prior post http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/threads/58490-Atlas-10-inch-metal-lathe-with-quick-change/page3

Folks here asked to see more photos of what is in Dad's workshop. Dad has recently moved in to a nursing home, and I need to work on clearing things out. I request some help identifying stuff, and figuring out which parts go with what.

First, we have the Atlas 10 inch metal lathe.
Photo number 48. Someone had asked what is it on? Not the stand, but a table Dad made with drawers and bottom shelf (all full, of course!)
http://i133.photobucket.com/albums/q57/sfsamm/2013/Lathe%20and%20cellar%20items%20Mar%2019/IMG_5948Small_zps60fad9ce.jpg

Photo Number 44. I suspect some of the items in this drawer go WITH the lathe?
http://i133.photobucket.com/albums/q57/sfsamm/2013/Lathe%20and%20cellar%20items%20Mar%2019/IMG_5944Small_zpse25cfd65.jpg

Photo Number 45. One other drawer. Recognize anything that goes with the lathe?
http://i133.photobucket.com/albums/q57/sfsamm/2013/Lathe%20and%20cellar%20items%20Mar%2019/IMG_5945Small_zps2a8d3f8e.jpg

Photo 46. Another drawer.
http://i133.photobucket.com/albums/q57/sfsamm/2013/Lathe%20and%20cellar%20items%20Mar%2019/IMG_5946Small_zps08cf570c.jpg



More photos to come: they are in a separate thread, here: http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/threads/58591-Photos-to-Identify-please-Dad-s-lathe-accessories-other-items-Part-2

J Tiers
03-26-2013, 09:34 PM
Photo 44...
most of that goes with, I'd just include it all. I see a chuck, toolpost wrench, cutters, tool holders, at least one center drill, a "fishtail" thread tool gage, taper adapters, a chuck wrench, drilling rest, etc.

Photo 45
maybe... photo is fuzzy. The thing at right that is a cylindrical tube with teeth on one end is a hole saw. it and any others like it would go with the drill, or get sold as a set.
Can't tell what is in the loops on side of drawer..... could be drills, maybe reamers, ????? A case of "you gotta be there".


Photo 46.
The spiral pointy thing is a reamer that goes with the pipe threading stuff. Just above it is a drill chuck that may or may not have a taper that fits the lathe. Other stuff is mostly hidden, dunno what it is.
.
.
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What you have is a mess.... charitably called a puzzle. You absolutely cannot handle it without some organization and method.

With situations like this, you need to find a big open flat area.... or a lot of boxes..... You start at one side and go through everything. When you find something like the hole saw, you put it somewhere on your flat area. Every time you find another one like it, you put it with the ones you already found.

Pretty soon you are getting things sorted out.

The good thing about that is that you do NOT even need to know anything about the stuff. If you start putting things that seem alike together, you will save whoever you get to help you a LOT of time...... They can come and see your groups, sort out whatever errors you may have made (there will be some no doubt), and get things identified. Then you can decide what to do.

Rule number one:
Look at anything you don't understand, and try to decide if it looks like it was made like it is on purpose..... is it smoothly finished? even if it is intended to be rough like a file, you can tell it was made like that for a reason.

That one rule can help sort junk from "things".

In case of doubt, put stuff you don't know about in it's own pile... someone will know.

Old wire, and other fairly obvious junk can be set aside in a barrel or box.

All the old bolts etc can be set aside also.

Try not to throw away anything until it has been positively identified as junk. That is the first rule of people who run estate sales.... they tell the family not to throw out anything first.... In one case I know the family had bags of "old paper trash" that they were going to toss before the sale people got there.
Those bags of "paper trash" had collectible stuff in it that sold for a total of over $500.........

And, as a matter of fact..... you might do worse than to check out estate sale companies..... There must be some. They KNOW what to do, they handle the whole thing, and it's in their interest to get as much as possible for it. Find one that can handle tools OK..... not all of them have a clue.

It's OK to do some sorting before they come to check out the place, that may help them..... just no throwing out.

sasquatch
03-26-2013, 09:44 PM
Again,, also very good advice!

Freedom2be
03-26-2013, 10:52 PM
Thanks, J Tiers. That helps. It all looks like "a bunch of Dad's stuff" to me! Ha ha haaa.

J Tiers
03-27-2013, 12:22 AM
I know all about that....... the "its HUUUUGE" reaction... just before the glaze-over when everything looks alike.

Once you start seeing the pieces as individual things with a shape and surfaces, etc, you are getting in "tune". You can say "oh, this is like that one". No need to know how to use them.

One at a time you can deal with it. A big pile-o-stuff is plain scary until you pick it up piece by piece.


It evens out.....

