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View Full Version : Ingersoll Rand Type 30 Compressor Head, questions



cijuanni
04-08-2013, 09:01 PM
I have found one of these and am baffled by what model it is exactly and what was the original motor hp, since the motor is missing.

On the head plate it says......

Type 30
Model 41
Serial # 30T 459772
Max Pressure 1000psi

I haven't been able to find anything on a Model 41.

The flywheel/pulley is 3 groove.

I am trying to determine if the head, pressure and cfm are suitable for a sand blaster.

Any help is appreciated!

Don Young
04-08-2013, 09:54 PM
I know nothing specific about your compressor unit but the 1000PSI rating tells me it is very unlikely to produce enough CFM volume for sand blasting.

Guido
04-08-2013, 10:50 PM
Bore and stroke dimensions, multiple cylinder, first, second, third stage configured, diameter of input sheave/flywheel???????? Picture?

And, 1000 psi rating? As Mr. Young says 'unlikely for blasting air source'.

--G

cijuanni
04-08-2013, 11:15 PM
Bore and stroke dimensions, multiple cylinder, first, second, third stage configured, diameter of input sheave/flywheel???????? Picture?

And, 1000 psi rating? As Mr. Young says 'unlikely for blasting air source'.

--G

Don't know the bore or stroke.
2 cylinder, 2 stage.
No input sheave (missing), flywheel pulley is about 18.5" in diameter.
Sorry no photo.

Yes that 1000 psi is baffling. Is that possible out of a 2 stage pump? And why would a mechanic shop have a 1000 psi compressor, let alone on a 400 psi WP tank?

To add to the confusion the 2nd stage gauge is 0-250 psi and the tank gauge is 0-600 psi.

cijuanni
04-09-2013, 12:32 PM
Well I went back to where I found it and looked at a second identical one that still had the compressor manufacturers tag on it, General Electric.

Bores 4 & 1 1/2 x 3 1/2 stroke.

High pressure system 350 psi, low pressure system 255 psi.

9 cfm at 350 psi.
5hp @ 1450 rpm, 550 volts.

Hmmm.....

gcude
04-09-2013, 01:25 PM
I have a IR T-30 with an enormous General Electric 5 HP motor and 80 gallon tank. The compressor pulley is 15 3/8", motor pulley is 3 1/2", dual-V-belt. I would guess the motor on mine is original, since it looks ancient. The PO had the compressor overhauled and prior to him, Mobil Oil had it and used it for sandblasting. I run it at 125psi and have used it for sandblasting. Mine works well. I don't know the motor rpm, but it seems slow to me.

cijuanni
04-09-2013, 02:14 PM
OK, assuming the head works properly and can generate 9 cfm at 300-350 psi, but I only need 125psi to blast, wouldn't the 100 gallon or so tank allow me to use 18 or more cfm at the needed 125psi and not overwork the pump or exceed the capacity?

becksmachine
04-10-2013, 06:50 AM
OK, assuming the head works properly and can generate 9 cfm at 300-350 psi, but I only need 125psi to blast, wouldn't the 100 gallon or so tank allow me to use 18 or more cfm at the needed 125psi and not overwork the pump or exceed the capacity?

Probably not as this would require at least a doubling of the speed the pump was driven.

With a 1.5 inch second stage bore, you need a lot of strokes per minute to achieve 9 cfm, and a lot more to do 18.

A high pressure unit like this sounds as if it is used for process air of some sort, and the 575 volt thing sounds Canadian. Was this in a refinery?

Dave

cijuanni
04-10-2013, 10:20 AM
Probably not as this would require at least a doubling of the speed the pump was driven.

With a 1.5 inch second stage bore, you need a lot of strokes per minute to achieve 9 cfm, and a lot more to do 18.

A high pressure unit like this sounds as if it is used for process air of some sort, and the 575 volt thing sounds Canadian. Was this in a refinery?

Dave

I think we are aren't on the same page.
The original set up was a 550 volt 1450 rpm and produced 9 cfm at 350 psi.
It looks suspiciously Navy Gray, perhaps it was on a ship?

