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ShawnR
04-05-2013, 09:30 AM
I guess it is official. I have a tool addiction......

I found this old Clausing. It looks like a 10 or 12" (have not even checked that yet). It was tucked away, covered in shop dirt and "stuff". Came with the small 3 jaw (pictured) and a large 4 jaw (10"?) and another new in box 4 jaw which will require an adapter plate.

It will be a project but offers a longer bed and bigger swing than my small Craftex B2227. Also, I will be able to work in inches instead of converting to metric. I finally get to see what a "back gear" is since I have read a bit about them but mine does not have one. The lever at the back seems to slide the whole shaft side to side but it looks like it is supposed to engage/disengage the back gear. It looks like some set screws are missing.

I simply got it home yesterday and cleaned up the boxes of extras that came with it (not much to brag about there) so have not spent much time with it yet.

Couple of questions....Maybe premature as once I spend some time with it, it will be obvious but hopefully, if someone has some pointers for me, please feel free to chime in.

The lever on the front does not seem to do anything. It simply sits on a bolt as a pivot. Does it get connected somewhere? There is a hole in the end of it. Looks like it has been bent.
The lever in the back does disengage a set of gears in the box but why?
There is the Reversing lever on the left but it also has the power switch on the front which reverses the spindle direction.
What is the original colour? This machine looks like it has been painted but there is some red underneath. If someone did paint it, they did a pretty thorough job or maybe the red is just primer?
I tried to find some kind of manual online but no luck yet. I found a bit of a story on the Clausing company when started.

Ways a lot for it's size. The guy I bought it from wanted to sling it from the center of the bed but I would not let him. Maybe I am being anal as after all these years, it has probably been slung that way before.

It should clean up nice. ...:)

http://s1359.photobucket.com/user/ShawnR6/library/Clausing%20105

Ian B
04-05-2013, 10:32 AM
Does this tell you anything extra? http://www.lathes.co.uk/clausing/page6.html

Ian

Bill Pace
04-05-2013, 10:39 AM
Shawn,
First thing come to mind - did you get the change gears in that box?? Hopefully you did, there should be 10 or so gears from large to small that allow changing thread cutting and feed rates - rather an important part of the lathe.

I had a 100 series Mark 3 lathe, which appears to be like yours except mine had a quick change gear box (no need for change gears) A pretty nice lathe. The back lever is for back gear, allows for very slow spindle speeds. The front handle I dont know, mine didnt have that. The side lever is to reverse the lead screws rotation (the saddle will travel to the right) I never saw one with the clutch lever and not have the quick change box...

The top handle is a clutch/brake, allows the lathe motor to continue to run but stop the spindle. Mine was in terrible condition, requiring some pretty major rework. And you got a belt guard! thats very rare, some one may have shop made it...

There is a yahoo group for the Clausings: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/clausing_lathe_and_mill/

ShawnR
04-05-2013, 10:56 AM
Ian, yes I did see that page but have not read the whole thing yet. I have been scrambling lately and jumped on this lathe. I will be delving into it more. Thank you. And for your tag line, yep, applies to me. Like the tools but need to learn how to use them....;-)

Bill, Thanks for the info. Not sure what "Mark #" I have, will try to clean the crud off of it and find it. I can read the s/n and model OK though. Perhaps Ian's reference will tell me how to find it. I had not seen the yahoo group. I will join and peruse it too. Yes, the belt guard looks like an addition. Well done but I was considering taking it off. Interferes with opening the side case a bit and with only me in the shop. But then, I am sure the safety of it supersedes the "inconvenience" of it though so I will try to get used to it. It rubs on the threading chart so needs a bumper or something

So is the "back gear" only for switching from a higher speed to a lower speed? or does it switch a range ie although I do not know how to cut threads, I have the impression very slow, like 80 rpm? and then gears set feed rate for thread pitch? but then feed rate would still be relative to spindle speed so a 28 tpi still could not turn material....again, maybe sometime with it will answer my questions.

And yes, I got all of the gears too. :-)

I can hardly read the threading chart. How can I restore that? It looks like a coat of paint and then a light buffing with a fine emery cloth might accentuate the lettering...? I am concerned that if the brass is worn and not pronounced enough, then I may not be able to recover the lettering if I paint it all. They liked a small font when the did that placard!