I look at the accessory "feet" for my wife's sewing machine, and THEY all look alike to ME... all funny little gizmos... not to her, of course, each does a different thing. But, I can send her to get a half-inch combination wrench, and she'll come back with the right thing.... She knows more about my machines and tools than I do about hers.

The Artful Bodger
03-27-2013, 01:24 AM
JT's advice is good, especially sorting into pile of 'lookalikes'. However when you get those piles take pictures and show there here as I would hate to think someone get a nice set of micrometers in with a pile of G clamps (for example)!

lakeside53
03-27-2013, 01:50 AM
Unless you intend to keep it... don't bother sorting; sell the entire mess as a lot.

J Tiers
03-27-2013, 08:24 AM
Unless you intend to keep it... don't bother sorting; sell the entire mess as a lot.

The ONE problem with that is the enormous discount you will have to give.

You will have no idea what is in it, and likely the only offers will be scrappers who will be paying for it (if they will pay at all) on the basis that all of it is just broken scrap metal. So many cents per pound, and since you won't be weighing it, you may not even get that. You'll get the place "cleared", but you will probably take a severe "haircut" on the sale price, if you can get ANY "price".

if you are interested in having your dad's stuff go to people who will keep using it, that's not the way to go. Ditto if you would like to get the best price for it, which amounts to the same thing. Most scrappers take it on the basis of "we clear the place for free, our pay is when we sell it." They can't pay close to scrap value, that's all THEY can get, after the work of carrying it away.

If you just need to clear the property as soon as possible of "all that junk" then go ahead.

Just by selling the lathe, and not one other thing, you will probably realize more money than if you sold the lot to the scrappers. And you can still scrap the junk.

Scrappers love old wire, ...... copper is popular, even though the price for insulated wire is lower, and many junk dealers won't take wire which has had the insulation burned off.

lakeside53
03-27-2013, 11:10 AM
I'm not talking "scrappers" and no disrespect to anyones DAD here, but the only thing I see of any value is the lathe and couple of closely associated items (that go with the lathe). To be clear... I'd sell the lathe at "market" and throw in the rest. Just advertise it as "Lathe and tooling", and don't take the first offer - hold out for a week or more.

I've bought many things like that - I haul it all home then toss out most of the junk or trade it with buddies. Sometime's I wonder why..

Freedom2be
03-27-2013, 02:25 PM
I know all about that....... the "its HUUUUGE" reaction... just before the glaze-over when everything looks alike.
Once you start seeing the pieces as individual things with a shape and surfaces, etc, you are getting in "tune". You can say "oh, this is like that one". No need to know how to use them.

One at a time you can deal with it. A big pile-o-stuff is plain scary until you pick it up piece by piece.


It evens out.....

I look at the accessory "feet" for my wife's sewing machine, and THEY all look alike to ME... all funny little gizmos... not to her, of course, each does a different thing. But, I can send her to get a half-inch combination wrench, and she'll come back with the right thing.... She knows more about my machines and tools than I do about hers.

The stuff I am stuck on, like the lathe, Dad has not used it since I was about 10 years old. I have already brought the 8 drills (WHY anyone needs EIGHT when we only have 2 hands, I have yet to discover), drill bits, and 2 sanders here to my house, I use those, as a home owner. But so much of it I can't even recall seeing him use it, so that is where I am stuck.

sasquatch
03-27-2013, 05:20 PM
re: Why anyone needs 8 drills:

That is so you don't have to change drill bit sizes, just grab another drill!!!:rolleyes:

That is part of what this tool, addiction is about, can't resist having an extra one. I see guys, and there would be some here, with 5-6 lathes, 5-6 drill presses, one guy i see has like 14 bench grinders,,,, (All oldies restored of course!)- (Your'e dad would have been a great neighbour!!)

Freedom2be
03-27-2013, 06:06 PM
LOL, oh OK. He he heee So basically, it is one for each step in the job!

1-800miner
03-27-2013, 06:39 PM
Now you are catching on! I told you it was an addiction.
Now you see how eight drills are needed. Next thing is to think about the lathe as drill #9.
Soon after that you will have "senior member" under your screen name.:)

john hobdeclipe
03-27-2013, 07:05 PM
I was beginning to feel really bad, knowing that I only have 4 drills. Then I realized that I have 9 routers. This is the "slippery slope" you hear so much about. It's also steep. Enjoy the ride.

Wheeeee!

Freedom2be
03-27-2013, 07:58 PM
I found a router MANUAL, but have yet to find the router, lol. :)

BadDog
03-27-2013, 08:21 PM
About the drills, think of it this way. Imagine doing a nice job on some heavy wood work running heavy screws. Maybe one with a small long bit for the pilot hole so the long screw doesn't get too hard to run, or split the wood. Another for a clearance hole so the jacking effect (minimized by pilot anyway) of passing from top to bottom board doesn't cause excessive spacing and instead pulls very tight. Then a third drill has a counter sink with depth stop so you get nice neat counter-sunk heads. And perhaps you have 2 different screw sizes, so now we are up to 6 total. Perhaps you also need to drill some holes in steel brackets, so that's another different type/size of bit. Having several can be very important if we don't want to swap bits till our fingers bleed. Counting all, I have at least 6 common hand drill motors, probably more if I think and look around a bit. And I know for a fact I've had at least 4 in use at one time.

