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View Full Version : OT: Is there a problem with your steel manufactorium?



Tony Ennis
05-20-2013, 10:33 PM
What's "oops" in Polish?


http://www.wimp.com/polishplant/

wierdscience
05-21-2013, 12:19 AM
Huh....Steel mills dangerous?Who knew?;)

Guido
05-21-2013, 01:01 AM
Been there-done that with cold steel, just as exciting, but never again-------

http://youtu.be/lkqpEXy0frE

Willy
05-21-2013, 01:18 AM
I thought the hot stuff was pretty exciting, but damn that's an awful lot of cold pipe to dodge!

Black_Moons
05-21-2013, 12:04 PM
lol! I was just thinking about that oil rig.. "uh guys... I don't think your done running yet.. if that pipe is comming outta there that fast.. and is that heavy... then uh, I think the main problem is not the pipe comming out, but whats comming out when the pipe gets outta the way.."

Fasttrack
05-21-2013, 01:36 PM
That makes for a bad day! Pretty cool to watch, though :) Looks soft and light until you hear it the floor with a thud.

Dr Stan
05-21-2013, 01:42 PM
More like what's "Oh sh!t" in Polish. I'm also amazed they just stood there and watched it all the while they were close enough to get hurt!

Paul Alciatore
05-21-2013, 03:05 PM
I thought the hot stuff was pretty exciting, but damn that's an awful lot of cold pipe to dodge!

But no one was dodging or running or even walking away. They even walked toward it after it just after it hit the floor. Duhhh??? Even if the rolls were shut down, some jackass might try to restart it.

I wonder if it happens every day and boredom has just set in. Someone is going to get a really "hot" necktie some day.

Krunch
05-21-2013, 05:55 PM
I remember my father telling me about something like that happening in a paper mill he ran back in the 1950s-60s The paper is running through the calendar rolls at something like 10 feet per second when something misfeeds, and all these papermaker guys are running around with razor-sharp knives (paper is very abrasive to an edge, so the knives need to be sharp and hard), trying to hack off the bitter end ZORRO! to prevent it all from bunching up and lifting these gigantic and HOT steel cylinders off their axles and turning the whole paper mill into something out of the Johnstown Flood...yikes

loose nut
05-21-2013, 06:23 PM
That big concrete block that the "hot" steel hit is there just to stop a runaway, shown in the vid. It isn't that unusual (not an everyday thing though) for that to happen, that's why no one was running away, they are used to it.

tyrone shewlaces
05-21-2013, 07:18 PM
That knot is easier to tie than to undo.

wierdscience
05-21-2013, 11:37 PM
But no one was dodging or running or even walking away. They even walked toward it after it just after it hit the floor. Duhhh??? Even if the rolls were shut down, some jackass might try to restart it.

I wonder if it happens every day and boredom has just set in. Someone is going to get a really "hot" necktie some day.

Maybe not,years ago on a jobsite I was welding under some scaffolding,about ten stories worth when I heard a familiar sound.
Bang!.......Bang!..Bang...........Bang......splat! And a 36" Stilsen wrench appeared in the mud about 20 feet from me.

In that situation you have a hard hat on,you don't dare look up and which way do you run?Twenty feet to thr right and I would have been hit,standing still it missed me.My money is on the rolling mill crew keeping their heads.Running might have meant running into a hot ribbon of steel instead of avoiding it.

wierdscience
05-21-2013, 11:42 PM
That knot is easier to tie than to undo.