What colour was yours?

flylo
04-05-2013, 11:24 AM
I have a 100 Mrk III that's kind of off white. It has a quick change also. Where are you located as some of the teeth on the back gear are stripped so I'm not sure what I'll do with it. It's fairly well tooled & hasa nice length bed on legs. I'm not trying to sell it on here but I may have your needed parts if they interchange.

spongerich
04-05-2013, 12:04 PM
Looks like a nice machine. I do think I see a large purchase of de-greaser in your future.

I've cleaned a lot of machinery over the past few years. Unless you're planning to repaint it, I've found it's best to start with something mild and work your way up to the more aggressive stuff as needed.

Lately, I've been using (in order)

Common household ammonia.
Generic Home Depot orange degreaser
Home Depot Purple Degreaser - This stuff is nasty and will remove paint as well as a fair bit of skin. Start with it fairly diluted and work your way up to full strength as needed. Wear gloves, wear eye protection, wear a condom...

I've also found that a hair dryer is a very handy tool... warming up the area will soften the crud and make it a lot easier to remove. Just make sure that you're done before your wife gets home.

Mike Burdick
04-05-2013, 01:03 PM
ShawnR,

I have a user/parts manual for the Clausing Model 100 series lathes. If you don't have a manual, I can email you a pdf copy - just PM me with an email address where I can send it to you.

Bill Pace
04-05-2013, 06:56 PM
This is the way mine looked when I got it - and it was in worse shape than it looked! That is a dark gray (machine gray?) and it was the only paint on it, so was almost certainly original. I did a major rework on it and completely stripped and repainted it a similar color. I was a bit disappointed, it was a too dark for my taste.

From what I pieced together on mine seemed it was a Clausing 100 Mark 3A meaning it had all the bells & whistles that was offered at that time, including the cabinet, it was built in either 1945 or 46. And from what I could find out, a belt guard wasnt offered!! no OSHA back in those days...


http://i22.photobucket.com/albums/b301/pace1980/Clausing%20lathe/SheldonClausing001.jpg


http://i22.photobucket.com/albums/b301/pace1980/CLpicsofClausing006_zpsf0a891d2.jpg?t=1365172269

flylo
04-05-2013, 07:39 PM
Mike, thanks for the e-mail!
Bill, can I borrow the magic sheet you pver it one night in the 1st pic & took it off next day for pic 2?
Mine has a small chuck & long belt also. I think the 4 jaw is a size bigger or not?

John Stevenson
04-05-2013, 07:54 PM
I can hardly read the threading chart. How can I restore that? It looks like a coat of paint and then a light buffing with a fine emery cloth might accentuate the lettering...? I am concerned that if the brass is worn and not pronounced enough, then I may not be able to recover the lettering if I paint it all. They liked a small font when the did that placard!




Take a close up photo and measure the plate, might be able to make a new plate.

Mike Burdick
04-05-2013, 08:38 PM
For the lathe pictured by Bill Pace: If wanted, the graphics for the threading plate can be downloaded at the following link...

http://bbssystem.com/viewtopic.php?t=1297

http://bbssystem.com/files/clausing_thread_and_feed_pl_828.jpg

ShawnR
04-05-2013, 09:10 PM
Hey Bill

Those photos are inspiring! I kind of figured grey but cannot see any on it. I may just go with it.....have not even got it functioning fully and already thinking about the colour. I think my wife's ideas of renos is affecting me. ;-)

The older chuck looks the same as your original, one socket only on a three jaw chuck. My other original looking chuck is 10" and the one in the box (China aftermarket), looks around 6-8". Where did you get the adapter plate for the new chuck?

I could not resist and looked a little more closely at the lathe today, between other "to do's". The saddle is kind of stuck. I say kind of as it has been moved from the chuck end when I first looked at it to closer to the tailstock now, during moving to make room for slinging, etc. . I am afraid it got bumped/stessed during loading/unloading but it may be just that the ways are very tight there and the saddle was adjusted more for worn ways nearer the chuck. The feed handle (longitudinal) does move the gear on the ....term..? but the saddle is VERY hard to move. I think I will need to disassemble it in place to find out what is going on.

I need to clean even to get to the fasteners though. The ways are very "dinged up". I hope the lathe is not too far out to use.

As to the spare large chuck I got, would you mount that one on this lathe? It looks huge! 10" diameter on what I think is a 12" lathe. I wonder if someone slipped it in there from somewhere else? I will most likely make or buy the adapter plate and mount the new 4 jaw. It looks more reasonable. I will take some photos and post them.

flylo, thanks for the offer. I will see if I need anything as I get into it. When I said I had no backgear, I meant on my Craftex. The Clausing looks complete, so far. Just lacking major TLC.