This is the same reason I have 6 4.5" angle grinders with 2 more "spares" in boxes on a shelf. And when working on steel fabrication projects I guarantee I've had them all in rapid rotation many times. I also have 3 common bench grinders in 6" and 7" wheel diameters (plus a carbide grinder!) with different wheels in all positions.

You can easily imagine more. And thus I explain my hoarding, er, collection tendencies...

As for sorting it all out, I agree with others to get someone over that knows their way around such shops. Let them have all the fasteners and other minor items they care to haul away (I have piles of that stuff, and never have everything I need), maybe some more significant stuff depending on how involved and helpful they get. Identify the big pieces, give them first refusal at a good price, and it will be over before you know it. Good luck.

jameslea
03-27-2013, 10:47 PM
I have a fifty year collection of stuff and my wife already knows what to do when I no longer need it. She will call Gary Shenley the auctioneer who runs Cabin Fever. 1-800-789-5068. He will come and haul all of it away, get the best auction price and send you a check. In the past few years I have been in the same situation with two other collections and the heirs were very satisfied with the outcome. I have no connection with Gary other than as a friend.

Freedom2be
03-28-2013, 08:38 AM
Thanks for that info, James Lea.

Ron of Va
03-28-2013, 11:14 AM
I think it would be wise to lay out your mystery items on a work bench, one after the other. Then strip off a couple of feet of masking tape. Then number each item. Then take a photo and post it.

I can almost guarantee that all the items will be identified.

Wirecutter
03-28-2013, 01:31 PM
This is the same reason I have 6 4.5" angle grinders with 2 more "spares" in boxes on a shelf. And when working on steel fabrication projects I guarantee I've had them all in rapid rotation many times. I also have 3 common bench grinders in 6" and 7" wheel diameters (plus a carbide grinder!) with different wheels in all positions.


Second that, but I only have 3 angle grinders.

-Mark

john hobdeclipe
04-01-2013, 10:04 PM
OK, so bring us up to date on what kind of neat stuff you found this weekend.

Joel
04-02-2013, 12:04 AM
I have already brought the 8 drills (WHY anyone needs EIGHT when we only have 2 hands, I have yet to discover).

Only 8 drills? How the hell did the man get anything done!

How it is pretty easy to end up with 8 drills:
I was young and needed a drill (first drill, no Cadillac). Drill count = 1.
Had to mix thinset, so needed a powerful low-geared drill.
Got a cordless drill.
Friend gives me a drill surplus to him.
Lots of holes in concrete, so here comes a hammer drill.
Started doing more woodworking and a second cordless really sped things up.
Got a small cordless for super cheap, and a countersink stays in it all the time. Still happy about this choice.
Much time passes.
Went by a pawn shop and they had a really nice screw gun marked $3. They thought it was broken I guess. I pushed the bit in and it works perfectly.
Father passes. Brother gives me dads 2 drills.
Batteries on the old cordless got weak. Sale pricing puts new 18v drill with 2 batteries cheaper than replacement 12v batteries, so another cordless. Of course the old 12v is too nice to just throw away. Approximate dill count = 11


I am sure I have overlooked a few drills, but you get the idea. I am also quite sure MANY of us here have wandered similar and varied routes in the acquisition of our many tools. I won't mind what happens to them too terribly much after I die, since I will not be in any position to complain. I have instructions to pass as much as possible on to anyone who might actually put the tools to use. Hopefully, they will (again) encourage someone to learn how to fix something, make something, or at least get them off the couch and doing something (ANYthing) useful.

PS: I only have 4 angle grinders (IIRC). It's hard to have too many angle grinders. :D

Freedom2be
04-02-2013, 04:51 PM
OK, so bring us up to date on what kind of neat stuff you found this weekend.

John, it was a busy 3 hours. Ken did lots of BASIC explaining, for which I am grateful.

Sorted through the 4 drawers under the lathe, one drawer now holds ALL the lathe accessories, so I will know what goes with it. We found the key for the 3 chuck (?) which is on the lathe. Found a key for a 4 chuck but could not locate it. My Dad says yes he had one, so it is there someplace.

The lathe has not been used in years, and when Ken turned it on, it hummed but did not turn. He shut it off quickly, no harm done. It needs some lubricating and care. Dad says Mystery Oil will fix it up?