At then end of the video it looks like the one guy is grabbing up an Oxygen lance:)

boslab
05-22-2013, 01:03 AM
The mill was already stopping as soon as the roll tension was lost, the plc's were shutting down the DC drives, they were walking towards it because they knew this, thereby also knew how long the cobble was going to be as it relates to the stand (roll) position, and the bloom/billot/slab size, from memory they tend to be just under 10m, which is the length of their walking beam reheat furnace, cobbles are frequent as the feedstock is narrow on that kind of mill, sheet mills fare better but are much more dangerous as the exit speed can exceed 60km/h, no one is allowed around the mill floor when rolling on the 7 stand mill where I work, far too dangerous, even the reversing roughing mill and coil box is considered off limits, the reason you grab the oxy lance as fast as you can is to cut the cobble while hot, you don't have to arse about with lance lighters or cardboard tubes and cutting torches, they use a 3/8" lance over there with a contessi lance holder, if your quick you can get in and cut the cobble out and be rolling in under 10 mins.if your slow and it cools you can be fighting it for hours as you have to put the mill into cold strand removal mode which really bumps the pressure up to maximum as you have to deal with cold steel, if its electrical steel it's worse as it will shatter like toughened glass.
Leaving a cobble cool in the mill knackers rolls too, the through roll cooling system can cope when the contact is intermittent but if static the rolls bend and distort to the point of being ruined fairly quickly, most mills will do a roll change after a cobble as a matter of course, a full change takes about 20 mins
It was a bit cleaner when I went there as they had painted everything! But we still ended up wearing the same orange and brown overalls as them because some numpty in the supply department liked Hollands football kit colours, seems Cosco and corus had a lot in common.
Mark

fjk
05-23-2013, 10:23 AM
I read a book a while back, American Steel by Richard Preston, which described the process Nucor went through to bring up their Crawfordsville IN continuous casting plant. While doing the fine tuning of the caster, occasionally the hot metal would break out of the slab as it came out of the caster --- spraying molten steel all over the place. Fun stuff...

J Tiers
05-23-2013, 07:49 PM
They have a plant there? I've been there a lot, but never even saw it. In fact I'll be there this weekend.

boslab
05-23-2013, 08:22 PM
I read a book a while back, American Steel by Richard Preston, which described the process Nucor went through to bring up their Crawfordsville IN continuous casting plant. While doing the fine tuning of the caster, occasionally the hot metal would break out of the slab as it came out of the caster --- spraying molten steel all over the place. Fun stuff...
Breakouts are nasty, cleaning up is horrible, it's hard work changing segments because they are one big lump of solidified crap, even nastier with a fast casting speed like upwards of 2 m/min with a wide slab, boom comes to mind
Bearing in mind that you are normally standing next to thing going boom, protective suits are ok for the heat but no one tells you that when it goes boom the shower you get is 8 times heavier than water, you know what a bucket of water hitting you feels like, X8 it will seriously bust you up, a ladle breakout is even more fearsome, they normally occur with a refractory failure, on the ladles we use there is normally about 350 tons of liquid sunshine at 1450 and up degrees C, that's a bad day, as is through the plates on the ladle gate, comes at you like a sheet, horizontally at the bottom of the ladle.
The steel industry is not recomended as a job for life!
I,m glad and sorry at the same time that I,m finishing soon after 30 odd years, the last bit has been nice in the lab but the rest has been hard, you get used to burns and heat, someone with a bad burn stinks of roast pork, I have heared the blunt comment "pass the apple sauce, I think he's done" once when one of the blokes got a boot full of steel during a mould surge/ breakout.
Not i job I would recomended to my kids, worse still in countries like India there are kids with bare feet working there!, life is cheap in some countries.
It was nice to get a bit involved with setting up a minimill in Alabama, think it still working
Mark

Elninio
05-24-2013, 04:21 PM
Been there-done that with cold steel, just as exciting, but never again-------

http://youtu.be/lkqpEXy0frE

wow

kendall
05-24-2013, 11:42 PM
Maybe not,years ago on a jobsite I was welding under some scaffolding,about ten stories worth when I heard a familiar sound.
Bang!.......Bang!..Bang...........Bang......splat! And a 36" Stilsen wrench appeared in the mud about 20 feet from me.

In that situation you have a hard hat on,you don't dare look up and which way do you run?Twenty feet to thr right and I would have been hit,standing still it missed me.My money is on the rolling mill crew keeping their heads.Running might have meant running into a hot ribbon of steel instead of avoiding it.

This, 100% Been there often enough.

needlenose
05-25-2013, 10:41 AM
Cool! A neon lighting factory!