Bill Pace
04-05-2013, 10:01 PM
That "original" 3 jaw chuck was garbage and promptly went in the trash and the 4 jaw was little better, but I did have a mate to it and between the 2 I did make it somewhat useable and offered it to the buyer advising him it was poor. The 3 jaw that ended up on it was a 5" from Shars - I already had a back plate. Shars and CDCO has back plates very cheap, CDCO is something like $40.

A 10" chuck is gonna be crowding that lathe - probably the ideal would be a 6" 3 jaw and an 8" 4 jaw.

My carriage was also stuck in the position shown with the ways so rusted up, in fact, it was so stuck that someone had apparently cranked down on the wheel so much that the key on the shaft was stripped and a tooth missing on the gear. As youre thinking, I had to take it apart where it sat and work it off the end of the bed.

I really hope yours is in better condition than mine, I had to cut 3 gears, rebuild the spindle, the back gear train, completely rework/build the clutch, the apron need a lot of work, cross & compound had a mile of slack, etc, etc. But, this kinda stuff is what gets my juices flowing and when all the work comes together like it did and looks like that, Im happy - and I had 3 guys fighting over who was gonna buy it.

Dr Stan
04-05-2013, 11:32 PM
I had 3 guys fighting over who was gonna buy it.

As you should have. That was a prime example of high quality craftsmanship.

ShawnR
04-06-2013, 09:26 AM
Mike, I received the manual pdf. THANK YOU! That should make this adventure a whole lot easier....

Now it is just getting dirty. I am good at that....

:-)

Dr Stan
04-06-2013, 09:45 AM
When I rebuilt my Fray mill I used my pressure washer on the castings once I had stripped off the machined parts. I also used reverse electrolysis to clean up some of the unpainted parts. You can see the table being cleaned this way on the lower RH side of this link http://s1016.photobucket.com/user/drstan/library/Fray%20Milling%20Machine

I used the largest plastic tote I could find for the tank, my battery charger as the power source, and a grid made from rebar as the anode. Since the solution is mainly iron in solution and some left over washing soda it can be disposed of in the sanitary sewer system. Sure helped get all the crud out of the T slots without major elbow grease. There have been several discussion on reverse electrolysis in the forum and a Google search will turn up lots of resources on the topic.

BTW, as a former sailor I'm not really a big fan of gray paint (just saw way too much), however I also discovered the machine tool builders made a wise color choice. I painted my 9" SB International Harvester white (a cream or off white) and that was a mistake. The slightest bit of dirt stood out like a sore thumb. For my Fray I used Rust-Oleum gray industrial machinery paint and am quite happy with its appearance. Its a glossy gray rather than a haze gray so the color is OK with me.

ShawnR
11-16-2015, 08:39 AM
Well, I see from my opening post that I have had this old lathe sitting in the corner for 1 1/2 years. I finally got around to cleaning it up a bit. When I bought it, the saddle would not go to the tail stock end. I thought it was just really dirty...it was dirty and covered in grime and chips, ...but upon a better look on the weekend, It appears the ways seem really worn. The saddle has visible play (probably better called "slop" in this case) at the chuck but can not go than about 2/3 of the bed length before binding. I have yet to do a better inspection but from the look of the dings in the rails at the chuck end, the lathe has had a hard life. Bad on me for rushing into something.

Now I need to determine how far to go with it....

I contacted one local machine shop and the fella seemed knowledgeable. He said they would not grind it but rather mill it to make it straight again. Anyone ever hear of this? All I can find is lots of info on grinding and scraping. The machine, as I feel right now, is waaaaay beyond scraping.

EddyCurr
11-16-2015, 10:02 AM
To paraphrase an old saying:


"Buy in haste,
restore at leisure ..."

Now that you are back in "GO" mode, throttle back a bit from
full speed ahead. Take some time to evaluate what really needs
to be done. Start with a thorough clean-up: I recommend NOT
disassembling yet - get a sense of what you are actually dealing
with, determine whether the work/expense/time is in or out of
scope for where you are in life. If you do this before disassembly
and find that the answer is that the project is more than you want
to have on your plate, it will be easier to sell a cleanish, assembled
lathe than it will be to sell a disassembled one.

.

Danl
11-16-2015, 11:05 AM
Mike, I think that feed and threading chart is for models that have the quick change gear train? (Sliding Gear in/out)

I have no idea what the unknown lever in front is for, mine does not have it and it looks to be home made. I've got about $500 in mine, including the stand, which weighs close to 300#.

