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mike4
03-29-2013, 03:53 AM
The following is a collection of thoughts on something that I have wasted some time on lately.

I have been make purchase one of these recently "to improve my response to closing calls"

I lost 1/2 a work day just finding someone who actually had one in stock for sale , took 4 more houres to get the overrated piece of advertisers dribble working on the phone system , now another day to download the required "apps" .

To boot I will now loose more time due to having to pull over and reply to emails , even answer the stupid thing .

I can see it hitting the bitumen at 110klms an hour very soon , I could have purchased three normal phones with incar cradles and hands free kits , been able to get to and from the jobsites quicker without wasting time on a pansies toy.

Why cant people have a choice when it comes to the communications equipment that is offered for sale by people who obviously do not work away from their cosy offices and the latte machines.

One really cheesed off person .

Has anyone else been put in this mood by the "designers " of modern junk?

Michael

Black Forest
03-29-2013, 06:54 AM
In order to use a smart phone you need to be at least as smart as the phone!

bandsawguy
03-29-2013, 07:32 AM
I have the blackberry z10 and love it. I can use voice dictation to and emails make calls or text someone all while running down the highway at 120 kph.

Peter.
03-29-2013, 07:50 AM
The following is a collection of thoughts on something that I have wasted some time on lately.

I have been make purchase one of these recently "to improve my response to closing calls"

I lost 1/2 a work day just finding someone who actually had one in stock for sale , took 4 more houres to get the overrated piece of advertisers dribble working on the phone system , now another day to download the required "apps" .

To boot I will now loose more time due to having to pull over and reply to emails , even answer the stupid thing .

I can see it hitting the bitumen at 110klms an hour very soon , I could have purchased three normal phones with incar cradles and hands free kits , been able to get to and from the jobsites quicker without wasting time on a pansies toy.

Why cant people have a choice when it comes to the communications equipment that is offered for sale by people who obviously do not work away from their cosy offices and the latte machines.

One really cheesed off person .

Has anyone else been put in this mood by the "designers " of modern junk?

Michael

Why would you buy a phone you cannot figure out the workings of?

Most smartphones are very good at connecting to bluetooth hands-free, so it should improve your call-taking capacity when driving.

They also have built-in mapping with driving directions- another great aid if you're stuck looking for somewhere or need to search quickly for something when out and about.

Emails etc they aren't the best for, but useable after a fashion and some people do very well at it - but it's not the phone's fault you find it awkward. Having the emails on your phone doesn't mean you have to answer them with the phone - the phone hasn't removed any functionality you had for sending emails but it HAS given you constant access to the headers so you get to catch all the important ones and then you can sit down and respond to them by your regular means - or call the person on your new phone.

Don't blame the phone, or the designer. Blame yourself for being too closed-minded to embrace what you've spent your money on.

Willy
03-29-2013, 08:26 AM
I have the blackberry z10 and love it. I can use voice dictation to and emails make calls or text someone all while running down the highway at 120 kph.

That's reassuring to hear.
Most drivers I see are bobbing and weaving all over the road while texting at 50 K.
Must be one of the new apps that interfaces with your automobile allows this.:rolleyes:

achtanelion
03-29-2013, 12:02 PM
What a lot of people seem to forget when they go the smartphone route is the style of communication is not governed by the device it's on.

Emails: highly asynchronous. I will respond to it after I have: noticed it, thought about what the response requires, gathered the resources needed for the response, and thought through my reply. It's for things like letters, proposals, quotes, etc.

Texts: asynchronous. Got a quick question, but don't need an answer right away? Fire me a text and I'll respond when it's safe and I won't be taking time from the person in front of me.

Phone: synchronous. If you need to get an answer right away, there's this fancy new voice communication app available on smartphones.

Remember, you can go into your ringer settings and set various alerts and loudnesses for any of he communication channels. My preferred settings are:

Phone : a ringing phone, with a bit of a unique hiccup to it. Medium loud. Gets changed to a bull elk in hunting season. (expected noises don't scare the game as much).

Text : squirrel chattering. Fairly quiet. It's amazing how perturbed some people get when you ignore it until you're done talking to them.