So the Ideal gas law PV = nRT,,,, 9 cfm at 350 psi goes into the tank and 18 cfm at 175 psi is withdrawn from the tank via a regulator or 25.2 cfm at 125 psi.
Deducting for wear, since it isn't new,, I am guessing 20 cfm or so at 125 psi with the original motor at 1450 rpm.

I would put a 1750 rpm motor on it and a smaller sheave or run the pump a bit faster.

Well according to theory,,, what says the real world. :)

becksmachine
04-10-2013, 11:46 AM
Oops, I think you are right, we weren't on the same page. :rolleyes:

I was thinking in terms of displacement rather than differing pressures.

Dave

Guido
04-10-2013, 01:44 PM
Kinda hard for me to get my head around a 4 in. diameter cylinder/piston feeding a small 1 1/2 in. diameter second stage HP piston. And the clearances required for operating at higher pressures and then the pv=nrt stuff. Had to repeat my physical chemistry class, once, could never get where the n came from.

Stroking at 1450 rpm, the 4 inch piston theoretically moves almost 40 cuft. of air, providing valving is working at 100 % and the intake is not restricted. Perfect world. In my small world, a simple compressor working at 100 psi max and 70% efficiency, a single 4 inch piston, stroking 3 1/2 inches, 1450 rpm would compress about 28 cuft of air, as measured at the intake.

Now, add a second stage of 1 1/2 inch piston so's to add pressure on up to 1K psi? Seems for the OP's machine to work at that pressure, I have to visualize the throughput of air when the machine is first started, at 0 psi. ie. For a few strokes at least, air is simply moving through the HP cylinder, directly to the receiver tank. As pressure builds, somewhere along the line, the output of the LP cylinder equalizes with the HP cylinder, which now becomes effective and continues to raise the pressure to a higher number. Compression ratios in both cylinders are governed by their clearance volumes, heat of compression comes up rapidly, how efficient are the cooling fins of both cylinders? Valving efficiencies become very pronounced at higher pressures. etc, etc, etc.

So, I can visualize the compressor at 0 psi startup, intaking 35 cuft per minute, maybe. As compression and heat rise, less and less air would be measured entering the system. The 9 cuft minute rate may well be correct, if the compressor is allowed to build on upwards of 1K psi. Horsepower required at that psi, I have no feeling for.

T'would be interesting to see this machine turned at 1750 rpm by a 25 hp gas engine, with a compression cut out set at 125 psi. Sizing of a ceramic blast nozzle (1/4 in.?) so's a sand blast feed pot pressure of 50 psi continuous was maintained, would make a helluva sand blaster for working out doors.

YMMV. Don't get hurt and don't spend too much effort and money without a second opinion, or even a third and fourth. If you get a system rigged up, pics would make a good show'n'tell.

--G

Mike Burdick
04-10-2013, 02:30 PM
Type 30
Model 41
Serial # 30T 459772
Max Pressure 1000psi



If this is of any help ...

Here's a pdf download link for the "Operation and Maintenance Instruction for the Type 30 Model 41" manual...

http://mrv-aircraft.com/manuals/Air%20Starts/Ace/500/Compressor%20Ops.pdf

.

cijuanni
04-10-2013, 11:55 PM
If this is of any help ...

Here's a pdf download link for the "Operation and Maintenance Instruction for the Type 30 Model 41" manual...

http://mrv-aircraft.com/manuals/Air%20Starts/Ace/500/Compressor%20Ops.pdf

.

Thanks Mike!!
I looked all over the net, and never did find really anything about the model 41.



T'would be interesting to see this machine turned at 1750 rpm by a 25 hp gas engine, with a compression cut out set at 125 psi. Sizing of a ceramic blast nozzle (1/4 in.?) so's a sand blast feed pot pressure of 50 psi continuous was maintained, would make a helluva sand blaster for working out doors.


Hey, you are stealing my plan. :)
That is what I would like to do, mount a gas motor and park this 1650 lb beast out in the back 40 and let the sand fly.