I've never heard of milling the ways of a lathe to correct wear, but I'm not nearly as experienced as many on this board. I need to get serious about making a gear train cover, since they are so hard to find. http://home.wavecable.com/~danlinscheid/My%20Clausing%20111.jpg

ShawnR
11-16-2015, 01:38 PM
I took some measurements today. Maybe someone can tell me if I am on the right track in my assessing strategy....?

What I mean is, am I taking measurements at the right places? Stations are 2" apart. What would I expect in a fair condition machine? I am thinking it is not as bad as I had expected. From the feel of the saddle, I would have guessed 10-30 times what I found.

The variation from worse to best is about .005 (disregard that very first front one. I must have misread that one and it is virtually under the chuck anyways. In other threads, I have heard of tolerances of .0005 so if that is what I want, then I am 10 times "ideal". What would be considered real or practical for home? I know, just use it and see what happens, but now I am curious. :-)

And is .005 an amount that could be scraped or should it be milled, as the local shop suggests? orrr....any other suggestions now that you have move info?

On a good note, I feel that the more I clean, the better it is looking. Maybe not as bad as I thought, although I have not gotten into the other parts of it.

http://images.tapatalk-cdn.com/15/11/16/b9866b0427849beb08894bf26101b370.jpg

http://images.tapatalk-cdn.com/15/11/16/6ffc7880664acddc93a545ed941e5228.jpg

http://images.tapatalk-cdn.com/15/11/16/a552e3ff2eeb4bc7ba8f124d6b97ec28.jpg

ShawnR
11-16-2015, 01:41 PM
This photo just shows where I took the back measurements

http://images.tapatalk-cdn.com/15/11/16/87a52ac788db7ee70e9fe8cce264a072.jpg

Sent from my SGH-I337M using Tapatalk

ShawnR
11-16-2015, 02:05 PM
Dan. That looks nice. I have some work ahead of me....

As I checked my chart, it appears I measured wrong. I measured from the peak of the guide but the numbers went up in the area I expected the greatest wear to be. So the wear must be in the sides of the guide? I don't know how I would measure that.. Maybe I should have just asked where to check? Is there a check that I can do to quantify the wear?

Baz
11-16-2015, 03:09 PM
The measurements are ... kind of meaningless I'm afraid.
One easy thing is to assume the bit where you have written 17,18,19 etc is not worn so is a flat surface. If the tailstock rides on it that will wear at the far end. Mount a dial indicator on the carriage with its foot/lever bearing on the just mentioned surface. As the carriage goes along the v-ways towards the headstock if the carriage and v-way are worn the carriage will dip down as will be immediately shown. Don't panic. Look at the geometry (draw it on paper) and you will see it can dip down several thou without much affecting the actual depth of cut on a large diameter. Effect is greater if you are making needles of course.
The machine shop was probably suggesting milling because they don't have a big enough grinder as a lathe bed is bigger than normal everyday jobs.
Really intrigued by the front lever. All the pictures show the boss on the casting where the bolt is. I suspect an intended different top cover design and the pattern just wasn't corrected.

Danl
11-16-2015, 04:13 PM
http://home.wavecable.com/~danlinscheid/apron%20clutch.jpgOn the model 100 series Clausing lathes, this is called a "clutch". Your apron looks very similar to mine, Shawn.


While a clutch may be defined as something that can grasp tightly some other thing, I tend to think of the way a clutch in a car works....transferring power from the engine to the transmission without jerking the car all over the road. However, in the photo, one can readily see that only by unscrewing the star clutch wheel (p/n Q336) and pushing it away from the operator, would the feed be disengaged. If done while feeding, results may not be optimal.


I bought this lathe several months ago, and could never get this clutch to operate as a clutch. After taking it apart, it is apparent that it was never meant to engage or disengage in a smooth manner. Owners of the 4800 series have a far better engagement mechanism.


See Tony's site on this, where it says, "The improved apron (which was only available on lathes fitted with a screwcutting gearbox) was fitted with a simple but robust cone clutch, operated by turning a star-shaped knob on the front. The clutch protected the apron from damaging overloads but meant that (like many similar designs) there was no means of instantly disengaging the power feeds other than by unscrewing the knob - or unwisely trying to pull the selector lever into its neutral position whilst under load."


Other than this weird little fact, I really like this lathe and find the overall manufacturing quality to be superior to my 12x36 Enco Chinese lathe. The 3/4" spindle through hole is a little irksome, but as a second lathe I can go to while not disturbing the larger lathe, it is a great little machine.