Email: silent, flashes a light on the phone until I notice and check my email. Usually not responded to unless I'm at my desk.

These rules and settings work for me. Something else might work for you. The important thing to remember is you're in command of the machine, not the other way around.

J

danlb
03-29-2013, 12:32 PM
As a former 'road ninja' I have to sympathize with you. Trying to use a phone as if it were a PC makes life difficult. I think that Achtanelion is 100% correct in that smart phones are more a way to stay informed than they are a way to respond.

One 'extra' that many smart phones have is that they can connect your laptop to the internet. This gives you the ability to do things like responding to a text about the meeting you are driving to. by using your laptop to make last minute changes to the presentation.

Dan

Weston Bye
03-29-2013, 12:52 PM
Wonders of wonders that civilization survived or even progressed out of the primordial ooze without these things.

My first device was a pager, begrudgingly accquired after my mother-in-law fell ill. "Punch in your number followed by 911 if this is an emergency - otherwise I will reply at my earliest possible opportunity."

Then my customers wanted the number for quicker "service". I returned multitudes of calls from pay phones (remember those?) to the Enquiring Minds with stupid questions that could have waited for the regular face-to-face visit the next day, when I would have at least had the satisfaction of giving them the "stupid look" before answering the question.

Upgrade next to the cell phone. This, after getting out of business. Now, only calls from friends and family, until my employer wants the number. This is mostly OK, as everyone at work mostly asks legitimate questions that I know the answer to and they don't. I occasionally get roped into a 3-way conference call. I once spent three quarters of an hour parked in the gravel by the side of the road during such an event, expounding on the strengths and weaknesses of a particular patent.

My current (flip) cell phone has text capabilities which I don't use, but that doesn't stop marketers from bothering me. (current charges apply):mad:

Someday I may "progress" but I am not looking forward to it.

danlb
03-29-2013, 01:53 PM
It's funny how fast cell phones have become indispensable. Mine was down for repairs for a week. It was weird that I missed it so much. Even weirder was that my wife insisted that I take her phone for a 10 minute trip to the post office to mail a letter. She was sure that I might need it on a 3 mile drive.

In answer to the OP's original question "Has anyone else been put in this mood by the "designers " of modern junk?" I can only say that I do not share the frustration. I look at it as a hand held computer, and I've owned a dozen hand helds, PDAs and other devices since the early 90s. Modern phones are lightyears ahead of the phones, PDAs and handhelds of only 10 years ago.

To put this in perspective, I've retired so there is nothing in my world that is so important that it can't wait for me to read the text at my leisure and reply only if I feel like it.


Dan

LKeithR
03-29-2013, 02:07 PM
What a lot of people seem to forget when they go the smartphone route is the style of communication is not governed by the device it's on.

Emails: highly asynchronous. I will respond to it after I have: noticed it, thought about what the response requires, gathered the resources needed for the response, and thought through my reply. It's for things like letters, proposals, quotes, etc.

Texts: asynchronous. Got a quick question, but don't need an answer right away? Fire me a text and I'll respond when it's safe and I won't be taking time from the person in front of me.

Phone: synchronous. If you need to get an answer right away, there's this fancy new voice communication app available on smartphones.

Remember, you can go into your ringer settings and set various alerts and loudnesses for any of he communication channels. My preferred settings are:

Phone : a ringing phone, with a bit of a unique hiccup to it. Medium loud. Gets changed to a bull elk in hunting season. (expected noises don't scare the game as much).

Text : squirrel chattering. Fairly quiet. It's amazing how perturbed some people get when you ignore it until you're done talking to them.

Email: silent, flashes a light on the phone until I notice and check my email. Usually not responded to unless I'm at my desk.

These rules and settings work for me. Something else might work for you. The important thing to remember is you're in command of the machine, not the other way around.