We found a set of files, all in good condition, Made in USA! (Ken says that is important, lol). Two have a really good brand name on them, the others not so much.

Combination wrenches, both metric and inches (Is that the other term?). Ratchet set with tons and tons of sockets, one really hit the spot for Ken, something about the size.

Lots of measuring tools, micrometers? One set in a small wooden box, the larger one is 0 to 1 inch, the smaller one is 0 to 1/2 inch and Ken was in LOVE! Several things which looked like 6 inch rulers to me, but oh NO they are something different! And we found a Kwik Chek Hole Gage in a nice case, from the company in PA. A number 30. Has a small piece of metal inside to measure a hole's diameter. Not sure what you USE it for, but it is there. Also a Starrett micrometer in a red 'velvet' case, with lots of markings on it. We set that aside for me to research more about it.

One interesting screwdriver, the metal goes right through the handle and has a piece at the end made for hitting it with a hammer - I don't recall the name, but I labelled it. We all hit screwdrivers on the end, but they usually aren't MADE for that.

Two variable transformers but we could not locate the soldering iron that goes with. Those are in a drawer with several irons, just not the one to go with the transformers. One is large, Ken said a plumber would probably like it.

We got less than 1/4 of the way through the room! So I will be contacting the other fellas who volunteered to help go through things.

I'm sure Ken will have a different view on what we did / accomplished, ha haa.

I can't thank Ken enough, I wanted to at least take him out for lunch, he didn't even have something to drink (not even water!) while we worked. For those who haven't met him, nice man, VERY Knowledgeable and willing to share that.

sasquatch
04-02-2013, 05:11 PM
Great to hear that you have help to get all this stuff sorted!! Fine Job!!

john hobdeclipe
04-04-2013, 09:39 PM
Lots of measuring tools, micrometers? One set in a small wooden box, the larger one is 0 to 1 inch, the smaller one is 0 to 1/2 inch and Ken was in LOVE! Several things which looked like 6 inch rulers to me, but oh NO they are something different! And we found a Kwik Chek Hole Gage in a nice case, from the company in PA. A number 30. Has a small piece of metal inside to measure a hole's diameter. Not sure what you USE it for, but it is there. Also a Starrett micrometer in a red 'velvet' case, with lots of markings on it. We set that aside for me to research more about it.


This is good. The first step, before you begin making things with your lathe, is to learn to use all the various measuring tools at your disposal, so you can be sure to make things the right size.

PixMan
04-04-2013, 10:49 PM
Glad to be of help, wish I could have spent more time there. Would you like me to come back this weekend?

The cute little 0-1/2" micrometer was one of offshore make that was more a novelty item than a precision measuring tool, the larger one seemed to be of better quality.

The nice micrometer is a like-new Starrett No.T230XRL-1. There's a serial or stock number engraved on the backside of the frame, probably done with one of those acid-based printer systems. That wouldn't affect the precision of the tool, though some folks might think it hurts the value. T = tenths scale, 230 = style number, X = carbide anvils, R = ratchet thimble, L = thimble lock. It has the original red plastic case (I think) but the adjustment wrench isn't there.

The Craftsman metric combination wrench set is in perfect condition, look unused. I would be interested in the 36mm socket because it's a common size for motorcycle axle nuts. (I am a motorcycle nut myself!)

The Kwik-Check hole gage seems to be of limited size range, and it a little hard to use. It did check out to be within calibration with the setting gauge. One of the 0-6" scales is a like-new Starrett No.604R, it it's original plastic case (clear one side, red the other side.) Other scales are in need of some TLC to be able to read them, some well-worn.

There's just SO MUCH stuff in there to sort out, though the majority of it isn't machinist tools. The lathe clearly needs some attention. When I tried turning it on, the motor said "no" so I clicked it off before the magic smoke got let out. I relieved pressure on the belt system (to the rear of the spindle) and it the spindle turns freely. I would need just a little more time to figure out why the motor didn't turn it. In hindsight, I should have tried the motor with the belts loose to see if it would run unloaded. Sorry about that. Like I said above, I could take a spin back up there on Saturday, this time on my bike for sure because it's going to be a glorious day!

Freedom2be
04-05-2013, 10:14 AM
Glad to be of help, wish I could have spent more time there. Would you like me to come back this weekend?

There's just SO MUCH stuff in there to sort out, though the majority of it isn't machinist tools.
Sent you a message, can't do it this weekend, details and an option in message.

Yes, there is SO MUCH stuff, and when you have no idea what the heck it IS, it is quite overwhelming.

Peter.
04-05-2013, 12:30 PM
Nice of Ken to come over and spend time helping you sort through the stuff. Even if you can't remember or identify every part you find afterwards it'll give you a good idea as to what 'family' parts belong to as you find them - electrical, woodworking, metalworking, hand-tools etc.