My brother and I had to cut a new gear, the 72 tooth wide gear at the bottom of the gear train, since mine was missing. A nice guy (and a member here) from CA donated a quadrant and the remainder of my missing gears.


Dan L

ShawnR
11-16-2015, 06:57 PM
Baz..Thanks for the suggestion re dial indicator. Here is the findings from that quick check. I was running out the door to work but had to try it first. Give me something to think about.

So, when a shop mills or grinds a lathe beef like this, they grind the v surfaces...? I can picture it I guess. Cutting head at an angle to lathe bed?

I will google images.
I cannot figure out how to loosen the gib? screw on the right side of the saddle. It goes in from below and the feed gear is in the way. I am trying not to go too far as previously suggested but am getting sucked in....:-)

http://images.tapatalk-cdn.com/15/11/16/b789c9b7035dfd32bf14eec7b6dbd4f8.jpg

Sent from my SGH-I337M using Tapatalk

Richard P Wilson
11-16-2015, 07:12 PM
I took some measurements today. Maybe someone can tell me if I am on the right track in my assessing strategy....?

What I mean is, am I taking measurements at the right places? Stations are 2" apart. What would I expect in a fair condition machine? I am thinking it is not as bad as I had expected. From the feel of the saddle, I would have guessed 10-30 times what I found.

The variation from worse to best is about .005 (disregard that very first front one. I must have misread that one and it is virtually under the chuck anyways. In other threads, I have heard of tolerances of .0005 so if that is what I want, then I am 10 times "ideal". What would be considered real or practical for home? I know, just use it and see what happens, but now I am curious. :-)

And is .005 an amount that could be scraped or should it be milled, as the local shop suggests? orrr....any other suggestions now that you have move info?

On a good note, I feel that the more I clean, the better it is looking. Maybe not as bad as I thought, although I have not gotten into the other parts of it.

http://images.tapatalk-cdn.com/15/11/16/b9866b0427849beb08894bf26101b370.jpg

http://images.tapatalk-cdn.com/15/11/16/6ffc7880664acddc93a545ed941e5228.jpg

http://images.tapatalk-cdn.com/15/11/16/a552e3ff2eeb4bc7ba8f124d6b97ec28.jpg

Sorry, but those readings you took on the peak of the Vees are meaningless. Nothing rides on that little flat on the peak, the carriage and the tailstock ride on sloping faces of the vees. Often that little flat was machined during the first rough machining of the bed, then the bed casting was left to 'season' (warp) for a few months before final machining, and that little flat wasn't touched the second time around. Its for this reason that when you are finally setting up the lathe and are levelling the bed and checking for twist, don't put the level on the little flats, use spacers on the wide flat ways.

ShawnR
11-16-2015, 10:57 PM
Ok, I think i am getting it now. Tough to measure with the tools I have. Maybe an inverted v block cut for this purpose..? Ahhh, another project. At the end of the day, it does not really matter. ... I have slop at one end, and cannot get the saddle to the other end so the rails need work. Perhaps I could use feeler gauges under the saddle at various points along its travel to at least give me an idea of the extremes.

Thanks for the suggestions and input.

I will report back when I make some real progress


UOTE=Richard P Wilson;1014483]Sorry, but those readings you took on the peak of the Vees are meaningless. Nothing rides on that little flat on the peak, the carriage and the tailstock ride on sloping faces of the vees. Often that little flat was machined during the first rough machining of the bed, then the bed casting was left to 'season' (warp) for a few months before final machining, and that little flat wasn't touched the second time around. Its for this reason that when you are finally setting up the lathe and are levelling the bed and checking for twist, don't put the level on the little flats, use spacers on the wide flat ways.[/QUOTE]

Richard P Wilson
11-17-2015, 03:23 AM
I don't know your particular lathe, but on most Vee/flat bed lathes, theres a keeper plate under the saddle, usually at the back, which stops the saddle lifting during some cutting operations. You might find that its this plate causing the binding at the tailstock end. Loosen its fastenings, see if that makes any difference.
I can see that you have cleaned off the top of the bed, so this might be a silly question, but did you clean off all the gunk from under the back way, where the keeper plate runs? I think you said there are a lot of 'dings' on the bed, and each 'ding' will have a little raised area around it. Use a little oilstone to flatten these out, see if that helps.
At the end of the day though, what is important is how the lathe turns, does it turn parallel, and you won't know this until you start using it.