J

Wow! Here's somebody who has the new technology figured out! I tend to operate on the same principle; assuming that 99 per cent of what other people think is "urgent" really isn't. I've operated my own business for over 40 years and I've always told my customers that: "Lack of planning on your part does not automatically become an emergency for me." The world isn't going to end if you don't instantly respond to a text or email...http://www.shopfloortalk.com/forums/images/smilies/biggrin.gif

whateg01
03-29-2013, 06:12 PM
I think a bigger concern with newer phones is that with the added complexity, comes the added chance for something to break. Whether it's a software bug or a cracked screen, newer phones do seem to be more delicate than some older ones. That said, the newest additions are way more durable than some of the earlier smart phones, and the software has become more mature, as well.

To the OP, the fact that the cell phone manufacturers don't cater to your needs simply reflects that your needs are just not that common. Even most of those who didn't think they needed the new features more often than not become so accustomed to them within the first couple of months that they might miss the phone if something happened to it. This reflects a couple of things. First, the marketing departments have a pretty good idea what we, the consumers, in general, need and want. They don't always hit the mark, but by the time a new phone comes on the market, many, many man-hours have gone into making it into something that they think will sell. Second, if there wasn't money in smart phones, they wouldn't sell them. Surprise! It isn't really you that they carriers care about. It's their bottom line. And how do they do that? By selling stuff to you. Like it or not, you don't have to have a cell phone, but if you want all the benefits that go with it, you're going to need one. And the carriers, and thus, the manufacturers, have figured out that they can sell you a smart phone and charge you for more stuff. Stuff like data and connectivity. Things like, not so long ago, the ability to tether you laptop. So, if the money was in stripped down basic handsets, you can bet that's what the carriers would be selling you. But it isn't.

I bet there was a time when people thought that an automatic transmission was just as unnecessary!

Dave

Evan
03-30-2013, 01:52 AM
I had a phone since they fit in a 10 lb bag with batteries and before that when they were simplex radiotelephone built into the dash. They then progressed to full duplex radiophone and eventually a Motorola bag phone and down the line smaller and smaller. The company expected me to answer when they called, especially when we progressed to cell phones. I could not get it through to them that BC is continuous mountains and the cell service was until just the last few years restricted to the areas within a few kilometers of each town. I was out of range more often than not as half my work day was driving from A to B with long gaps in service. When they got pissed at me for not answering I just suggested the company pay for some repeaters at $150,000 each.

The most difficult part of my job was convincing people sitting in an office looking out over nothing but many kilometers of city that not everyone works in that environment. Most had no grasp of that concept. I would occasionally snap some pictures with the camera I always carry and send them a few shots of miles and miles of forest, river and the highway with no visible structures or traffic for miles down the road. My work territory was an area of central BC of about 90,000 sq kilometres with a population density of about 0.8 people per sq kilometre.

We still don't have cell service at our home. Nothing coming in the foreseeable future either.

Boostinjdm
03-30-2013, 02:53 AM
I haven't had a cell phone in 10 years. I work for myself and tell my customers to just call the home phone. If I don't answer, it means I'm already busy. If it's urgent then leave a message. I do check my caller ID and messages frequently between jobs or when taking a break.

j king
03-30-2013, 03:17 AM
Just got an iPhone 5 and it made my life a lot easier.Has Siri speech recognition and all I do is say "call ------" and she does it.text also .can dictate an email ect... Just amazed at how well it works.i don't type for crap so this is a big plus.

If you travel at all the Siri on iPhone will spoil you.hungry? Ask her to find food.thristy?.ask. lost? She will get you there.just amazing.. Jim

John Stevenson
03-30-2013, 05:07 AM
The bit I like about the iPhone is that it has a silent ringer button on the side - no having to go into menu's.

Result is when I am ready I can see all missed calls and text. Answer phone facility switched off at the provider because what happens is someone rings you, doesn't get an answer and leaves a message. Then the ring you a bit later tell you what they want and tell you they have left a message.
Problem is you then have to pay to get a message that you know what it is ??

Works phone is a cordless that moves around the shop, it stays in the shop at night. Only have the mobile in the house.

Works number isn't even in the phone book, like all the best whores I'm ex-directory :D New customers are all word of mouth.

I find them amusing.

One guy comes round is a body builder and part time doorman, real nice guy but built like a brick sh́thouse.
His ring tone announces in a load voice,

"Warning, I am stood next to a wanker, Warning, I am stood next to a wanker"

I meant what are you going to do about this ?