Wayne Sippola
11-17-2015, 06:52 AM
Before you start working on the ways, find out why the carriage is binding. Get that working, and then make some test cuts. The measurements really won't help (particularly those ones, as previously mentioned) - what you want to know is how straight it cuts. And frankly, it doesn't even need to cut all that straight to be a very useful machine! I have 4 lathes, and I rarely take longer cuts on anything (which is when cutting without taper is important) - it all depends on the type of work you do.

I would highly recommend you just go ahead and use the lathe once the carriage binding issue is resolved. Once you get used to what it can and can't do, you can make a much more informed decision on whether to start rebuilding - which is likely to be a time consuming and expensive process.

If you're anywhere near Trenton, let me know - I'd be happy to come look it over for you and give you my 2 cents worth.

Wayne

ShawnR
11-17-2015, 11:02 AM
Thanks Richard. I did clean those areas. The saddle moves better but will not come off the tail stock end. There is a cap screw from the top on the left side that came out and a bolt on the right side. There is a cap screw from the bottom on the right side that does not show up in parts diagrams. With this in place, I cannot loosen the plate ( gib?) under the saddle to allow enough play to remove the saddle. I need to figure out how to get that cap screw out. It is behind the feed gear. I firnd the manual on line. It seems to run ok with some slop, nothing surprising for it's age. Looks promising.

Sent from my SGH-I337M using Tapatalk

Richard P Wilson
11-17-2015, 12:29 PM
Its under the feed gear? I was expecting the keep plate to be under the back of the saddle, at the rear of the machine. When you say its got slop, do you mean side to side, front to back, or up and down? Under working conditions, the cutting forces from the tool work their way downwards, and press the front of the saddle firmly downwards onto that front vee. If you press firmly downwards with one hand on the toolpost, can you still feel slop in the carriage?

Danl
11-18-2015, 04:50 PM
On my model 111, there are two plates, but the one on the front of the lathe also has the carriage lock, a square headed bolt......

Richard P Wilson
11-18-2015, 06:22 PM
On my model 111, there are two plates, but the one on the front of the lathe also has the carriage lock, a square headed bolt......

Makes sense.

ShawnR
11-18-2015, 06:49 PM
I made some progress today. I separated the saddle from the skirt (terminology?) And then was able to slide the saddle away. I was then able to access the bottom cap screw. It looks like someone added it after the fact. It was this cap screw that was not allowing me to move the saddle to the end as it had been tightened, probably,
to compensate for the wear. ..? This makes more sense now. I am now able to take the saddle off and better assess. Another thing I did today was to "lift" the saddle when it was next to the chuck and measured .011". I also placed the dial indicator on the saddle and ran the length of the bed, running the indicator tip on the flat surface behind the front v rail. This also yielded .011" . As previously commented, this surface may not have been trued when the lathe bed was made, but it did reflect what I found in play at the chuck end so I am optimistic I can somehow use this as a reference to fix the rails. Here are some photos.

I did look at the chuck too. It is crappy, I think. Self centering 3 jaw but only one tightening screw. I tried to manually turn a rod in it and got one good result but others reflected .030ish" I suspect my set up or the chuck jaws were the problems versus the spindle. The chuck came off easily. Attached with a 1.5" x 8 threaded spindle. I have a new 6" chuck on a box that came with the lathe but it requires an adapter plate made. I did one once. I think I will keep assessing this lathe before I take the time to make the adapter.

I also found a machinist in the city who has the same lathe and is willing to assist me so my situation is looking a little brighter. I find the lathe can feed the tool in both directions and has a power cross feed. I do not have those features on my other lathe. Makes it more appealing to put the effort into fixing the Clausing up.

Some days are better than others. ☺

http://images.tapatalk-cdn.com/15/11/18/d5e73fc9e6543432d6e247968a3b1d3b.jpg

http://images.tapatalk-cdn.com/15/11/18/8c2545f3b3f4474f4e8263226364a3aa.jpg

http://images.tapatalk-cdn.com/15/11/18/f660e97d0f23c8c011812bab768ff669.jpg

Sent from my SGH-I337M using Tapatalk

ShawnR
11-18-2015, 07:21 PM
On my model 111, there are two plates, but the one on the front of the lathe also has the carriage lock, a square headed bolt......


Sounds like mine is like Dan's

Richard P Wilson
11-19-2015, 02:29 AM
Another thing I did today was to "lift" the saddle when it was next to the chuck and measured .011". I also placed the dial indicator on the saddle and ran the length of the bed, running the indicator tip on the flat surface behind the front v rail. This also yielded .011" . As previously commented, this surface may not have been trued when the lathe bed was made, but it did reflect what I found in play at the chuck end so I am optimistic I can somehow use this as a reference to fix the rails. Here are some photos.



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You don't have to worry about how much you can lift the saddle, when its in use the cutting forces are nearly always pressing it firmly downwards on to the bed. Now you've measured deflection relative to the flat behind the vee? Thats OK, that was machined at the same time as the Vee, its the little flat on top of the Vee that probably won't have been.

ShawnR
11-20-2015, 08:40 AM
This might be a stupid question..I prefer to hope it is perceived as amateur (that would be fitting )

I have found several threads on remediation of the worn v ways. I kinda wondered if it was possible to set up a small grinding wheel with a home made jig and levelling the ways a bit. I am not trying to make this lathe new and any lathe's capabilities out weighs my personal talent (maybe except this one right now) so if I can get it close, I should be good. Since I have the flat that is not worn (most recent reference), I could run a jig or something along it supporting a small die grinder fitted with a small grinding wheel set to the appropriate v rail angle...?

Some links for example are but there are many.... my questions what repercussions will result? ie misalignments? See my shim question below...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7NGEQFJdmo4

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GlbKtYJJw-s

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/threads/44797-I-have-a-cunning-plan*-for-a-lathe-bed-regrind


I understand that the v under the slide is worn too so could this be lined with a piece of stainless shim stock .010, bonded somehow to the bottom of the slide? Or for .010, would it need to be? I noted .010 (actually .011) and reason that it would be .005(5) off of each of the rail and the bottom of the slide... fair assumption... ?

Right now, I am trying to make a plan or get the whole picture to make this lathe good again before I commit too much to this project. Some of the gears are worn too (visible wobble) but I would suspect I could do something with them. I found a post from a fella who ordered gears from Clausing in 2010 so am optimistic that some stock still exists for new parts.

Thanks to all for your support.

ShawnR
12-01-2015, 09:14 AM
After looking at the lathe better and trying to picture the whole process to grind the ways myself, and considering my lack of experience, I have decided not try it on my own. Probably the best decision I have made. Now, I must find someone to do it. I have a line locally that might work out. I put the lathe back together last night to try it. It will be quite nice if a rebuild is successful. It feels much more solid than my other little Craftex from BusyBee.

portlandRon
12-01-2015, 12:14 PM
Shawn, as others have said I would just get the lathe cleaned up and running.

Do some turning and see how it does.

I think you will find that you will do 90% of you your turning with the carriage within 10 inches of the headstock. With that in mind it does not make a lot of difference if the carriage is tight at the right end of the bed. Adjust the saddle for the left end of the bed and make some chips.

By the way I have the same lathe.

loose nut
12-01-2015, 02:46 PM
I guess it is official. I have a tool addiction......


That's to bad.

There is no known cure for tool addiction and it serious enough to result premature death (as in the wife beat you to death with her frying pan for spending the grocery money on more tools). You can try one of the 12 step programs but it will most likely fail so just go with it. Deceiving yourself that because you use these tools there for they must in fact serve a good purpose is just a lie. The first thing to do is admit that just because you use them doesn't mean your not an addict.

Unfortunately you are now doomed like the rest of us, so go buy an airplane hanger to put them in.

ShawnR
12-02-2015, 12:12 PM
I think it is too bad to use. I have been trying to do some practice cuts but the chucks are not great either. Need a handy machinist neighbor.... :-) but don't have one

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ShawnR
02-27-2016, 08:32 AM
I have not posted for a while but have been working on this project....working being disassembling, cleaning and painting. I have not fixed anything yet. I have done some research on the bed rails and still not sure what that outcome will be. I might just end up with a pretty, but not useful lathe.....:-)

I figured I would clean it up, assess and repair as I reassemble. Most of the repairs thus far look doable by me (limited experience).

I will put up some pictures from my phone. I stripped all of the old paint off with stripper and tools. From the first layer, it looks like it was originally red so I went with that.