Instead of having Gerts number stores as Gert, Home or similar I have it stored as Area 51.

When she rings I show it people and say "Gotta take this, it's the mother ship "

Allan Waterfall
03-30-2013, 06:18 AM
Can't understand why people have a mobile phone so they can be contacted then have it switched to answer phone mode.
I've reluctantly bought a mobile phone,cheapest one I could find.I can only make phone calls with it and I think it can do text as well.

Allan

dalee100
03-30-2013, 10:24 AM
Hi,

Like all tools, smart phones have their uses and abuses. Nor is it the right answer for everything.

Yesterday I used mine to get driving directions to get to a patient in a rural area. Took less than 20 seconds to get it. On arrival I used another app to ID a prescription drug that I was unfamiliar with that the patient had taken too many of. It also provided dosages and side affects, (not that there was much I could do on scene). It then functioned as a simple phone to call a hospital ER to let them know we were coming. I also have used a translation app to communicate through language barriers with patients.

In the shop, I have instant access to everything from tap drill charts to being able to order tooling instantly. Sadly, delivery stills takes days to get here.

Things I dislike, the whole instant availability. People seem to expect you to be instantly available. I absolutely hate texting. My Wife and Daughters seem to be OK wasting 1/2 an hour texting about a problem that can be dispensed with in less than 30 seconds during a phone call.

Over all though, once you get the hang of a smart phone and how you can use it, nothing beats the portability and convenience.

lazlo
03-30-2013, 10:39 AM
Has anyone else been put in this mood by the "designers " of modern junk?

You have a paragraph whining about the difficulty of ordering a smartphone, and you conclude that the designers are making junk? :rolleyes:

mike4
03-31-2013, 04:19 AM
I am just tired of not being able to purchase something off the shelf that works out of the box.

I dont have time to waste installing apps to get a "tool " to do what it should do , after all its just a communications device which I have been made buy by customers who think that as Evan said its only a short distance to the next job and why does it take so long to get to the next "suburb" .

I prefer to call someone and speak to them or if they are not contactable either email or send a text.

To fill in forms on a small screen while parked on the side of a highway is total BS , the people who want o promise their customers tighter and tighter SLA's need to spend some time in the field and get a dose of reality .

And to those who hinted that I didnt know how to use it , I only have one answer , "you got it wrong bigtime!".

I am time poor not technically illiterate.

I prefer to use technology as a tool to get the job done not something to spend a couple of days configuring to be able to use it.

Michael

Peter.
03-31-2013, 04:53 AM
Well then, set it to 2G mode and use it as a phone. You'll get your wish and the battery life will be vastly extended too.

danlb
04-04-2013, 02:26 AM
I think today I hit the ultimate in laziness.

I was at starbucks, waiting for my drink when I noticed a building across the road that I'd not noticed before. I could not quite see the sign on the building from my viewpoint. I wondered about it for a few minutes, but could not quite figure it out.

So I grabbed my phone, brought up Google maps and went to street view of the location I was at. I could clearly read the name of the business from the vantage point of Google's camera.

I did all this before my coffee was ready. :)

Sometimes a smart phone is just what you need.

Dan

MichaelP
04-04-2013, 09:10 AM
Dan,

You could also use your phone camera to make a picture of the building and enlarge it.

Of course, it wouldn't be such a fun without using the Internet. But wait! You could've e-mailed the picture to the person you shared the table with.

danlb
04-04-2013, 02:07 PM
Dan,

You could also use your phone camera to make a picture of the building and enlarge it.


Funny you should say that. I've done that before. Almost got kicked out of the post office for taking a picture of their poster so I could see it better. Just last night after dinner I got a dime back in change that looked fairly old but I could not make out the date, even with my glasses on. I took a picture with the cell phone and enlarged it. It was minted in 1980.

To add a touch of machining content: I used the camera on my cell phone to take pictures inside the knee of my mill. I needed to make sure I was not going to damage anything by drilling a hole through at one point. Only a slim camera or a bore-scope would provide the view I needed. The camera worked better than either of my bore scopes in this application.

Dan