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ShawnR
02-27-2016, 08:33 AM
http://images.tapatalk-cdn.com/16/02/27/f9b0045c2fdfed2ca8e32fca20ffab43.jpghttp://images.tapatalk-cdn.com/16/02/27/ecb25e633a365754600e29172c30437e.jpg

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ShawnR
02-27-2016, 08:39 AM
One question I have is how to repair a pulley. The area around the set screw on the keyway is broken out. Looks like cast aluminum. I have an article in an old HSM magazine that does exactly this repair by replacing the hub. I have that to fall back on. I have wondering if tigging up the broken material and retapping would be ok. I also wonder if turning a collar with a set screw in it would work. Input?

http://images.tapatalk-cdn.com/16/02/27/4d163a6b80403afcbcacb77d0460de88.jpg

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Rosco-P
02-27-2016, 08:42 AM
Shrink fit a new collar over the old one. Cut a new keyway opposite the original, drill and tap for a new setscrew.

ShawnR
02-27-2016, 08:46 AM
Never thought of a new keyway. I have seen it done using a lathe (off) and the tool feed as a press. I don't have a broach. I have not done it before.

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flylo
02-27-2016, 09:04 AM
Glad you're still working on it!

Rosco-P
02-27-2016, 09:06 AM
Never thought of a new keyway. I have seen it done using a lathe (off) and the tool feed as a press. I don't have a broach. I have not done it before.

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See this thread for some ideas: http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/threads/69696-Cut-a-key-way-inside-small-bore

RussZHC
02-27-2016, 09:09 AM
For me I think this would a be a situation I would start with the "least" and if that did not work move to the next "least" etc.
Enlarge the hole for the next size up set screw (may not be able to get in the space to do that though), enlarge so you are away from the break TIG up and redo the hole, new collar, replace hub.
Granted those first two are sort of fiddly and take time whereas the new collar will work. I have not done the keyway on a lathe either but would not any reciprocating motion work? Asked since, if push comes to shove, I would attempt it with a drill press (first thing to mind with a simple "up down" motion), but it is pretty small, not too long, drilling out and filing might not take too much time.

ShawnR
02-27-2016, 10:20 AM
http://images.tapatalk-cdn.com/16/02/27/8c702cfb5aba307ac98385fea3fa769e.jpg

The head needs the most work so I left it till last. I wanted to get my shop back. Having all those parts spread out took up a lot of room.

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ShawnR
02-27-2016, 11:46 AM
I am going to work on the headstock next to get it cleaned up. The book says to remove the spindle, "remove the gear" ...I see no set screws or threads, although it looks like there is a small keyway, and from the diagram, a woodruff key, in there. I think that is what it is called. Does the gear just pull off? I put a bit of force on it with a puller and it no budge.

http://images.tapatalk-cdn.com/16/02/27/2a6df449ecf5ee72215eb60b1ac8a274.jpg

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RussZHC
02-27-2016, 12:41 PM
start with some lube, Kroil, PBBlaster etc. and give it some time to work, bit concerned about the fit at the very end, the interface between inside surface of gear and the shaft its on as it looks like there might be some peened over parts and its a tight press likely anyway and the passage of time won't make it easy plus the resistance of the woodruff key (I know its for rotational but given my limited past experiences there are a whole bunch more smaller surfaces that
stick/bond/corrode together and the gear needs to slide past all that)

Mike Burdick
02-27-2016, 12:43 PM
The gears, bearing, etc are all press fits and come off using a puller. It's been awhile since I worked on the one I have, but I made a puller using an all-thread bolt that ran thru the spindle and spacers that backed up the casting so it WOULDN'T BREAK - this is a must as those "ears" can break in a heartbeat! Unless you have a real good reason to remove the spindle, I'd just leave it alone. The bearings are precision and if one screws them up it will be a very costly mistake and if one breaks the casting, the lathe's trash! When the belt needs replacing, use a "link-belt".

ShawnR
02-27-2016, 09:40 PM
Went back to the pulley. The gear on the spindle is soaking with oil but it will be difficult.
Here is the pulley fix. I turned it close, then heated the collar and threw the pulley in the snow bank. It went together easy. Hope it is ok. Tapped the set screw hole before I assembled it.
http://images.tapatalk-cdn.com/16/02/27/2280f4eeeed2c5038f38991def35cb64.jpg

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ShawnR
03-05-2016, 07:37 PM
I managed to get the gear off and head stock apart. Still moving forward, at least. It took a bit of heat and careful pressure with a puller but not too bad. This ends the stripping and painting and so I can now start the repairing. I am sure I will have some touch ups to do but the majority painting will be done. I just wanted to update the thread. Not much exciting yet.
[emoji3]


http://images.tapatalk-cdn.com/16/03/05/bfa5f70326aa737294bac20f78d7b114.jpg

http://images.tapatalk-cdn.com/16/03/05/15af5fc0fa7f676f4c8dbf70286c958d.jpg

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